Apple meets with U.S. intelligence to talk fake news

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Apple News
Apple has already taken steps to fight fake news.
Photo: Apple

Apple is among the tech companies which recently met with members of the U.S. intelligence community to discuss the upcoming midterm elections.

Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Oath, Snap and Twitter were approached because of continued concerns about the way that tech platforms were allegedly used for spreading fake news during the 2016 Presidential elections.

The atmosphere of the meeting — which took place last month — was described as “tense,” with the information that was shared being one-sided. The central concerns are about the possible infiltration of Russian bots on various online platforms for the purpose of buying divisive ads, posting unflattering images, and sharing fake news.

Not all of the tech companies involved with the meeting have been singled out as having links with this threat, but a number have. In particular, Facebook, Google and Twitter have been investigated by Congress for their part in allowing this news dissemination to take place.

Apple’s midterm election coverage

Interestingly, one month after the meeting, Apple this week debuted new tools to share news about the upcoming midterm election. The new Apple News feature aggregates election news from a variety of “trustworthy” places and “reliable sources.” To access the feature, you need to tap on the banner across the top of the “For You” tab. Stories will also be highlighted on Apple News’ “Top Stories” and “Spotlight” tab.

“Today more than ever people want information from reliable sources, especially when it comes to making voting decisions,” said Lauren Kern, editor-in-chief of Apple News, in a statement. “An election is not just a contest; it should raise conversations and spark national discourse. By presenting quality news from trustworthy sources and curating a diverse range of opinions, Apple News aims to be a responsible steward of those conversations and help readers understand the candidates and the issues.”

Source: New York Times