Batman and Superman disagree on everything


Seriously, didn't you see this trailer? Photo: How It Should Have Ended
Seriously, didn't you see this trailer? Photo: How It Should Have Ended

Here’s what would happen if Superman and Batman got together for coffee to talk about the big trailer reveal of the past week.

No, it’s not Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

Instead, Supes is excited about Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and calls it the best trailer out there. Batman tries to get the Man of Steel to consider their own dual trailer to no avail.

Superhero banter, sarcasm, and some pretty funny lines ahead. You’ve been warned.

See Batman’s armored batsuit in first Batman v Superman trailer


The Dark Knight gets headlights in the first trailer for Batman v. Superman. Photo: Warner Bros. Pictures
The Dark Knight gets headlights in the first trailer for Batman v. Superman. Photo: Warner Bros. Pictures

If Batman’s going to take on Superman, he’s going to need some extra protection and firepower. The first trailer for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice gives us our a glimpse of the armored batsuit — complete with glowing white eyes — the Dark Knight will don in the superhero smackdown flick.

I think we can safely assume Jony Ive isn’t designing products for Bruce Wayne. The armored batsuit looks anything but thin and light.

5 TV superhero origins we loved watching and 5 more we’d love to see unfold



In the beginning...

Whether it’s reboots or prequels, over the past few years there’s been a renewed interest in superhero origin tales. No matter if it's Captain America being transformed from 90lb weakling Steve Rogers into an All-American super soldier, or Bruce Wayne travelling the globe honing the necessary skills to become Batman, these are often the most rewarding comic book stories out there — and the bevy of new superhero-themed TV shows is the perfect canvas on which to tell them.

Read on for our thoughts on the five shows which did the best job of telling us how our favorite heroes came to be — and the five origin stories we’re convinced would make for winning TV if they were given a shot.

Photo: Warner Bros. Television

5 that we like... Gotham

Okay, so we’re still at the beginning of this show, but all the pieces are in place for something great — even if they haven’t quite clicked yet. The Commissioner Gordon story was serviced well in Chris Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy, but he’s an engaging character to follow, and aging him in his thirties rather than mid-forties, as Gary Oldman was in Batman Begins, changes the dynamic somewhat.

The comics have never really explored what Bruce Wayne did between his parents’ death and leaving Gotham City to begin his Batman training, so there’s plenty of ground to explore there also. Color me “cautiously optimistic” about Gotham.

If only someone would tell Jada Pinkett Smith she’s not auditioning for the 1966 Batman TV series.

Photo: Warner Bros. Television


Up until Gotham, Arrow seemed like it would be the Young Bruce Wayne show we’d never get to watch. Telling the story of an angry, young billionaire who returns home after a sizeable absence and wreaks revenge on the wealthy elite who have profited off everyone else’s misery, it was an origin we could get on board for.

Arrow was a good supporting character in Smallville, and he's proved a great leading one as well -- with a compelling origin, to boot.

Photo: Warner Bros. Television

Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman

For years in the pages of DC, the status quo for Lois Lane and Clark Kent were the two coworkers who, even before their comic book wedding, essentially behaved like an old married couple: bickering with one another, finishing each other’s sentences, and generally acting like characters who had been stuck treading water for the past 50 years. Which is exactly what they were.

Lois and Clark shook up the dynamic by taking both characters back to basics and developing their relationship from the first meeting. Sure, not every aspect of the show has held up (the special effects look a bit ropey) but as a character study showing how both became the people we know them as today, it was perfect.

Photo: Warner Bros. Television


After Lois and Clark had finished, Smallville had a tough ask on its hands, being asked to retell the Superman origin yet again on primetime TV. Worse, the edict was that Clark wouldn’t be allowed in the Superman suit, which left us with a goodie two-shoes character growing up in a small American town given a name to imply that nothing of significance ever happens there.

The result? Ten years of consistently entertaining television, which managed to uncover new depths in an origin tale most of us felt we’d seen already by 1980. Storylines faltered a bit toward the end, but Smallville more than earns its place on this list. Oh, and Tom Welling was a better Clark Kent than either Superman Returns’ Brandon Routh or Man of Steel’s Henry Cavill.

