Photos from WWDC22: Apple Park, the Apple Developer Center and more

Photos from WWDC22: Apple Park, the Apple Developer Center and more

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Looking back through the doors from outside.
Developers, students and press enjoyed a rare opportunity to visit the Apple Park campus during WWDC22.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
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CUPERTINO, California — For the first time, a big group of developers, students and media were allowed inside the very heart of Apple’s spaceship HQ during WWDC22.

The central office building, known as the Ring, is bigger than the Pentagon. Teams at Apple move in and out between other buildings as projects change — I met several ARKit engineers who recently moved in and were a bit vague on what they were working on. Interesting.

Previously, members of the media had been escorted to the Steve Jobs Theater for press events, which is another building off to the side of the sprawling Apple Park campus. However, the theater would have been much too small to fit the 1,000 developers, 350 students and hundreds of employees attending the WWDC22 keynote viewing party.

This special day for developers — an invitation-only, in-person event at this year’s Apple Worldwide Developers Conference — marked a big step in Apple’s efforts to boost developer trust. Apple also gave attendees a first look at the new Apple Developer Center located just across the street from the Ring.

See the full gallery below for more than 80 pictures of Apple’s campus.

Apple Developer Center Tour on Sunday

Around 10 a.m., I arrived at Apple Park. Walking north up Tantau Avenue, I walked past the Developer Center to check in at the Apple Park Visitor Center.

One side of the Visitor’s Center has a coffee shop.
Walking by the Apple Park Visitor Center, you can see the coffee shop. Employees served attendees breakfast from wooden trays of lattes and doughnuts.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The back side of the Visitor Center is an Apple Store where you can buy exclusive Apple-branded shirts and merchandise.
The back side of the Visitor Center is an Apple Store where you can buy exclusive Apple-branded shirts and merchandise.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Apple employees in yellow shirts lined the sidewalk at about every 10 feet. The crowd control was immaculate and rehearsed. After a group of about 10 people gathered, we were led to the Apple Developer Center to begin our tour.

Device testing room

The tour of the Apple Developer Center starts in the hardware testing room. This room lets developers test their apps on devices they might not own, like Apple Watch. This room has a TV screen and cubicles with 24 iMacs.
The tour of the Apple Developer Center starts in the hardware testing room. This room lets developers test their apps on devices they might not own, like Apple Watch. This room has a TV screen and cubicles with 24 iMacs.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

AR testing room

In the AR testing room, Apple presented sketches and concepts of an app that offers an interactive look inside the Statue of Liberty. These are drawings on a whiteboard.
In the AR testing room, Apple presented sketches and concepts of an app that offers an interactive look inside the Statue of Liberty. These are drawings on a whiteboard.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Sketches and concepts in the AR testing room.
Sketches and concepts in the AR testing room.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

The table in the AR testing room has design concept sketches alongside screenshots of the final product.

Presentation room

The presentation room has artwork from Alba, an Apple Design Award winner. The room has frosted glass walls (behind me, not pictured) to let in natural light while maintaining privacy. I asked what the contents of the cabinets are, and the tour guide opened them to reveal they are empty.
The presentation room has artwork from Alba, an Apple Design Award winner. The room has frosted glass walls (behind me, not pictured) to let in natural light while maintaining privacy. I asked what the contents of the cabinets are, and the tour guide opened them to reveal they are empty.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The presentation room has sofas and a TV in addition to the conference table.
The presentation room has sofas and a TV in addition to the conference table.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Accessory testing room

The accessory testing room features cases and MagSafe accessories on the tables.
The accessory testing room features cases and MagSafe accessories on the tables.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The whiteboards in here feature the most technically impressive diagrams yet, with very precise iPhone and MagSafe line art.
The whiteboards in here feature the most technically impressive diagrams yet, with very precise iPhone and MagSafe line art.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
This room has a TV as well.
This room has a TV as well.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Back room

The back room is a control center and storage room for the Apple Developer Center. My fellow attendees look shocked because we have just been told the Developer Center has more than 66 miles of cable running underneath the building's raised floor.
The back room is a control center and storage room for the Apple Developer Center. My fellow attendees look shocked because we have just been told the Developer Center has more than 66 miles of cable running underneath the building’s raised floor.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
An unexpected find in this room was a Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh.
An unexpected find in this room was a Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh. It is a machine that even I, a vintage Macintosh connoisseur, have never seen in-person before.
These hatches give you access to cables running throughout the building.
These hatches give you access to cables running throughout the building.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Hanging on a chair in the back room is a WWDC20 jacket that was never distributed. The event was canceled and moved to online-only due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Hanging on a chair in the back room is a WWDC20 jacket that was never distributed. The event was canceled and moved to online-only due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Hallways

