Skyle is an iPad Pro accessory that lets you navigate using eye-tracking

By

Skyle is an iPad Pro accessory that lets you navigate with your eyes
Making the iPad Pro accessible to a new market.
Photo: Skyle

For most people, tap and swipe-based gestures are the perfect way to navigate on an iPad. That’s not true for everyone, however. This is why the makers of a new eye-tracking system called Skyle have developed this innovative iPad Pro accessory.

Built with the accessibility audience in mind, the system lets users insert their 12.9-inch iPad Pro into a smart protective case, plug in an eye tracker, and then use a special Skyle app to navigate their iPad with nothing more than well-placed glances.

According to the manufacturers, the scanner system uses a pair of eye-tracking methods. These include dark pupil tracking and binocular tracking; between which they claim it’s possible to accurately determine what a user is looking at. The device also includes a built-in switch port. Thanks to this, users can carry out actions such as taps, double-taps and tap-and-hold gestures that would usually be done by pressing on the screen.

“Skyle has been specifically created to utilize the power of the iPad Pro, turning it into an [Augmentative and Alternative Communication] device that can be controlled completely with your eyes,” notes developer Inclusive Technology. “[This makes] it the perfect solution for independent access, and augmentative and alternative communication.”

Skyle lets you use your iPad with eye-tracking

Combined with a feature like Voice Control, introduced with iOS 13, this could help make the iPad an even better tool for differently abled individuals. Apple has long pushed accessibility as one of its core goals as a company. Eye-tracking is a technology I’ve read about for some time. Apple has filed a few patents related to it. I’ve even seen some approximation of it on iOS, although nothing as sophisticated as this system appears to be.

If you want to find more details about Skyle, you can visit the company’s website here. The system costs $2,995, plus the cost an iPad Pro and, if you require it, a table mount.

Via: New Atlas