Photo: Warner Bros. Television


Like a day that starts off with the sun shining and a free ice cream, and ends with the death of everyone you care about, Heroes’ reputation suffers from the fact that its last three seasons were so darn poor. But that doesn’t take away from the fact that the first season, a.k.a. the origin story, was excellent.

Telling the story of a group of ordinary people who gradually discover they have superpowers, the show took the time to explore the personal impact of these abilities at the kind of leisurely pace that’s simply not possible in a movie. Watch it if you want to see this kind of story done well. Turn off after season one if you don’t want to see a great idea collapse into mediocrity.

Photo: Tailwind Productions

And 5 that we'd like to see... Spider-Man

Okay, so we’re unlikely to get a Spider-Man TV series, given that we’re currently in the middle of Marc Webb’s blockbuster reboot. But unlike almost any other comic book character, Spider-Man would work far better on TV than on the big screen. The comics were always soap opera heavy, and with more space to play with story lines it would be possible to explore the extended universe of characters.

A lot of people hated Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3 because it crammed too much into one movie. If that had been a whole season of a TV show, though? Totally different story. Who wouldn’t want to watch this?

Photo: Columbia Picture


Buffy the Vampire Slayer

The first season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer loosely followed on from Joss Whedon’s 1992 Buffy movie, with the titular vampire slayer arriving in Sunnydale after being booted out of her old school. More than a decade after the acclaimed TV series ended (and more than 20 after the now-forgotten movie), however, it would be good fun to go back and tell the story of exactly how L.A. cheerleader Buffy Summers discovers she’s the Chosen One.

A new Buffy, plus no Xander, Willow, Giles or Spike could make it a tough sell for old-school Buffy fans, but Whedon would agree to be show runner it could be a fun (sort of prequel) to the series we know and love.

Photo: 20th Century Fox Television

Ghost Rider

Post-Sons of Anarchy, the story Ghost Rider would make a fantastic show. In case you don’t know, Ghost Rider is stunt motorcyclist Johnny Blaze, who surrenders his soul to the devilish Mephisto in order to save the life of his father. After this, Blaze’s flesh is consumed by hellfire when evil is around, resulting in his head turning into a flaming skull, while he rides around on a fiery motorcycle.

Now that the two awful Nicolas Cage movies are behind us, Ghost Rider would certainly have legs as a TV series. Use the great Ultimate Marvel origin story as your blueprint if you want.

Image: Marvel Comics


Neither Marvel or DC have proven too willing to engage with the idea of giving superheroines their own movies, so TV could be a great way of demonstrating that there is an audience who will happily turn out to watch a female hero. I’ve always liked Supergirl as a character, and her current New 52 incarnation is intriguing.

In short, she’s got the same powers as Superman, but the unpredictability of a teenager, and nothing in the way of Clark’s affection for Earth. The result is a twist on a familiar story, and a concept that blurs the wish fulfilment of Superman with the realities of being a teenager trying to establish their own place in the world.

Image: DC Comics

The Darkness

A bit of an odd final choice here, but I’ve been revisiting some of my favorite Image books from the late 90s, and Top Cow’s The Darkness stands up so much better than most. Originally written by Garth Ennis, the series tells the story of a mafia hitman who inherits supernatural powers on his twenty-first birthday. The result is a mix between Batman, H.P. Lovecraft and The Sopranos.

Now tell me that wouldn’t make a great show?

Photo: Top Cow Comics

8 epic movie crossovers we’d love to see



Nothing beats a mash-up!

When we’re not bending our latest smartphones simply to see what will happen, there’s nothing that appeals to the dark recesses of the human (possibly male) mind more than watching two characters we recognize from separate franchises cross over to one another’s universes. It doesn’t matter if it’s The Simpsons and Family Guy, the NBA and the Loony Tunes, or Batman and Superman, all that matters is that it happens. And preferably that they end up fighting one another.

With casting well underway for a 2015 big screen adaptation of the endearingly daft Pride & Prejudice & Zombies, we figured it was the perfect opportunity to run down the movie mash-ups we most want to see. Scroll through our gallery to get your crossover on.

Picture: Pride & Prejudice & Zombies

G.I. Joe vs. Transformers

G.I. Joe meeting the Transformers was one of the comics that blew my mind as a kid, and I’d welcome the same experience as an adult. Unlike a lot of crossovers this one should be fairly straightforward, with the rights held by Hasbro and Paramount. Despite a rocky start, the G.I. Joe movies greatly improved with 2013’s G.I. Joe: Retaliation, while the Transformers flicks could certainly use a Joe-sized shot in the arm. I’d definitely be on board.