The fire extinguishers at the Apple Developer Center are hidden behind a silver door marked with a black icon. It looks like an SF Symbol.
The fire extinguishers at the Apple Developer Center are hidden behind a silver door marked with a black icon. It looks like an SF Symbol.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Lockers in the halls offer visiting developers a place to lock their belongings.
Lockers in the halls offer visiting developers a place to stash their belongings.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The Exit signs have a neat optical illusion. At a glance, they appear to be transparent glass. But when you look at the opposite side, “Exit” isn’t reversed -- it reads normally. They’re not actually transparent, though. They’re mirrored. They look transparent because the ceiling lines are so consistent.
The Exit signs have a neat optical illusion. At a glance, they appear to be transparent glass. But when you look at the opposite side, “Exit” isn’t reversed — it reads normally. They’re not actually transparent, though. They’re mirrored. They look transparent because the ceiling lines are so consistent.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The back side of the same Exit sign.
The back side of the same exit sign.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
All of the rooms at the Apple Developer Center are named after versions of OS X and macOS. El Capitan is the meeting room, up next. The E in this "El Capitan" sign was originally slightly askew, <a href="https://twitter.com/sdw/status/1533591183259103232">but it was corrected</a> by <a href="https://apps.apple.com/us/app/halide/id885697368">Halide</a> developer (and Apple Design Award winner) Sebastiaan de With.
All of the rooms at the Apple Developer Center are named after versions of OS X and macOS. El Capitan is the meeting room, up next. The E in this “El Capitan” sign was originally slightly askew, but it was corrected by Halide developer (and Apple Design Award winner) Sebastiaan de With.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Meeting room

The meeting room features a giant TV with cameras in every corner and a large U-shaped conference table.
The meeting room features a giant TV with cameras in every corner and a large U-shaped conference table.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The cabinets on the back wall feature trash and recycling. The icons are both SF Symbols.
The cabinets on the back wall feature trash and recycling. The icons are both SF Symbols.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Big Sur Theater

After touring the various rooms, we were led to the last room of the tour, the Big Sur Theater.

The video station in the Big Sur Theater's control room.
The video station in the Big Sur Theater’s control room.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Another control panel in the Big Sur Theater control room.
Another control panel in the Big Sur Theater control room.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

"The Talk Show Live</a>. Two lounge chairs sit to the right of the stage. They can be brought out to the center of the stage for events like The Talk Show Live.[/caption]

A close-up look at a pair of seats in the Big Sure Theater at the Apple Developer Center. They are comfortable, but a bit narrow.
A close-up look at a pair of seats in the Big Sure Theater at the Apple Developer Center. They are comfortable, but a bit narrow.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Detail of the stage lighting rig.
Detail of the stage lighting rig.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Technology evangelist Josh Tidsbury spoke to attendees of the tour. He detailed the advanced features of the Big Sur Theater. For example, the video screen can combine up to 12 different inputs -- device screens, live cameras and prerecorded video, in any combination and permutation.
Technology evangelist Josh Tidsbury spoke to attendees of the tour. He detailed the advanced features of the Big Sur Theater. For example, the video screen can combine up to 12 different inputs — device screens, live cameras and prerecorded video, in any combination and permutation.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

After the tour of the Developer Center, I went back to the Visitor Center to have a look around.

The Apple Park Visitor Center

On the far end of the Apple Park Visitor Center is this huge, stunning model of the Apple Park campus.

This aluminum model of the Apple Park campus, designed by Jony Ive, weighs several thousand pounds.
This aluminum model of the Apple Park campus, designed by Jony Ive, weighs several thousand pounds.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
All of the buildings on the main Apple Park campus are modeled.
All of the buildings on the main Apple Park campus are modeled.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The model sits on a strong, custom stand made of steel.
The model sits on a strong, custom stand made of steel.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Visitors are handed an iPad running a custom app. When you scan the model, the app uses ARKit to superimpose a big, animated 3D simulation of the campus.

