virus

’CrescentCore’ malware attacks your Mac, evades antivirus tools

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CrescentCore-Flash-update
Don’t install Flash Player. Not even the real one.
Photo: Intego

Security researches have discovered new malware that targets macOS users and evades popular antivirus tools.

“CrescentCore” is distributed as a DMG package that’s disguised as Adobe Flash Player. It can now be found on multiple websites — one of which is “a high-ranking Google search result,” according to Intego.

Virus briefly halts production at iPhone chip-maker TSMC

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Apple A12 replaces A11 Bionic
TSMC, the company that manufactures all iPhone and iPad processors, including the A11, had a serious virus problem this weekend.
Photo: iFixit

A computer virus infected the fabrication tools and computers at TSMC’s factories that are likely producing Apple’s next-generation iPhone processors. 

The company is still cleaning the malware off its equipment, but expects to be finished by tomorrow.

Chrome adds Windows Defender to protect your Mac

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Windows Defender Google Chrome
Windows Defender is now available inside Google Chrome.
Photo: Microsoft

Windows Defender, which protects Windows 10 PCs from malware, can now keep your Mac safe from inside Google Chrome.

Microsoft has turned its antivirus app into a Chrome extension that promises to detect phishing links in your emails and dodgy sites that distribute malicious software. It’s 99 percent effective, according to Microsoft, which makes Windows Defender better than rival browser protections.

Intel speeds up chips by offloading virus scans

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Intel will task GPUs with antivirus scanning.
Photo: Intel

Intel plans to offload virus scanning to improve the performance of its processors.

It will allow antivirus programs to use its integrated graphics chipsets when scanning for attacks, which will reduce processor and power consumption on some machines. It could mean that you’ll get more use out of your MacBook in between charges.

OSX.Bella trojan discovered installing backdoors into Macs

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15 inch MacBook Pro Silver
It might be time to update your passwords again.
Photo: Apple

Security researchers have discovered a nasty bit of Mac malware similar to OSX.Dok trojan, which can bypass Apple’s GateKeeper feature.

The new bug, dubbed OSX.Bella, behaves and distributes itself in a completely different manner than OSX.Dok. But once installed, it executes a script that’s just as damaging.

Mac malware skyrockets 744 percent in 2016

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Mac attacks are on the up!
Mac attacks are on the up!
Photo: Cult of Mac

Still think your Mac is immune to malware? Think again.

According to the latest Threats Report (.pdf) from McAfee Labs, the number of malware attacks on Mac skyrocketed by 744 percent in 2016. The increase was mostly as a result of adware, which isn’t too harmful — but it’s still software you don’t want lurking on your Mac.

Russian Mac malware steals passwords and iPhone backups

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That fancy new Touch Bar could be dead already.
But there's (probably) no need to panic.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Still think your Mac is immune from viruses? Think again.

Just a week after a new strain of Mac malware was found hidden inside malicious Microsoft Word macros, security researchers have discovered sophisticated new software from Russian hackers that targets your saved passwords and iPhone backups.

Find out if you’ve been infected by sneaky new Mac malware

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Have you been infected?
Have you been infected?
Photo: Marcin Nowak/Unsplash

Is your Mac infected by newly discovered malware that was ostensibly created by Milan-based HackingTeam in order to gain remote access to your machine?

The new virus uses some old HackingTeam code and some new tricks to hide its tracks, but it’s mostly harmless, according to researchers.

That doesn’t mean it’s not a good idea to get it off your system. Here’s how.

Get One Year of Digital Security With The Mac Premium Security Bundle [Deals]

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Seasoned Mac users know that their computers aren’t immune to malware, viruses, and other privacy violators. But new Mac users may still be hearing the old myth that Macs are immune to the evils of the Internet.

This Cult of Mac Deals offer aims to help out both the new and seasoned Mac user with one year of digital security with The Mac Premium Security Bundle. We’ve got it available for only $49.99 for a limited time – a savings of 64%!

Are “Beneficial Viruses” The Future Of Mobile Security?

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Could viruses actually protect company data on an iPhone or iPad?

The BYOD movement has transformed the relationship between IT staffers and other employees in a wide range of companies. While there are benefits to BYOD, there are also headaches – and securing data on personal devices and/or securing the devices themselves is one of the biggest. While there’s an ongoing discussion about whether to manage data, apps, or devices, right now most companies are developing a strategy that has a mix of approaches.

All that could change if the mobile management industry unfolds the way Gartner analyst Ken Dulaney expects. Dulaney is an advocate of creating what he calls “beneficial viruses” that companies can layer into apps and data itself – the idea being that the data could delete itself if it becomes compromised.

Five Major Lessons IT Needs To Learn From The Flashback Fiasco

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Flashback threat may be fading, but companies shouldn't get complacent about Mac malware
Flashback threat may be fading, but companies shouldn't get complacent about Mac malware

With the number of Flashback-infected Macs dwindling more each day and Apple’s release of software updates that can both clean an infected Mac and prevent infection or reinfection, it’s easy for IT departments and individual Mac users to think that the crisis has passed. That doesn’t mean that it’s time to forget about the issue of malware targeting Macs, however. In fact, the entire event has been a wakeup call to IT and security professionals as well as to the wider Mac community – Macs are not invincible.

When reflecting on the Flashback events of the past couple of weeks, there are five major themes or lessons for businesses and IT department to consider when it comes to supporting Macs going forward.

