The one thing Steve Jobs and Bill Gates agreed on

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Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, rivals and friends.
Steve Jobs and Bill Gates shared same view on kids and technology
Photo: AllThingsD

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates didn’t always see eye to eye. When it came to their kids’ relationships to technology, however, it seems they agreed on more than they disagreed on.

That’s based on a new interview with Microsoft co-founder Gates, in which he says he and his wife didn’t allow their children to have cellphones until they were 14 — and limited other screen time as well. Jobs did much the same.

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iMac’s terrible code name was an in-joke between Jobs and Schiller

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iMac
The iMac G3 could have had a very different name.
Photo: Apple

The first iMac’s frightful code name was an in-joke that reflected Steve Jobs’ respect for Sony.

The working name — “MacMan” — was so horrible it would “curdle your blood,” according to Ken Segall, the Apple exec who eventually came up with the name “iMac.” Nearly 20 years after Apple shipped the iMac G3, we now have an explanation for the craptacular internal name — courtesy of Phil Schiller, the guy who came up with it.

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Today in Apple history: Apple II brings color computing to the masses

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The Apple II was groundbreaking for its day.
Photo: Computer History Museum

April17April 17, 1977: The Apple II debuts at the West Coast Computer Faire, positioning Apple at the forefront of the looming personal computer revolution.

The company’s first mass-market computer, the Apple II boasts an attractively machined case designed by Jerry Manock (who will later design the first Macintosh), plus a keyboard, BASIC compatibility and color graphics. With some marketing savvy from Steve Jobs, its makes quite a splash at the San Francisco Bay Area’s first personal computer convention.

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The secret lives of iPhone factory workers, this week on The CultCast

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This week: an iPhone factory mole tells all.
This week: an iPhone factory mole tells all.

This week on The CultCast: Official new Nvidia drivers make your Mac compatible with the best GPUs on the market! Plus: A mole gives us our best look yet at what it’s really like to work in an iPhone factory; Apple’s working on a “breakthrough” diabetes treatment with the Apple Watch; and the saga of Ron Wayne, the forgotten Apple co-founder who traded his $22 billion of Apple stock for just $800.

Our thanks to Casper, maker of the internet’s favorite mattress, for supporting this episode. Learn why and save $50 off your order at casper.com/cultcast.

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Apple Park (Minecraft Edition) is officially open for business

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Take a tour of Apple Park.
Take a tour of Apple Park.
Photo: Alex Westlund

The official Apple Park campus should open its doors to employees later this month, but if you can’t wait for Apple to take the wraps off its shiny new spaceship, the Minecraft replica is now complete.

We got our first look at the Minecraft version of Apple Park earlier this month and were blown away by the amount of detail creator Alex Westlund threw in. Now after 413 hours of work, you can fly through Apple’s new campus and gawk at the last Apple product Steve Jobs unveiled.

Check it out:

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Today in Apple history: Apple co-founder quits and cashes in his stake for $800

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Ron Wayne: today, and when he co-founded Apple in 1976
Ron Wayne today and when he co-founded Apple in 1976.
Photo: Ron Wayne

April12 April 12, 1976: Apple’s third co-founder, a former Atari colleague of Steve Wozniak’s named Ron Wayne, cashes in his Apple shares for just $800.

Wayne, who owns a 10 percent stake in the company, throws in the towel after worrying that he doesn’t have the time or energy to properly invest in Apple. He later receives an extra $1,500 check to seal the deal. When he cashes it, he loses out on an investment worth billions.

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Today in Apple history: Apple-1 starts a revolution

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The Apple-1 in all its glory!
Photo: Auction Team Breker

April11April 11, 1976: Apple releases its first computer, the Apple-1.

Designed and hand-built by Steve Wozniak, the computers are sold wholesale by “Steven” Jobs. To finance their manufacturing, Wozniak sells his HP-65 calculator for $500, while Jobs sells his VW van. Years later, in 2014, a working Apple-1 will sell at auction for $905,000.

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Steve Jobs’ original Apple-1 is going on display

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New exhibition will show off the most important computer in Apple history.
Photo: Living Computers

An ultra-rare Apple-1 prototype used by Steve Jobs as a demo unit is going on display at a Seattle computer museum. It’s the crown jewel of an impressive collection of vintage Apple gear that will be housed in a new wing opening Friday at Living Computers: Museum + Labs.

Lāth Carlson, the museum’s executive director, calls the Apple prototype “the most important computer in history” — and also “the most boring to look at.”

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Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs loses control of the Mac

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Steve Jobs was distraught at being removed as general manager of the Mac division.
Photo: iFixit

Ap10 April 10, 1985: During a fateful meeting, Apple CEO John Sculley threatens to resign unless the Apple board removes Steve Jobs as executive VP and general manager of the Macintosh division.

This triggers a series of events that will ultimately result in Jobs’ exit. The marathon board meeting — which continued for several hours the next day — results in the Apple co-founder losing his operating role within the company, but being allowed to stay on as chairman. Things don’t exactly play out like that.

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