If you tap on the barn, Clarus the Dogcow is revealed.
If you tap on the barn, Clarus the Dogcow is revealed.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Going upstairs

The staircase in the Visitor Center is very similar to the stairs in Apple Park and the Developer Center.
The staircase in the Visitor Center is very similar to the stairs in Apple Park and the Developer Center.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
This large curtain is made of paper. Behind it are some boxes of shirts.
This large curtain is made of paper. Behind it are some boxes of shirts.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A firehose is hidden behind a panel in the wall. I checked -- the panel was locked.
A firehose is hidden behind a panel in the wall. I checked — the panel was locked.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A panoramic picture of Apple Park from the Visitor Center patio. An Apple employee directed me to stand in just the right spot when taking the photo so the resulting panorama would look like an eye.
A panoramic picture of Apple Park from the Visitor Center patio. An Apple employee directed me to stand in just the right spot when taking the photo so the resulting panorama would look like an eye.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

The Apple Park Store

The back side of the Visitor Center houses an Apple Store that sells exclusive items.

This creative display uses AirPods as musical notes on the wall of the Visitor Center store.
This creative display uses AirPods as musical notes on the wall of the Visitor Center store.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
All six colors of iMac on are on display in the store. The purple one looks especially stunning.
All six colors of iMac on are on display in the store. The purple one looks especially stunning.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A table of desktop Macs. Going clockwise around the table, starting at the front: the Mac Studio with Studio Display (height-adjustable stand and nano-texture glass), the iMac, Mac Pro with Pro Display XDR (with Pro Stand) and Mac mini with Studio Display (tilt stand).
A table of desktop Macs. Going clockwise around the table, starting at the front: the Mac Studio with Studio Display (height-adjustable stand and nano-texture glass), the iMac, Mac Pro with Pro Display XDR (with Pro Stand) and Mac mini with Studio Display (tilt stand).
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Comparison between the iMac (left) and Studio Display (height-adjustable stand in front, tilt stand to the rear).
Comparison between the iMac (left) and Studio Display (height-adjustable stand in front, tilt stand to the rear).
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A Pride display for Apple Watch.
A Pride display for Apple Watch.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The parking garage underneath the Apple Park campus looks unremarkable.
The parking garage underneath the Apple Park campus looks unremarkable.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Monday at Apple Park

The big day at Apple Park was finally upon us Monday.

Outside the Ring

View of Apple Park from the sidewalk.
View of Apple Park from the sidewalk.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The security pod outside an Apple Park gate.
The security pod outside an Apple Park gate.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Through the gates

After checking in, we were led through the gates, down a sidewalk, around the Ring, over to breakfast.

The walkway around Apple Park.
The walkway around Apple Park.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Breakfast is served

Three of the breakfast items served at Apple Park during WWDC22. The almond butter and avocado toast was a little disappointing, actually. The bread was chewy and the avocado was unseasoned. The smoked salmon and caviar bagel also suffered from chewy bread, but tasted <em>excellent</em>. The fresh fruit was perfectly ripe. I was surprised I could not find a water fountain -- only these disposable water bottles.
Three of the breakfast items served at Apple Park during WWDC22. The almond butter and avocado toast was a little disappointing, actually. The bread was chewy and the avocado was unseasoned. The smoked salmon and caviar bagel also suffered from chewy bread, but tasted excellent. The fresh fruit was perfectly ripe. I was surprised I could not find a water fountain — only these disposable water bottles.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Getting ready for the keynote

