If you’re into any of these things, Apple thinks you’re a 'hipster' | Cult of Mac

If you’re into any of these things, Apple thinks you’re a ‘hipster’

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Are you a hipster? Better check the list.
Are you a hipster? Better check the list.
Photo: iiii iiii@pexels.com

You might ride around on an electric scooter in your shades and flannel shirt while sporting copious amounts of sculpted facial hair, but are you a hipster?

In certain neighborhoods of New York City or San Francisco, it may be a foregone conclusion. It’s practically mandatory. But others might wonder if they qualify.

Thankfully, a special list of “hipster words” has surfaced. And it comes from Apple, of all places.

‘List of hipster words, according to the iOS NotesShared.framework’

Miquel de Icaza (@migueldeicaza) tweeted the list on Thursday evening. He titled the tweet, “List of hipster words, according to the iOS NotesShared.framework.” In the tweet’s graphic, about 300 words are visible.

A reply followed with what appears to be a full address:

“/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/NotesShared.framework/Versions/A/Resources/Hipster.words”

A weird assortment of ‘hip’ words

As for the words themselves, it’s a fascinating list, whatever it’s actual purpose.

You’ve got some fairly obvious entries, like “twee,” “hoodie,” “occupy,” “farm-to-table,” “microdosing” and “woke.”

In terms of tech, including Apple, there are a few entries. On the retro side, there’s “mixtape,” “VHS,” “polaroid,” “Edison” and “8-bit.” You’ve also got “vaporware,” “hashtag” and, of course — and maybe this is why the list even exists — “iPhone.”

And there are several likely place names, including “marfa” (west Texas art-focused town with NYC connections), “portland,” (probably the one in Oregon), “stumptown” (Portland, OR and one of its coffee brands), “williamsburg” (in Brooklyn), “bushwick” (in Brooklyn) and, of course, “Brooklyn.”

And if you’re in a bar in one of those places, you’re probably drinking “pabst,” “schlitz” or “chartreuse.”

Then there are plenty of vaguely familiar terms that have filtered through the zeitgeist. “Mumblecore,” “locavore,” “humblebrag,” “diy,” “freegan,” “listicle,” “woke” and “fingerstache” jump out of the list.

But the list has a fair number of odd entries. Some are banal, perhaps because some context is missing: “shorts,” “pants,” “charcoal,” “probably,” “they,” “bird,” “bread,” “beer” and “Food.”

Speaking of food, of course there are numerous comestible-related entries, and you can probably guess some of them. You’ve got “kombucha,” “poke,” “raw,” “avocado,” “taiyaki,” “tumeric” [sic], “seitan,” “umami,” “gochujang,” “quinoa,” “keffiyeh,” “banh [mi]” and others.

And then there are the perplexing entries. Why, for example, does “vexillologist” appear twice? That’s someone who studies history, symbolism and, especially, the use of flags.

Flag that as “hipster,” I guess. The good news — or the bad news, depending on your perspective — is that if you’re into wearing “pants” and eating “food,” you’re a hipster, according the Apple. Go forth and be insufferable.