Here’s how Apple’s celebrating International Women’s Day

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Apple female coders 1
Apple has teamed up with a nonprofit to help teach young women to code.
Photo: Apple

To coincide with International Women’s Day, Apple has partnered with the nonprofit “Girls Who Code.” The partnership aims to expand learning opportunities for young women.

To do this, Apple is providing its Swift-focused “Everyone Can Code” curriculum to club leaders across the U.S. to help expand the number of coding clubs. This will ultimately benefit up to 90,000 young women.

Apple teams with nonprofit to help underrepresented groups enter tech industry

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Dream Corps
Apple wants to teach the world to code.
Photo: Apple

Apple is partnering with Dream Corps to help men and women from “underrepresented backgrounds [to] find success in the tech sector.”

The Oakland, California-based nonprofit is behind the initiative #YesWeCode. This project aims to increase opportunities in tech companies. With Apple’s support, it’s now got a tech giant in its corner.

Apple offers free coding classes and learning materials

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In December, Apple will offer free coding classes to teach kids and teens.
In December, Apple will offer free coding classes to teach kids and teens.
Photo: Apple

Next month, there will be thousands of free Hour of Code sessions at all Apple Stores around the world. These will help people at a variety of skill levels learn coding

In addition, the company also just introduced new materials to help teach coding inside and outside the classroom.

Apple teams up with French school to teach Swift coding

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Swift 2
Apple is spreading its Swift curriculum around the world.
Photo: Apple

Apple is teaming up with a French digital vocational school Simplon to teach Swift coding to learners. Swift is the language used for developing iOS apps.

“Proud to announce our new training program in partnership with France’s [Simplon], teaching the basics of coding with Swift,” Tim Cook wrote in a tweet. “Learning to code unlocks a world of creativity and potential.”

How Apple Watch apps’ death spiral nearly killed my iPhone app

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Developing watch apps ain't easy
Developing watch apps ain't easy
Photo: Graham Bower/Cult of Mac

Two years ago, my partner and I launched an Apple Watch app to complement our iPhone fitness app. Little did we know that our embrace of Apple’s smartwatch would threaten the very existence of the gym app we’d been developing since 2012.

Each year since we launched Reps & Sets, we updated it to keep up-to-speed with all the cool new features Apple rolled out at its Worldwide Developers Conference. That all changed last year, though. That’s when we discovered that, by adding support for Apple Watch, we had inadvertently taken a poison pill that could effectively kill our iPhone app.

It doesn’t have to be this way. With a few key changes, Apple could turns things around and reinvigorate the Apple Watch app ecosystem.

Apple celebrates young developers at Chicago store event

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Everyone Can Code
Chicago's Mayor attended the event.
Photo: Mayor Rahm Emanuel

Apple held a special “Today at Apple” session on Wednesday at its Michigan Avenue, Chicago store to celebrate young developers.

The event took place under the banner of Apple’s “Everyone Can Code” initiative, and featured students who had participated in the “One Summer Chicago” program, giving a public demonstration of their Swift-coded apps.

Learn to code on iOS with awesome perks — for a price

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This is a great opportunity to add the super marketable skill of coding to your resume.
Lambda School's coding academy sounds almost too good to be true.
Photo: Cult of Mac

A Silicon Valley is offering wannabe coders the opportunity to get a free MacBook and free housing while taking their 30-week iOS coding course.

Of course, there’s a bit of a catch with the offer. Lambda School CEO Austen Allred revealed his school’s amazing offer along with the stipulation that if you do find a job and start earning over $50k a year, you have to pay the school back.

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In its first five years, the App Store becomes an unstoppable money machine, paying out $10 billion to app developers.
In its first five years, the App Store becomes an unstoppable money machine.
Photo: Apple

Location for yesterday’s iPad event is new HQ for Apple’s coding initiative

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HQ
Apple wants to teach the world to Swift.
Photo: Ian Fuchs/Cult of Mac

The site of Apple’s education-themed event yesterday, Lane Tech College Prep High School, is set to become a special hub for the company’s “Everyone Can Code” initiative.

Working with Chicago Public Schools and Northwestern University, Apple announced that the Chicago-based institute will become a special “Center for Excellence” that will be used as a teaching and learning hub to introduce high school teachers to the Swift-focused curriculum.