View of the main stage from inside the Ring.
View of the main stage from inside the Ring.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View from the same spot, looking back at the audience.
View from the same spot, looking back at the audience.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Two more big video screens for the audience inside.
Two more big video screens for the audience inside.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of the main stage and video screen from the fourth row. This is minutes before the WWDC22 keynote started.
View of the main stage and video screen from the fourth row. This is minutes before the WWDC22 keynote started.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View looking back at the Ring from my spot close to the main stage.
View looking back at the Ring from my spot close to the main stage.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Two cameras flank the audience on the left and right. While none of the WWDC22 keynote was presented live, these cameras fed video back to the screens inside the building, so those sitting inside could see Tim Cook and Craig Federighi speak before the event started.
Two cameras flank the audience on the left and right. While none of the WWDC22 keynote was presented live, these cameras fed video back to the screens inside the building, so those sitting inside could see Tim Cook and Craig Federighi speak before the event started.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A drone was spotted flying around the stage before the event. Apple had signs outside the campus warning of a no-fly zone, so this drone must have been Apple's.
A drone was spotted flying around the stage before the event. Apple had signs outside the campus warning of a no-fly zone, so this drone must have been Apple’s.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Apple CEO Tim Cook and SVP of Software Engineering Craig Federighi take the stage to greet attendees before the prerecorded WWDC22 keynote plays.
Apple CEO Tim Cook and SVP of Software Engineering Craig Federighi take the stage to greet attendees before the prerecorded WWDC22 keynote plays.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The WWDC22 keynote plays on the main stage for developers and students in attendance. For being shown outside in direct sunlight, the screen was extremely bright and easy to see -- even with my sunglasses on.
The WWDC22 keynote plays on the main stage for developers and students in attendance. For being shown outside in direct sunlight, the screen was extremely bright and easy to see — even with sunglasses on.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Apple does a great job diversifying its keynotes with broader representation. However, a small oversight is that the subtitled portions of the event were hard to read from the crowd. This was not any better for attendees <a href="https://twitter.com/twostraws/status/1533877060543709184?s=20&amp;t=nT-bJ0l_BL4BHaIWdknpSA">inside the Ring</a>.
Apple does a great job diversifying its keynotes with broader representation. However, a small oversight is that the subtitled portions of the event were hard to read from the crowd. This apparently was not any better for attendees inside the Ring.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Lunch is served

After the keynote, attendees flowed back inside for lunch.

Two of the lunch dishes. A custom salad from the salad bar ended up tasting weird; the fault is entirely my own. The Thai green chicken curry was marked as spicy. I tasted no heat -- just a delicious combination of chicken, vegetables and Jasmine rice. The soda had a traditional cap, not a twist-off one, as was pointed out to me after an embarrassingly long time.
Two of the lunch dishes. A custom salad from the salad bar ended up tasting weird; the fault is entirely my own. The Thai green chicken curry was marked as spicy. I tasted no heat — just a delicious combination of chicken, vegetables and Jasmine rice. The soda had a traditional cap, not a twist-off one, as was pointed out to me after an embarrassingly long time.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A large square slice of the Romana quattro pizza, pictured here partially consumed. The crust was thin and crispy, the sauce was just a little sweet and the cheese was gooey and melted. Although I have a bias against West Coast Italian food, I must acknowledge the high quality of this American-style pizza.
A large square slice of the Romana quattro pizza, pictured here partially consumed. The crust was thin and crispy, the sauce was just a little sweet and the cheese was gooey and melted. Although I have a bias against West Coast Italian food, I must acknowledge the high quality of this American-style pizza.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

The Developer State of the Union

I stayed inside for the State of the Union presentation. I was seated at a table with several Apple engineers, from whom I got some good inside information.

Moments before the Developer State of the Union begins, as seen from inside the Ring. According to other attendees, Craig Federighi was in the front row of the audience outside, but I missed the opportunity as I was chatting with Apple engineers at my table.
Moments before the Developer State of the Union begins, as seen from inside the Ring. According to other attendees, Craig Federighi was in the front row of the audience outside, but I missed the opportunity as I was chatting with Apple engineers at my table.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
To operate the automatic coffee machine in Caffè Macs, you just tap your selection on an iPad.
To operate the automatic coffee machine in Caffè Macs, you just tap your selection on an iPad.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Tour of the building

After the State of the Union, I went on a tour of the building up the third floor. Tour guides spoke at each stop explaining highlights of how the building was constructed and designed.

The walkway on the third floor.
The walkway on the third floor.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of the event seating from the third floor.
View of the event seating from the third floor.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Balcony overlooking Caffè Macs from the third floor.
Balcony overlooking Caffè Macs from the third floor.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View overlooking the north side of the gigantic Apple Park courtyard.
View overlooking the north side of the gigantic Apple Park courtyard.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View overlooking the South side of the courtyard.
Overlooking the south side of the courtyard.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The walls in the stairwell have tiny holes to absorb sound.
The walls in the stairwell have tiny holes to absorb sound and reduce echo.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Meet the Teams

The Meet the Teams event in the Apple Park courtyard.
The Meet the Teams event in the Apple Park courtyard.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Umbrellas provide some much-needed shade from the Cupertino sun.
Umbrellas provide some much-needed shade from the Cupertino sun.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Attendees get a chance to find engineers on the Apple teams they may want to pepper with questions.
Attendees get a chance to find engineers on the Apple teams they may want to pepper with questions.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Signs like this around the campus helped attendees find engineers from specific Apple teams.
Signs like this around the campus helped attendees find engineers from specific Apple teams.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

