You won’t find these Apple Music albums on Spotify

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Yes, we know. That one.

Taylor Swift fans aren’t the only ones with reasons to celebrate Apple Music.

Apple’s new streaming service boasts over 30 million songs. That’s according to the company, anyway; we definitely haven’t counted them. And even though it’s only a day old, it’s looking like it could have a chance to cut into the business of rival streamers like Spotify. And part of how it’s doing that is by landing content for its library that the other people don’t have.

Here are five albums Apple Music can brag about. Other than 1989, we mean. Because everyone knows 1989 is on there.

‘The Chronic’ by Dr. Dre

It stands to reason that Apple Music was going to get some Dre in there, considering the service was built on top of the company he founded. But having The Chronic available for streaming is still a huge deal. It’s one of the most important rap albums of the ’90s, which also makes it one of the most important rap albums ever released, and its absence on Spotify has always been glaring.

‘So’ by Peter Gabriel

Maybe this isn’t as exciting as The Chronic or 1989, but streaming users who have wanted to stream “Sledgehammer” have been out of luck so far.

The former Genesis member’s fifth solo effort also contains the number-two stalker anthem of the ’80s thanks to its inclusion in that ridiculous boombox scene in director Cameron Crowe’s Say Anything. The first, of course, was The Police’s “Every Step You Take,” but that’s neither here nor there.

The point is that if you wanna be someone’s sledgehammer, they can totally call your name now.

‘Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes’ and ‘The Eraser’ by Thom Yorke

The Radiohead frontman has been reticent about releasing the band’s albums to streaming services, let alone his solo work. But Apple Music listeners can now get a double dose of haunting and eerie electronic music with these two newly stream-ready albums.

And if you need more than just Thom Yorke, we have more good news for you.

‘In Rainbows’ by Radiohead

The ensemble’s seventh studio album came out in 2007 with a then-slightly crazy (but insanely successful) “pay what you want” release. More importantly, however, it’s one of their best works and is one of the few modern albums you can listen to that uses the proto-electronic instrument the Ondes Martenot. And that’s just something you have to hear.