Connect Mac and TV over an ultrafast wireless connection with Hyper Mirror [Review]

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LikPok Hyper Mirror review
The tiny Hyper Mirror transmitter sends high-speed video from your Mac to an external display. It can plug into a bulkier USB-C adapter.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

The LikPok Hyper Mirror saves you the hassle of stringing wires between your computer and TV. It makes a wireless connection instead, using the extremely fast mmWave technology normally found in 5G networks rather than Wi-Fi.

Read on for the results of my tests with this replacement for HDMI cables.

LikPok Hyper Mirror review

There’s a clear need for a wireless alternative to video cables. Too many living rooms have these stretched between a laptop and a TV, ready to be tripped over and fling the computer to the ground. The same is true for conference rooms.

Hyper Mirror can be that replacement. With limitations, of course.

Design

This product is made up of two major components: a transmitter and a receiver. Each of these comes with accessories. The whole setup is five pieces of kit and three cables. All are black, with a design that includes a lot of straight edges and corners with not a curve to be seen.

Transmitter

The transmitter is surprisingly small at 1.7 inches by 0.8 in. by 0.3 in. That’s not including the built-in HDMI connector.

But Hyper Mirror can be connected to USB-C ports too. LikPok includes an adapter that holds the transmitter and includes a pair of USB-C ports. One connects to your computer and the other to a power source.

This adapter includes a springy clip and is designed to attach to the back of a phone. This isn’t much use to iPhone owners though, as iOS handsets don’t have USB-C ports.

But LikPok thought of this. It also includes a small foldable stand to hold the Hyper Mirror transmitter in the adapter. It looks odd, but it works. And isjust as useful when transmitting video from a MacBook.

LikPok Hyper Mirror fits in an adapter and sits in a table stand.
There’s a metal stand to hold the Hyper Mirror in its USB-C adapter.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

That said, unless you’re clipping the USB-C adapter to a phone, it’s bulky and awkward. If you have another USB-C to HDMI adapter, use it instead.

Receiver

The Hyper Mirror receiver is 3.1 inches by 1.8 in. by 0.6 inches. On the bottom edge is a mini HDMI port and a USB-C port for power. To set it up, attach the first one to the HDMI port on your screen with the supplied cable, and the second goes to the USB port on your TV.

A clip attaches the receiver to the side of your TV — a necessary step. It can handle screens that are up to an inch thick.

LikPok Hyper Mirror performance

There are plenty of wireless video transmitters that use Wi-Fi, but the LikPok Hyper Mirror uses mmWave frequencies instead. This allows for a much faster connection between your computer and TV.

This device offers 2K (2048 by 1080 pixel) video at 60 frames per second. That’s not 4K, but far less than half of TVs are 4K.

LikPok promises “zero latency.” In my tests, it certainly approaches that. I’m able to play games without any noticeable delays between the controller and what’s happening on the screen.

No other network needs to be available. Not Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or anything. In my tests, I can connect the two components to their respective devices and they’ll start communicating in less than 10 seconds.

Plus, Hyper Mirror offers broad compatibility. There’s no software to install on your computer. This peripheral acts just like an HDMI cable, or a USB-C one. If your computer supports video through one of these formats, it can be used with Hyper Mirror.

Between myself and Killian Bell, we were able to use the accessory with a MacBook, iPad Pro, iPhone and even a Nintendo Switch. Of these, only the MacBook was compatible with LikPok’s USB-C adapter. For the iPad and iPhone, other HDMI adapters were required.

But Killian ran into problems with two UK TVs that won’t communicate with Hyper Mirror’s receiver. He and LikPok are trying to work out what’s going on. I had no such problems in the US.

LikPok Hyper Mirror receiver can’t be hidden.
The Hyper Mirror receiver must clip to the side of your TV. There’s no avoiding it.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Downsides

mmWave is fast. But it offers virtually no penetration through objects. The Hyper Mirror receiver must clip to the side of your TV because it requires a line-of-sight connection with the transmitter. It will not function behind the screen. Just putting my hand between the two interrupts the connection.

And it’s also short range. LikPok says the maximum distance between transmitter and receiver is about 15 feet.

LikPok Hyper Mirror final thoughts

Cables are an eyesore. Wireless is so much better. The LikPok Hyper Mirror provides a fast, wireless connection between a wide variety of devices and screens. It works well for movies or games.

But the need for a line-of-sight connection means your TV has to have this gadget attached to one side.

Pricing

Hyper Mirror is currently being sold on the crowd-funding site Kickstarter. It’s already been fully funded so the project is moving ahead. It’s scheduled to begin shipping in August 2020.

Buy from: Kickstarter

The “Early Bird” price is $109, and later it’ll be $119.

Comparable products

Rival replacements for HDMI cables are already on the market. IOGear SharePro Mini uses Wi-Fi frequencies but doesn’t require a hotspot. The suggested price is $119.95.

And there’s a USB-C version, the IOGear Share Pro. This is easier to use with a MacBook or iPad Pro. It’s $159.05.

LikPok provided Cult of Mac with a review unit for this article. See our reviews policy, and check out more in-depth reviews of Apple-related items.