Apple bars Bloomberg from iPad event as payback for spy chip story

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More than a year of reporting went into
More than a year of reporting went into "The Big Hack," an explosive story about Chinese spy chips.
Photo: Bloomberg Businessweek

Apple and Amazon are already starting to make retaliatory moves on Bloomberg Businessweek for its claims that the two companies’ servers were hacked by China.

Amazon pulled its Q4 ads from Bloomberg’s website, cutting off significant ad revenue. Meanwhile, Apple has decided to give Bloomberg the old Gizmodo treatment — by banning the company from next week’s “There’s More in the Making” event.

Amazon and Super Micro also want retraction of spy chip story

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Tim Cook
Tim Cook previously asked Bloomberg to retract story.
Photo: Apple

The CEO of Amazon Web Services and the CEO of Super Micro have joined Apple CEO Tim Cook is asking Bloomberg to retract its recent spy chip story.

All three companies were named in a recent Bloomberg Businessweek article claiming that Chinese spy chips had been embedded into hardware supplied by Super Micro. Since the story first broke, Super Micro lost more than half its value in a single day. Unsurprisingly, it’s not happy about it. And clearly neither is Amazon.

Super Micro will investigate its hardware after spy chip allegations

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computer chip
Super Micro is accused of manufacturing hardware containing Chinese spy chips.
Photo: JÉSHOOTS/Pexels

Super Micro Computer, the manufacturer of technology accused by Bloomberg of containing Chinese spy chips, has said that it will carry out a review of its own hardware.

This isn’t any kind of admission on its part, however. In a letter to customers, the firm noted how, “Despite the lack of any proof that a malicious hardware chip exists, we are undertaking a complicated and time-consuming review to further address the article.”

Tim Cook calls on Bloomberg to retract Chinese spy chip claims

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Apple revenues
Tim Cooks delivers bad news to investors.
Photo: Apple

Apple CEO Tim Cook is fighting back against a story from Bloomberg that claimed Chinese hackers put spy chips in Apple and Amazon’s servers.

In a recent interview, Cook went on the record for the first time to deny the allegations. Cook also called on Bloomberg to retract its story saying it is absolutely false.

Apple bans apps from selling your friends’ contact info

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How to remove suggested contacts on iPhone and iPad
Apple is clamping down on privacy issues.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

iOS app that misuse iPhone owners’ contact data for their own gain are about to get slammed with the ban hammer.

Apple revealed a number of new ways it’s trying to protect users’ privacy at WWDC 2018, but one major change that wasn’t mentioned on stage could have huge ramifications for companies that try to profit off your iPhone’s contact information.

Doom is not on Apple’s audacious agenda

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iPhone X Product Red Wallpaper
Believe it or not, Apple has a plan.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

With smartphone sales plateauing, the iPhone can no longer propel Apple to the sort of stratospheric success the company (and its shareholders) enjoyed over the past decade.

Is Apple CEO Tim Cook clueless? Will Apple be caught flat-footed, unable to pivot and move to the next big thing? The latest prediction of Apple’s impending doom sounds particularly dire.

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Blind survey
Apple's building a huge team of data scientists.
Photo: Duncan Sinfield

Trump thanks Tim Cook for Apple’s $350 billion bonanza

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Trump
Trump's tax changes have been great for Apple.
Photo: Bloomberg

Tim Cook finally earned some praise from long-time foe Donald Trump today, thanks to Apple’s plan to contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy over the next five years.

Trump went so far as to call Tim Cook “a great guy” during a speech at a factory in Pennsylvania today while talking about Apple’s investment into the U.S.

Battery replacement program could be bad news for iPhone sales

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iPhone battery
Brazil demands easy iPhone battery replacements.
Photo: iFixit

Apple’s iPhone battery replacement program could cause the company to lose out on millions of new iPhone sales, according to analysts at Barclays.

It was revealed last month that the company intentionally throttles CPU speeds on some iPhones with older batteries to provide an overall better experience. Apple has offered $29 battery replacements to make up for it, but that might be bad news for its bottom line.

Key Apple supplier strikes AR glasses deal

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Face Id
Apple smart glasses would have to look stylish.
Photo: Apple

One of Apple’s biggest manufacturing partners says it plans to get into the augmented reality business.

Quanta Computer revealed today that it has struck an agreement to start making lenses for an augmented reality headset. Even though the deal isn’t with Apple, it could signal that augmented reality headsets are about to hit the market in a big way.