Still using an original iPhone? We want to know.

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A shot of the battered original iPhone belonging to a member of the design team.
Photo: Leander Kahney/Cult of Mac

Next week marks 10 years since Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone, blowing our collective minds regarding the possibilities that smartphones presented.

Coming up on a decade later, if you’re still using the first-gen iPhone on a regular basis, we want to hear from you!

Today in Apple history: Stock ‘backdating’ scandal hits Steve Jobs

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There was even some speculation Jobs could lose his, err, job.
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Dec28December 28, 2006: As the rest of the country enjoys a much-deserved holiday, Apple gets embroiled in a stock “backdating” scandal.

The news, centered on the dubious awarding of stock options to Steve Jobs, prompts Apple share prices to fall. Some people even suggest Jobs might have to step down as Apple CEO. Fortunately, that doesn’t happen.

The weirdest Apple stories of 2016

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Wierdest Stories 2016
It's been a weird year. And Apple's no exception.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

2016 Year in Review Cult of Mac Covering Cupertino is more than just statistics and rumors about upcoming products. There’s plenty of weird Apple news, whether it be a Chinese billionaire buying iPhones for his pet dog or the revelation that, in some alternate universe, Tim Cook could become vice president of the United States.

With that in mind, here are the weirdest Apple news stories of 2016.

Today in Apple history: Apple invents ‘slide to unlock’

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Apple didn't invent the Slide to Unlock gesture.
"Slide to unlock" drew audible gasps from the audience when Steve Jobs first showed it off.
Photo: Jared Earle/Flickr

Dec23 December 23, 2005: Apple files a patent application for its iconic “slide to unlock” gesture for the iPhone.

Although the iPhone is still a secret research project at the time, the ability to unlock the device by sliding your finger across it signifies everything Apple wants the iPhone to be: easy to use, intuitive and technologically miles ahead of the competition.

Today in Apple history: Apple brings back Jobs with NeXT buyout

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Steve Jobs pictured on December 20, 1996.
Photo: Tim Holmes/Flickr CC

Dec20December 20, 1996: Apple Computer officially buys NeXT, the computer company Steve Jobs founded after leaving Apple a decade earlier.

The deal costs Apple $429 million, a massive price to pay for the failing NeXT which has already seen its hardware division crash and burn.

The price is worth it when you consider what Apple gets as part of the deal, however: the return of Steve Jobs.

Today in Apple history: Apple goes public

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December 12, 1980, was an incredibly important day for Apple.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac/401Calculator

Dec12December 12, 1980: Apple goes public as it floats 4.6 million shares on the stock market for the first time.

In the biggest tech IPO of its day, more than 40 out of 1,000 Apple employees become instant millionaires. As Apple’s biggest shareholder, 25-year-old Steve Jobs ends the day with a net worth of $217 million.

Today in Apple history: The Byte Shop, Apple’s first retailer, opens

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Paul Terrell founded the Byte Shop on his birthday.
Photo: NextShark/Paul Terrell

Dec8 December 8, 1975: San Francisco Bay Area entrepreneur Paul Terrell opens The Byte Shop, one of the world’s first computer stores and the first to sell an Apple computer.

Years before Apple would open its own retail stores, the Byte Shop stocks the first 50 Apple-1 computers built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

Today in Apple history: Apple suffers first quarterly loss since Jobs’ return

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Apple is heading toward a $1 trillion market cap. Photo: Pierre Marcel/Flickr CC
Apple's stock price fell as a result of the news.
Photo: Apfellike

Dec6December 6, 2000: Apple’s stock price falls after Apple Computer posts its first quarterly loss in three years, since Steve Jobs’ return to the company.

Shares tumble $3 to just $14 a share as some doom-predicting pundits worry that the big Apple comeback story is screeching to a halt.

Little did they know…

5 years after his death, Steve Jobs remains among top ‘current’ tech leaders

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Steve Jobs was anything but a bust as CEO.
Steve Jobs is still one of the most revered leaders in tech.
Photo: China News

Put it down to Steve Jobs’ astonishing legacy — or poor reading comprehension — but according to a poll of 700 tech company founders, the late Apple CEO is among the most admired “current” tech leaders.

Despite having died five years ago, Jobs scored fourth place in the poll, following Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.