Respected analyst says everyone’s too pessimistic about Apple

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Long-term iPhone XR demand could eventually lead to greater sales than the iPhone XS.
A reliable analyst says 2019 iPhone sales won‘t be great but won‘t be disasterous either.
Photo: Apple

Ming-Chi Kuo, a tech analyst with a decent record for accuracy, predicts Apple will sell more iPhones in 2019 than many other analysts are anticipating.

To be clear, Kuo isn’t predicting a banner year for iPhone sales. Just not a terrible one.

High prices are killing iPhone in China

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Chinese iPhone shoppers have gone from thrilled to shocked at prices, leaving Apple crying.
Chinese iPhone shoppers have gone from thrilled to shocked at prices, leaving Apple crying.
Photo: Apple/Cult of Mac

The Chinese phone market cratered in the final quarter of 2018, but iPhone sales in the country did even worse.

This poor showing is primarily a result of the high prices Apple charges for its handsets, according to an industry analyst.

Weak Chinese economy is dragging down iPhone, Fed says

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iPhone in China
iPhone sales are slowing because the Chinese economy is, not because Apple made a dud.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Sales of iPhones seem to be weaker than in previous years, and the Chairman of the Federal Reserve has an explanation: a drop in consumer spending in China.

The implication is that the slowdown in iPhone sales isn’t a result of anything Apple has done.

White House wonk says China ‘picked off’ Apple IP

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Larry Kudlow
Tim Cook meeting an iPhone manufacturer in China.
Photo: Apple

A White House official said today China is stealing Apple technology secrets but did not provide specific details.

National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow made the comment during a wide-ranging interview with Bloomberg that included U.S. trade tensions with China.

See the new iOS animation that could save Apple’s bacon in China

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With an iPhone in China, apps close by shrinking, not by sliding off the screen.
With an iPhone in China, apps close by shrinking, not by sliding off the screen.
Screenshot: Joe Rossignol/YouTube

There’s now proof that Apple rushed iOS 12.1.2 out primarily to make changes to iPhones in China.  We also have confirmation of exactly what the modifications are.

These were designed to convince a Chinese court that iPhones don’t infringe on two Qualcomm patents.  The hope is that court will then reverse an iPhone sales ban that went into effect in that country last week.

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The Chinese market is very important to Apple.
The Chinese market is very important to Apple.
Photo: Apple

Inside Apple’s billion-dollar war on repair fraud

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Cult of Mac's buyback program pays good money for your gear, even broken ones.
Chinese iPhone fraud involved removing components from devices then deliberately breaking them so Apple would replace the handset.
Photo: Warren R.M. Stuart/Flickr CC

Fraudulent iPhone repair claims are big business in China. To the point where about 60 percent of the handsets being repaired under warranty in that country were part of scams.

Apple has had to make draconian efforts to even slow the rate at which Chinese criminal gangs are stealing from it.

Chinese company could compete with Samsung on OLED iPhone screens

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BOE Technology Group already makes LCDs for Apple, and this Chinese company now wants to produce OLED iPhone screens.
BOE Technology Group already makes LCDs for Apple, and this Chinese company now wants to produce OLED iPhone screens.
Photo: BOE Technology Group

One of the most important components of the 2018 iPhone could be produced by a company with very strong ties to the Chinese government.

BOE Technology Group already makes some LCD screens for Apple, but also wants to manufacture OLED displays used in flagship iPhone models.

iPhone shipments up significantly in China

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iPhone in China
It was a great quarter for iPhone in China, with shipments up dramatically.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Shipments of iPhone in China increased 32 percent in the first quarter of this year. This was during a period when the overall Chinese handset market declined. 

Many Chinese see Apple devices as status symbols and pick them over local brands that cost significantly less.