GameSir G4 Pro is the cross-platform game controller you’re looking for [Review]

By

GameSir G4 Pro review
GameSir G4 Pro game controller can be used with iPhone and Android devices. And iPad and PC too. Plus Nintendo Switch.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

The GameSir G4 Pro is a wireless game controller that works with iPhone and iPad but also PC, Android and Switch. It resembles a wireless Xbox controller but with a flip-out mount for holding an iPhone.

I did quite a bit of gaming with the G4 Pro. Here’s how it stood up.

Add game to your iPhone with GameSir X2 side-by-side game controller

By

GameSir X2 Bluetooth Mobile Gaming Controller works with iPhone and Android
The GameSir X2 Bluetooth Mobile Gaming Controller is compatible with Apple Arcade and cloud-gaming services.
Photo: GameSir

Clip the GameSir X2 Bluetooth Mobile Gaming Controller to an iPhone or Android to add physical controls to the handset. It uses a split design that puts the buttons and joysticks on either side of the screen.

GameSir also launched the F7 Claw Tablet Game Controller for larger devices.

Apple works to bring Xbox Series X controller support to iOS and Mac

By

Xbox Series X controller
An update is on the way.
Photo: Microsoft

Apple is working with Microsoft to make new Xbox Series X controllers compatible with iPhone, iPad, Mac and more.

Support for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and other controllers is already baked into the latest versions of iOS. It’s not yet clear if Apple will add support for the PlayStation 5’s new DualSense controller, too.

More affordable Apple Watch might be in development

By

More affordable Apple Watch would be nice.
A less-expensive Apple Watch is just one of the predictions made today by a serial leaker.
Illustration: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

A regular source of Apple leaks said on Thursday that a less expensive version of the Apple Watch is in the offing.

This was just one of multiple tidbits Jon Prosser dropped during a public Q&A session. He mentioned the first MacBook with Apple silicon, talked a bit about the company’s game controller, and more.

Apple makes finding the right Xbox controller for Apple Arcade a snap

By

Xbox controller for Apple Arcade
The Apple Store is selling the single Xbox controller compatible with Apple Arcade.
Photo: Apple

Finding the one model of Xbox controller that’s compatible with Apple Arcade is now as easy as ordering it from the Apple Store.

Many of the games in this company’s new gaming service can be played with an Xbox or PS4 wireless controller, but only a very limited selection of controllers are supported. Listing one in Apple’s online store simplifies getting the right one.

Gamevice controller for iPhone falls flat where it really counts [Review]

By

Fortnite with iPhone XS in Gamevice controller
The Gamevice is good, but not great.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

Mobile gaming has never been better, but you’re missing out if you’re playing the latest titles with touch controls. A good controller is a worthwhile purchase, but should you spend $75 on the Gamevice?

It looks great, boasts the best design of any iPhone controller, and never needs charging. It also works with almost any iPhone. The only problem? It disappoints where it matters most.

This post contains affiliate links. Cult of Mac may earn a commission when you use our links to buy items.

Fortnite update makes gunfights easier than ever

By

Fortnite iOS 14
Everyone should welcome skill-based matchmaking.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

Fortnite season five is now in full swing, giving players new areas to explore, a new vehicle to ride around in, and more. The latest Fortnite update also makes huge control improvements.

Players on iOS will find gunfights easier thanks to autofire, while those on Nintendo Switch can enjoy more accurate aiming with motion control.

The reborn NES controller proves even classics can be improved [Deals]

By

Bring back the feel of gaming's golden age for all the games we play today.
Bring back the feel of gaming's golden age for all the games we play today.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

Gaming has come a long, long way since the ‘80s, but the simplicity and familiarity of the good old days still resonates. The NES30 Bluetooth controller mixes the best of the old and the new, in a sleek controller that streamlines the original brick-like controller of the NES, and updates it with all the functions needed for modern gaming. It’s a fully featured blast from the past that’s just $36.99.

RP One iOS Game Controller Is Full-Size — And Full Price — For A Reason

By

Credit: Mark Prince
Credit: Mark Prince

A key feature in iOS 7 dangles the prospect of console-style action in front of hard-core gamers hooked on action-platformers and first-person shooters. But while developers can now add controller support to games, hardware makers face a new challenge: getting gamers to shell out $100 to morph their iPhones or iPads into console killers.

Hardware maker Signal is unapologetic about the hefty price tag for its new RP One controller, one of several new gaming devices certified under Apple’s Made for iPhone (MFi) program.

“Quality is not free,” Signal’s director Mark Prince told Cult of Mac, “and it makes no sense to compare an MFi controller to a ‘bag and tag’ generic [Bluetooth] controller.”

Core gamers want to sit down with a precision controller when they immerse themselves in a console game. iOS developers compete with the big boys of console gaming like Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo, for their audience’s gaming dollars.

It’s a clear trend, and even Apple, which has long played the “we don’t care much about gaming” card with iOS, has finally introduced built-in code to support game controllers.

Peripheral makers Logitech, SteelSeries, and Moga have all put their efforts into iOS 7-compatible controllers, each a little different. They all run $100, though, leaving gamers wondering if Apple has set the pricing.

“$100 is probably the lowest viable price point for most if not all of us to cover development, material and manufacturing costs, plus packaging, distribution and retail margins,” said Prince. “We’d like to go on record as saying that Apple does not set these prices.”