Beauty shots around the campus

Ducks have moved into the pond in the Apple Park courtyard. They have been known to peck at the builgind's glass walls and doors. This sign warns you to take caution when opening a door so you don't accidentally smack a duckling. I did not see any ducks at the WWDC22 event.
Ducks have moved into the pond in the Apple Park courtyard. They have been known to peck at the builgind’s glass walls and doors. This sign warns you to take caution when opening a door so you don’t accidentally smack a duckling. I did not see any ducks at the WWDC22 event.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The Rainbow Stage, not included in the original Apple Park design, is now an iconic element of the courtyard. It was constructed for a Lady Gaga concert and has never been taken down.
The Rainbow Stage, not included in the original Apple Park design, is now an iconic element of the courtyard. It was constructed for a Lady Gaga concert and has never been taken down.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of the Ring from the courtyard.
View of the Ring from the courtyard.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Close-up of the glass sunshades that encircle the main Apple Park building. They reduce the direct sunlight entering the building so effectively that air conditioning only runs 20% of the year, despite the year-round California sun.
Close-up of the glass sunshades that encircle the main Apple Park building. They reduce the direct sunlight entering the building so effectively that air conditioning only runs 20% of the year, despite the year-round California sun.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Detail of the granite light fixtures that line the Apple Park walkways.
Detail of the granite light fixtures that line the Apple Park walkways.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The combined trash and recycling bins are made of wood to blend in more naturally with the Apple Park environment.
The combined trash and recycling bins are made of wood to blend in more naturally with the Apple Park environment.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
These canopies provide some much-needed shade.
These canopies provide some much-needed shade.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of the Apple Park cafeteria.
View of the Apple Park cafeteria.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Frosted glass obscures the Apple Park elevators.
Frosted glass obscures the Apple Park elevators.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
These refrigerated shelves in the walls are always kept perfectly stocked with beverages.
These refrigerated shelves in the walls are always kept perfectly stocked with beverages.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
A food bar, currently empty because lunch is well over.
A food bar, currently empty because lunch is well over.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of the seating in Caffè Macs between WWDC22 events.
View of the seating in Caffè Macs between WWDC22 events.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
View of one of Apple Park's 50-foot by 90-foot sliding glass doors. These doors open in just eight minutes and operate in total silence.
View of one of Apple Park’s 50-foot by 90-foot sliding glass doors. These doors open in just eight minutes and operate in total silence.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Looking back through the doors from outside.
Looking back through the doors from outside.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Looking down the outside seating aisle toward the stage.
Looking down the outside seating aisle toward the stage.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
These chairs are lined up in the rear of the outdoor seating.
These chairs are lined up in the rear of the outdoor seating.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Two cameras flanked both sides of the audience during the WWDC22 keynote. They channeled video feeds of the stage back to the screens inside the Ring. They were also used to live-stream the Apple Design Awards.
Two cameras flanked both sides of the audience during the WWDC22 keynote. They channeled video feeds of the stage back to the screens inside the Ring. They were also used to live-stream the Apple Design Awards.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The Apple Design Awards are about to begin.
The Apple Design Awards are about to begin.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Evangelist Linda Dong joins SVP of Design Alan Dye onstage to introduce the 2022 Apple Design Awards finalists.
Evangelist Linda Dong joins SVP of Design Alan Dye onstage to introduce the 2022 Apple Design Awards finalists.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Developers of the Apple Design Awards finalists who were in attendance were asked to stand.
Developers of the Apple Design Awards finalists who were in attendance were asked to stand.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Apple Design Awards winners received their awards, shook hands and posed for press photos.
Apple Design Awards winners received their awards, shook hands and posed for press photos.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
Linda Dong announced the Apple Design Awards winners with great enthusiasm.
Linda Dong announced the Apple Design Awards winners with great enthusiasm.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
The 2022 Apple Design Awards were the final event of the day.
The Apple Design Awards were the final event of the day.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac
WWDC22 attendees were politely, but firmly, asked to leave.
WWDC22 attendees were asked politely, yet firmly, to leave.
Photo: D. Griffin Jones/Cult of Mac

After everyone filtered out of the campus, the Apple Park Visitor Center remained open for another hour for last-minute purchases.

I joined a group of developers for dinner at Santana Row, where I ate the best Mexican food I have ever eaten. After hours of talking about the day’s events, exchanging phone numbers and emails, we wished each other luck in coming back next year and I went back to my room to pack up.