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Apple offers to ‘work alongside’ filmmakers to improve Final Cut Pro

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Many film and TV editors say Final Cut Pro is powerful and fun to use. So why can't it be a professional standard?
Many film and TV editors say Final Cut Pro is powerful and fun to use. So why can't it be a professional standard?
Image: Apple

In April, a group of film and TV professionals signed an open letter asking Apple to address longstanding Final Cut Pro upgrade requests and to better promote the popular and powerful program as a standard editing tool in their industry.

Cupertino offered some reassurance in a public reply to the letter on Thursday.

Film and TV pros want Apple to love Final Cut Pro as much as they do

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Many film and TV editors say Final Cut Pro is powerful and fun to use. So why can't it be a professional standard?
Many film and TV editors say Final Cut Pro is powerful and fun to use. So why can't it be a professional standard?
Image: Apple

In an open letter sent to Apple CEO Tim Cook on Tuesday, more than 100 film and TV professionals called on the company to publicly commit to building its video editing software Final Cut Pro into an industry-standard tool.

The group praised FCP as as “the biggest leap forward in editing technology since the move to digital” but complained it’s not living up to its potential.

The group noted, bitterly, that even the crew on CODA — the first streaming service release to win a Best Picture Oscar, and Apple’s own release — would probably not have chosen to edit it with FCP.

Oops, some of Apple’s own apps don’t support new MacBook Pro screen notch

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Oops, some of Apple’s own apps don’t support new MacBook Pro screen notch
Apple Logic Pro running on the 2021 MacBook Pro shows a lot of dead space because there’s no support for the screen notch.
Photo: Apple

The just-launched MacBook Pro models are the first with a screen notch. And this apparently came as a surprise to many of Apple’s own software developers as some of the company’s professional apps don’t support the screen cutouts. Which means they can’t fill the new Mac displays and must leave blank areas.

This won’t make it easier for Apple to convince third-party developers to fully support the latest macOS notebooks.

We talk next-gen AirPods and the return of Touch ID, on The CultCast

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CultCast 442: AirPods with health sensors
Can you handle some hot, hot beta action?
Image: The CultCast

This week on The CultCast: The next generation of AirPods might be incoming! We’ll tell you what we know. Plus, Final Cut Pro and Logic Pro are likely coming to iPad, along with Mini LED and Touch ID … under the screen. This could be the new Touch ID tech we’ve been waiting for. And stay tuned to hear how to listen to YouTube music in the background, without paying for YouTube Red. It’s a hot tip, and it’s coming your way.

Our thanks to Netgear for supporting this episode. The Orbi WiFi 6 router gives you ultra-fast speeds and wider coverage throughout your home – it’s the biggest revolution in Wi-Fi ever. Check it out today at Netgear.com/bestwifi.

iOS 13 concept gives iPad the features it desperately needs

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iOS 13
Apple, please steal this.
Photo: Léo Vallet

There are less than 100 days until WWDC 2019 and new iPad features are looming large on the mind of Apple fans.

In a new iOS 13 mockup, concept designer Léo Valle suggests some simple, yet groundbreaking features that would make the iPad a true Mac replacement. Some of these features probably won’t make the cut on iOS 13 this year, but even if one makes it’d be a game-changer.

Why creative pros can’t rely on iPad Pro [Opinion]

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Is the 2018 iPad Pro or a MacBook a better option for you?
Futurists claim the iPad has already eliminated the need for a Mac. Realists say nah.
Photo: Leander Kahney/Cult of Mac

Since the new iPad Pro’s launch, debate about the powerful devices has become increasingly polarized into two opposing camps: futurists and realists.

The futurists argue that the iPad is the future computing. Apple’s tablet has eliminated the need for laptops, they say, and anyone who claims they can’t manage their workflows on iOS is living in the past (and should just get with the program).

The realists, on the other hand, retort that while the iPad may be cool, it remains limited by iOS in a lot of very important ways. Those limitations mean it is currently impossible to use the iPad as a primary workstation for pros.

So, who is right?