Apple premieres See for TV+ in California

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See-premiere
See will be available on Apple TV+ starting November 1.
Photo: Apple

At Monday’s premiere of See, star Jason Momoa called his role in the upcoming Apple TV+ series “challenging, beautiful” and his “favorite role to date.”

The Game of Thrones star, who attended the Los Angeles premiere with his wife, Lisa Bonet, praised the original premise of the fantasy show. “It’s a world we’ve never seen before,” Momoa said, “and in a world that everything has been done, this is something very new and fresh.”

See takes place in the distant future after a deadly virus decimates the human race. The few survivors are left blind, until twins are born centuries later with the ability to see.

Momoa’s character, Baba Voss, father of the twins, must protect them and his tribe against a desperate queen who wants the twins killed.

See stars turn out for premiere

Apple held the premiere at the Regency Village Theater in Westwood, California. The company plans to launch its Apple TV+ streaming service on November 1 with an expanding slate of original programming.

See is written and created by Steven Knight and directed by Francis Lawrence. The show stars Alfie Woodard, Hera Hilmar, Sylvia Hoeks, Christian Camargo, Archie Madekwe, Nesta Cooper and Yadira Guevara-Prip. Apple proudly points out that many of the show’s cast and crew are blind or visually impaired.

See is the third Apple show to get a public premiere, following For All Mankind, also at the Regency Village Theater, and Dickinson in Brooklyn, New York. We expect other TV+ exclusives to premiere ahead of their debut in a little under two weeks.

See hits Apple TV+ on November 1

You’ll be able to watch the first three episodes of See on November 1 when Apple TV+ goes live in more than 100 countries. New episodes will follow weekly, every Friday.

Apple TV+ will cost $4.99 a month for up to six family members. But those who purchase eligible Apple devices this fall will get to enjoy the service free for the first year.

Source: Sutton & Croydon Guardian