Picture: Marvel Comics

King Kong vs. Godzilla Round 2

Sure, this one’s cheating. The Godzilla/King Kong battle has already been carried out in 1962’s superbly campy King Kong vs. Godzilla. But on the back of this year’s enjoyable Godzilla reboot, it would be fantastic to bring the battle up to date with cutting edge special effects. Done right, it would certainly put the dino fight from 2005’s King Kong to shame — even if sorting out the proper sizes of the two combatants would require a return to the drawing board.

Photo: Toho Studios

The Vega Brothers

Quentin Tarantino’s movies all take place in the same fictitious universe. Ever since QT introduced us to brothers Victor and Vincent Vega in Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction respectively, fans have been begging for a team-up. Given the length of time that has elapsed since then, creating a prequel would be kind of difficult. Of course, neither character makes it alive out of their respective movie either, which makes a sequel kind of difficult. But Tarantino has rewritten history more than that before.

The man killed Hitler, for goodness sake!

Photo: Miramax

Power Rangers vs. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

The Power Rangers did, in fact, team up with the Turtles during an episode of Power Rangers in Space, but that only whetted our appetites for more. We just got done with the Michael Bay TMNT reboot and with a Power Rangers movie in the works too this would make for a great blockbuster mash-up. Fill it with the kind of self-referential fan service we saw in 2009’s tremendous Turtles Forever and you’ve got an undisputed winner.

Photo: Bandai

Aliens vs. Star Trek

Okay, so this is a slightly strange one but as a long-time fan of both franchises, I’ve always been intrigued by this possibility. My optimal period for this to have taken place would have been the 1990s, when the aliens could have taken on the Next Generation Crew, but I’ll accept my Aliens/Star Trek crossover however it comes. Seeing the crew try to contain the alien by trapping it on the Holodeck would be superb entertainment.

Picture: Andy Price

Freddy vs. Pinhead

Actor Robert Englund is 67 now, although appearing in more films than ever. Perfect, then, for him to make one last appearance as Freddy Krueger, to rinse away the taste of the awful 2010 remake starring Jackie Earle Haley. I was a massive fan of 2003’s Freddy vs. Jason, which pitted everyone’s favorite Springwood Slasher against Friday the 13th's unstoppable killing machine.

With '80s nostalgia still working at the box office, why not dust Freddy off to face one more iconic cinematic murderer in the form of Hellraiser’s Pinhead? The Cenobite realm/Freddy’s world sequences would be worth the price of admission alone.

Photo: Moviepilot


Terminator vs. Predator

There was an Aliens versus Predator versus The Terminator comic series from Dark Horse Comics back in 2000. Spinning off from Alien Resurrection (not the most promising of signs), it turned out to be a waste of all three franchises, although the concept wins some points for at least trying such a crazy idea in the first place. The Terminator movies have been disappointing since 1991’s fantastic T2: Judgment Day, while only the original Predator movie holds classic status.

Could a mash-up of the two properties redeem them? There’s only one way to find out.

Picture: Dark Horse Comics

JLA meet the Avengers

In the works since 1979, a JLA/Avengers crossover finally happened in 2003, bringing together the World’s Mightiest Heroes and DC’s Justice League of America. With the two franchises set to collide (sort of) when Avengers: Age of Ultron and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice finally make it to theaters, the idea of mashing up both series seems unthinkable at present.

Looking longer-term, though, who wouldn’t want to Batman face off against Iron Man, or Superman with Captain America? The only losers would be the poor legal teams who had to work out the agreement for it to happen.

Picture: DC Comics/Marvel Comics

Rare Superman comic fetches record $3.2 million


Courtesy DC Comics Wiki
Courtesy DC Comics Wiki

Earlier this week, a copy of the holy grail of comic book collecting, Action Comics No. 1 from 1938, sold on eBay for a record shattering sum of $3.2 million.

This pristine copy of Superman’s first appearance in comic books sold for a whopping $1,046,852 more than the previous record-holder, a less pristine copy of Action Comics‘ first issue, which sold for $2.1 million back in 2011. There are only an estimated 50 copies of the hotly collectible title left in the world.