Curved glass iPhone 8 is one of 10+ prototypes Apple is testing

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The shape of iPhones to come?
Photo: Samsung

Rumors continue to stack up claiming that next year’s iPhone will ship with a curved display, but The Wall Street Journal suggests that such a smartphone is just “one of more than 10 prototypes being considered.”

In a new report, the WSJ adds credibility to the rumor that Apple will adopt OLED displays for at least some models of the 2017 iPhone.

According to the newspaper, Apple will reply on Samsung for its OLED displays (Apple’s long-time frenemy spent $10 billion this year expanding its OLED production capabilities). Apple reportedly wants to later augment Samsung’s OLED production with displays made by LG Display, Japan Display and the Foxconn-owned Sharp Corp.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard that the iPhone 8 may take a page out of Samsung’s Galaxy S7 edge playbook and opt for a rounded, OLED display. Unlike the Note 7, the S7 edge has been well-received. Despite accusations that it’s a bit of a gimmick, the unique design has helped the phone become a commercial success.

Apple has long been working on designs for smartphones with flexible, wraparound screens, and this upgrade would certainly be welcome among users who want Apple to move on from the iPhone 6 form factor introduced in 2013.

In addition to OLED displays, there have also been rumors that Apple’s next iPhone will boast an all-glass housing, which could help bring wireless charging to the iPhone.

These remain rumors for now. Apple is certainly months away from going into mass production with the next iPhone, which means things have time to change. However, with more and more reports appearing to “confirm” similar information about the iPhone 8, there might be something to these rumors.

What are you hoping for from next year’s iPhone upgrade? Leave your comments below.

Source: The Wall Street Journal