Apple Suffers More Vulnerabilities Than Google, Microsoft, Adobe In Last Quarter

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This Apple's software is free from vulnerabilities? You couldn't be more wrong.
Think Apple's software is free from vulnerabilities? You couldn't be more wrong.

Apple’s operating systems and its software are generally believed to be the best available in terms of security and stability, but a new report from Trend Micro reveals that’s a huge misconception… at least in recent months. In fact, the Cupertino company suffered more vulnerabilities during the last quarter than rivals like Oracle, Google, Adobe, and even Microsoft.

Macs Infected With Flashback Drop To 140,000 After Apple Releases Removal Tool [Report]

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Apple has crippled Flashback significantly, and the number of infected users is dropping rapidly.
Apple has crippled Flashback significantly, but many Mac users have not yet taken action to remove the trojan.

The notorious Flashback trojan infected 600,000 Macs over the last year. We’ve been following Flashback closely, and Apple started waging its war on the botnet earlier this month. After releasing two security updates and one final tool to remove Flashback from infected Macs, Apple has nearly killed Flashback once and for all.

According to new research from Norton Symantec research, Flashback now infects around 140,000 Macs. That’s a significant drop considering Apple’s removal tool was only released 4 days ago.

Why Intel Says Your Next Macbook Pro May Have A Retina Display [CultCast Discussion]

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Episode 8 of The CultCast is in iTunes now, and if you’re itching for a new Macbook Pro, you’re not going to want to miss it.

Join us and special guest, Ars Technica Writer Chris Foresman, as we reveal the secrets of the rumored new Air-like Macbook Pro, and explain why Intel says it could pack a Retina Display; and Facebook just bought Instagram, is now the time to jump ship?

All that and lots more on this week’s CultCast — subscribe now on iTunes!

Flashback Trojan – A Big Wake Up Call For Mac IT Pros

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Macs in business that don't include centrally managed antivirus protection maybe time bombs waiting to go off
Business Macs that don't include centrally managed antivirus protection may be ticking time bombs

The after effects of the Flashback Trojan are going to be felt for a long time to come. Although there’s been the occasional Mac malware announcement over the past few years, none was ever found to be rampant in the wilds of the Internet. Most were easily avoided by Apple’s basic security elements or by simple user actions like telling Safari not to immediately open so-called “safe” files after downloading them.

As a result, the Flashback Trojan caught a lot of people off guard – including individual Mac owners and some IT professionals who ought to have known better. It also highlighted deficiencies on the part of Apple when it comes to security.

Apple Issues Second Java Update In Two Days Following Infection Of 600,000 Macs

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Keep Java updated on your Mac to eliminate threats from the Flashback trojan.
Keep Java updated on your Mac to eliminate threats from the Flashback trojan.

Apple has issued a second update to Java in just two days this week as the company works to patch vulnerabilities that have led to the infection of over 600,000 Macs. The Java for OS 2012-002 update is now available to download via Software Update, and it’s recommended that you update.

Is Your Mac Infected By The Flashback Trojan Affecting 600,000 Macs?

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This Apple's software is free from vulnerabilities? You couldn't be more wrong.
Your Mac could be one of the 600,000 infected by malware. Here's how to check.

A Mac infected by a virus used to be something of a rarity, and it was the best argument you could bring to a Mac versus PC debate. But with Mac adoption surging in recent years, it was inevitable that Apple’s operating system would become a target for hackers.

Variations of one Flashback trojan, which first surfaced back in 2007, are now affecting more than 600,000 Macs around the world. Here’s how to find out whether your machine’s affected and kill the malware.

Spies Can Officially Start Using iOS Says Australian Government

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missionimpossible
Real-life Ethan Hunts have been officially approved to use an iPhone

We’ve already seen some pretty crazy uses of the iPad and iPhone in spy movies, but it looks like iOS is getting an official nod of approval as a mobile operating system worthy to be used in spy games. The Australian government just approved iPhones and iPads to be used for the storing and sharing of classified documents, meaning Ethan Hunt wannabes Down Under can look even more bad ass in their espionage attempts.

‘Flashback.G’ Trojan Is Infecting Macs With Older Java Runtime Software To Steal Your Personal Data

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java-certificate-flashback-trojan

Intego, the company behind the popular VirusBarrier security software for the Mac, has uncovered a new trojan horse called ‘Flashback.G’ that infects Macs running older versions of Java Runtime. The software installs itself on your system without your acknowledgement when you visit a malicious webpage, then it will record usernames and passwords for sites like Google, eBay, PayPal, and more.

Only 12 Hours Left On Our Discounted Deal For Internet Security Barrier X6 [Deals]

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There are only 12 hours left on the Mac Security suite, Internet Security Barrier X6 brought to you by Deals.CultofMac.

Mac usage has soared, and now hackers are targeting our brushed aluminum devices too. You’ve got your trojan viruses, macro worms, malware programs, and let’s not forget the good ol’ polymorphic virus! Another day in the Mac Jungle equals another chance of a cyber-thug trying to break down your stack with viruses, malware, worms, and trojans.

We’re very excited for the opportunity to offer you the best-in-breed virus protection software for Macs. Please do your homework: look it up, do a Google search – you’ll see that everyone says the same thing: “Internet Security Bundle X6 from Intego (which comes with a total of 5 virus-busting apps including the award-winning Virus Barrier X6) is the best virus protection for Mac. Period.”