Today in Apple history: Mac users can run Windows with Boot Camp

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Boot Camp finally allowed Macs to run Windows with ease.
Boot Camp finally allowed Macs to run Windows with ease.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

April 5: Today in Apple history: Mac users can run Windows with Boot Camp April 5, 2006: Apple introduces the public beta of Boot Camp, software that allows users with an Intel-based Mac to run Windows XP on their machines.

Boot Camp will officially arrive in Mac OS X “Leopard,” which debuts at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference a few month later.

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Winclone 6 makes it even easier to back up and copy your Mac's Windows partition.
Winclone 6 makes it even easier to back up and copy your Mac's Windows partition.
Image: Twocanoes Software

Boot Camp 6 brings Windows 10 to Mac

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Boot Camp now supports Windows 10.
Boot Camp now supports Windows 10.
Photo: Microsoft

Mac users can now use Windows 10 on their OS X machines, thanks to an update for Boot Camp released by Apple this morning.The new Boot Camp 6 update is still propagating through Apple’s servers, but some users have found the update is available on Windows partitions in BootCamp.

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osx-borderless
NTFS for Mac breaks down the barriers between Windows and OS X -- and you could win a copy!
Photo: Paragon Software Group

This is what Boot Camp looked like in the 1980s

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The original Boot Camp ran on an Amiga.
The original Boot Camp ran on an Amiga.
Photo: Reddit

Does your Mac also boot into Windows? Mine does, and it’s a pretty great perk of owning a Mac since 2006. But modern Intel-based Macs aren’t the only ones that can dual boot operating systems.

Proof? This Amiga from the 1980s booting up Mac OS 6.0.1, the result of a particularly clever hack from the vintage computing archives.

Boot Camp just got a little worse for the 2015 MacBook Pro

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Boot Camp just got a little worse on the latest MacBook Pros. Screenshot: Cult of Mac
Boot Camp just got a little worse on the latest MacBook Pros. Screenshot: Cult of Mac

First introduced in 2006, shortly after Apple transitioned the Mac to Intel-based chips, Apple’s Boot Camp multi-boot utility is the secret sauce that has allowed the Mac to be the best-selling PC on Earth.

The proposition Boot Camp offers to would-be Mac buyers is simple. If they buy a Mac, they can run any OS they want: OS X, Windows, or Linux. But if they buy any other laptop, they can never run OS X.

With the release of the latest MacBook Pros, though, Boot Camp just got a little less flexible. Apple has dropped support for Windows 7 from the 2015 MacBook Pro.