Third man charged in ‘Celebgate’ iCloud hacking scheme

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iPhone hack
Phishing scam targeted dozens of celebrities, along with other users.
Image: Cult of Mac

A third man has plead guilty to hacking 550 iCloud and Google Gmail accounts, including those belonging to 40 celebrities — resulting in the leaking of sensitive photos and videos.

Chicago resident Emilio Herrera participated in the phishing scam between April 2013 and August 2014, which involved sending out alerts that appeared to have come from Apple, Yahoo, and Hotmail, requesting username and password information.

Why you shouldn’t trust Apple ID prompts in third-party apps

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Not all Apple ID prompts are created equal.
Not all Apple ID prompts are created equal.
Photo: Jan Vašek/Pixabay CC

Beware phone scammers who warn of iCloud hack

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iCloud iPhone
iCloud servers are operating by third-parties in China.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

iPhone owners plagued by another iCloud phishing scam

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icloud_fake
Watch out for messages like this!
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

iPhone owners in the U.K. have complained about being targeted with a phishing scam trying to trick them into revealing personal information by claiming that there is a problem with their iCloud account.

The scam message appears to come from an official Apple account called “iSupport,” and says that specific iCloud accounts have been deactivated and that users should head to an external website to confirm their user details and “reactivate [their] account.”

Google cracks down on shady, fake download buttons

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You'll probably see more of this screen until things get fixed.
You'll probably see more of this screen until things get fixed.
Photo: Google

If you use Google’s Chrome web browser, you’re now even safer from sneaky advertisers that try to get you to download their crummy software with fake download buttons.

Chances are you’ve seen these around, even on some large sites like Sourceforge and CNET, and might have clicked on one or two by accident, as intended.

Google’s new addition to its Safe Browsing initiative will block sites that have these deceptive download buttons on them.

Apple explains how to keep yourself safe from phishing hacks on the web

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The trusty green lock you should be paying attention to while surfing.
The trusty green lock you should be paying attention to while surfing. Screenshot: Alex Heath/ Cult of Mac

Recent reports of iCloud phishing attempts in China illustrate just how important it is always verify that you’re logging into legitimate websites before you enter your precious passwords.

To help, Apple today outlined how users can protect themselves from phishing attacks, in which bad guys pose as legitimate entities in an attempt to gain sensitive data on the web. Apple’s simple PSA page shows how web surfers can verify the authenticity of any website.