Steve Jobs’ teenage job application sells for much more than expected

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Steve Jobs
A job application filled out by Steve Jobs when he was even younger than this sold recently for big bucks.
Photo: BBC

The fascination with Steve Jobs continues on a decade after he passed away. A handwritten job application the Apple cofounder filled out in 1973 sold on Thursday for $221,747 (£162,000). That’s far more than it went for three years ago.

Still, there are reasons for the item to attract interest. For one, Jobs didn’t like signing autographs so they are rare. And this is just an interesting document all on its own.

Jobs filled out the application when he was 18 years old. It shows that the man most responsible for the iPhone didn’t have a phone at that tome. And when asked about access to transportation, the future billionaire says, “possible, but not probable.”

The auction listing notes that:

“In the questionnaire Steve Jobs highlights his experience with ‘computers and calculators’ and special abilities in ‘electronic tech or design engineer – digital’. The questionnaire is believed to have been completed around the time he dropped out of Reed College in Portland, Oregon. A year later he joined Atari as a technician where he worked with Steve Wozniak before they founded Apple in 1976.”

Questionnaire
Not typed on a Mac for obvious reasons.
Photo: Charterfields

A unique piece of Apple memorabilia

Documents such as this don’t come up for auction all that regularly. In this case, however, the item previously went under the gavel relatively recently. In February 2018, three years ago, it was also auctioned, ultimately selling for more than $175,000. That was a far cry from the $50,000 it was expected to sell for that time.

But perhaps it’s not surprising that a Steve Jobs’ job application sold for over $221,000. The first tweet ever sent recently sold at auction for $2.9 million (£2.1m). And that was as a nonfungible token (NFT) — at least the buyer of the Jobs document got something they could actually hold in their hand.

Luke Dormehl contributed to this article.

Source: BidSpotter.com