Apple asks retail employees to help with online customer support

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Like everyone else, Apple retail employees are being asked to work online.
Apple retail employees are being asked to become online employees to make using Apple.com better for customers.
Photo: Apple

Deirdre O’Brien, Apple’s retail boss, sent a video to retail employees this weekend asking them to sign up to help customers remotely. She also said they should expect store closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to continue “for some period of time.”

Separately, Apple told employees that it doesn’t expect to have everyone back in its corporate headquarters before the end of 2020.

Apple to bring essential staff back to offices in phased return

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Apple leases new offices near to Apple Park
Apple employees will return to work in a phased approach.
Photo: Duncan Sinfield

Apple reportedly plans to gradually return its corporate employees to work over the next few months, likely starting with those focused on major hardware projects.

The phased plan will return thousands of Apple workers to locations around the world, including the company’s main campus in Silicon Valley, Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

Apple CEO tells employees he’s ‘optimistic’ in ‘stressful’ times

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Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off a face shield Apple is making for medical workers.
Apple CEO Tim Cook has been working from home during the COVID-19 crisis. He addressed Apple employees in a virtual town hall today.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

In a virtual meeting with employees on Thursday, Apple CEO Tim Cook admitted that COVID-19 makes for an “uncertain and stressful” time, but he’s optimistic about the future.

Cook hosted Apple-wide meeting that let workers pose questions to Apple’s CEO about the effects COVID-19 is having on the company.

Larry Tesler, the Apple employee who invented cut, copy and paste, dies at 74

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Larry Tesler
Larry Tesler worked for Apple from 1980 through 1997.
Photo: Yahoo!

Larry Tesler, a pioneering computer scientist who worked at Apple from 1980 to 1997 and created computerized cut, copy and paste, died Monday at the age of 74.

Tesler served as VP of AppleNet and Apple’s Advanced Technology Group. During his time at Apple, he played a key role in the development of products ranging from the Lisa to the Newton MessagePad.

And that was just the tip of the iceberg when it came to his contribution to computing.

Dropcam founder reportedly leaving Apple

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Dropcam image
The guy who popularized home Wi-Fi cameras supposedly checks out of Cupertino.
Photo: Dropcam

Dropcam founder Greg Duffy, who went to Apple in 2017 to work on special projects, has reportedly left the company.

Google acquired Wi-Fi home camera company Dropcam in 2014. However, Duffy fell out with ex-Apple employee and Nest co-founder Tony Fadell, who managed the Dropcam team. Duffy left Google in 2015, and later labeled Fadell a “tyrant bureaucrat.”

Apple employees think they make the world a better place

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Apple leases new offices near to Apple Park
Apple leases new offices near to Apple Park
Photo: Duncan Sinfield

A majority of Apple employees believe their company is making the world a better place, according to a survey by the anonymous workplace app Bind.

Blind sent its base a single True-False question – I believe my company is making the world a better place – and nearly 67 percent out of 10,589 Silicon Valley workers responded in the affirmative.

Nearly a quarter of Apple employees plan to delete Facebook accounts

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Facebook data breach
Some Apple employees are thinking of deleting their Facebook accounts.
Photo: Cult of Mac

The recent Facebook data breach freaked out several Apple employees enough for them to consider deleting their accounts, according to an anonymous survey of tech employees by the app Blind.

Of 256 Apple employees who responded to Blind’s survey, 22 percent said they will close out their Facebook accounts, while another 20 percent said they were not on Facebook.

Even a fat Apple paycheck won’t buy an overpriced Bay Area house

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Apple salaries
Hardware engineers at Apple's Cupertino campus.
Photo: Apple

Your fantasy about working in Cupertino probably leads you to believe the pay is good. You would be correct, but according to more than half of the developers and supervisors at Apple, even their fat paychecks aren’t not enough to afford a house in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Some 60 percent of Apple workers, as surveyed by anonymous messaging app Blind, say home prices are too spendy even with salaries that exceed the national average by more than double.

Apple Store employee restores faith in humanity with simple act

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Sometimes, people get it right.
Sometimes people get it right.
Photo: LynnMarie Rink

When LynnMarie Rink and her son, James, got to the Nashville Apple Store to replace his broken iPad last week, they weren’t expecting anything unusual. Of course, for James and his mom, atypical is their way of life.

James has Down syndrome and autism, and uses his iPad to communicate. When he got to the Apple Store last Thursday, he got excited at something out in the mall and ran out of the store at top speed. Unfortunately, there was a big glass wall instead of a door in front of him, and he ran into it face first, causing a little scene with tears and a fat lip.

It was just then that an Apple Store employee came up and offered to help them get their new iPad — and did something amazingly gracious.