Force websites to comply with macOS Catalina’s Safari Dark Mode

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Dark mode for safari
Sometimes only Dark Mode will do.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

I stopped reading white text on a black background the moment I left school, and I’ve never liked it since. Especially on a screen, where the black expanse becomes a dark mirror that reflects everything in its sight. But even I prefer Dark Mode late at night, when I want to read without disturbing other people.

The trouble is, many websites don’t support Dark Mode. Everything else in Safari is rendered in tasteful black, but the page itself is still rendered in glaring white. Happily, on the Mac at least, there’s a way to fix it. Here’s how to force any website to support Safari Dark Mode on Mac.

macOS Catalina 10.15.2 goes into beta testing

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macOS Catalina 10.15.2 beta available for developers
Developers get their first taste of macOS Catalina 10.15.2 in beta form.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Testing for the next version of macOS just began. macOS Catalina 10.15.2 will replace a update that came out only a week ago, but Apple never really stops work on any of its operating systems.

All we know at this point is that the initial beta of this upcoming version makes a few tweaks to networking, but more significant changes are possible.

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Jamf Now devices
Jamf Now helps keep employees' devices secure and up to date.
Photo: Jamf Now

16-inch MacBook Pro leaks again in macOS Catalina

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16-inch-MacBook-Pro-keyboard
Are you ready?
Photo: Apple

Another image of a new 16-inch MacBook Pro (above) has been leaked by macOS 10.15.1 Catalina.

The photo reveals a redesigned keyboard layout, with a Touch ID sensor separated from the Touch Bar. But it does not confirm rumors of a return for the dedicated escape key.

It’s also hard to tell whether this keyboard uses the dreaded butterfly switches that MacBook Pro fans want Apple to abolish. And we could be waiting a long time to find out.

Retroactive app lets you run Aperture, iTunes in macOS Catalina

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screenshot of Retroactive from GitHub
It's OK to update to macOS Catalina. Retroactive will modify Aperture, iTunes and iPhones with the new OS.
Screenshot: Retroactive/GitHub

Apple told us it was time to move on when it killed two of its most popular apps, Aperture for photographers and iTunes, a music storage system that launched many DJ careers.

But an open-source app, aptly named Retroactive, brings new life to those beloved programs so that they can run in macOS Catalina.