iCloud.com finally goes mobile-friendly for iOS and Android phones

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iCloud-mobile-iOS
It's now usable in mobile Safari.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

iCloud.com is finally mobile-friendly, more than eight years after its introduction. The site now works on Android and iOS devices, allowing you to access Photos, Notes, Reminders, and more.

Apple has always directed users to its native apps, or a desktop browser, when visiting iCloud.com on an iPhone. This forced us to load the site in desktop mode, which isn’t ideal on a smaller screen.

But it seems Apple has finally acknowledged that there might be times when you need to log into your iCloud account on another phone. So iCloud.com finally plays nicely with mobile devices.

iCloud.com goes mobile

Visiting iCloud.com on an Android or iOS devices lets you access Photos, Notes, and Reminders. You can also use Find iPhone (but not the complete Find My app).

Everything is optimized for mobile, so it’s actually usable on a smaller display. And although some functionality has been stripped away, support for mobile devices is surprisingly good.

In Photos, for instance, you can upload images directly from your phone. In Notes, you can view and edit just like you normally would inside the native Notes app on your iPhone.

If you visit iCloud.com on a tablet, you will also get access to Mail, Contacts, Calendar, and more. Visiting on an iPad, which is treated like a desktop in iPadOS, loads the same site you’ll see on a Mac.

Why is this useful?

You might be wondering why mobile support for iCloud.com is important when apps like Photos and Notes are already installed on your iPhone. Well, there are a number of reasons.

If you lose your iPhone, the ability to log into iCloud on someone else’s phone is incredibly useful. Especially now that you can use Find iPhone to track down your missing handset.

If you also have an Android handset that you use occassionally, you can access all your photos and videos without having to transfer them all over from your iPhone.

When you think about use cases like this, it’s surprising it has taken eight years for iCloud.com to be usable on mobile devices. But now that it’s finally here, we’re not complaining.

Via: News Landed