Majority of iPhone users would consider buying Apple Car


Watch out Tesla, here comes the iCar.
Photo: Cult of Mac

The idea that Apple is working on a car is something the company still hasn’t admitted to, other than describing the product category as the “ultimate mobile device,” but that’s not going to stop industry watchers from speculating about it.

A Nielsen and SBD survey recently asked 14,000 iPhone-owning car buyers whether they would buy an Apple-branded automobile. And if the results are to be believed, Apple may be in a good position to get into the car biz.

Would you buy an Apple Car?
Would you buy an Apple Car?
Photo: BI Intelligence

Interestingly, Business Insider describes the findings as a black mark against Apple. That’s because 47 percent of respondees said they would consider themselves “not likely at all” to buy an Apple Car. That leaves 53 percent who would be open to it, however, and these 33 percent considered themselves anywhere between “likely” and “extremely likely,” while the remaining 20 percent were “somewhat likely.”

If Apple could capture anywhere close to this percentage of iPhone owners it would immediately smash the targets set by analysts like Piper Jaffray’s Gene Munster, who claims even a “moderate success” would rake in an extra $50 billion per year for Apple — or an increase of 23 percent on top of the already impressive cash-generating machine that was Apple in 2015.

Considering that the majority of iPhone owners don’t (for good reason) associate Apple with automobiles, I’d say that having 53 percent of your target audience open to buying an as-yet-unannounced product with no specs, based on no track record for this kind of business, is pretty darn great. Wouldn’t you?

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  • שלו

    self driving car from apple? sign me in from now

  • AAPL.To.Break.$130.Soon>:-)

    The cost would be crazy high. I’d prefer a car of my own choosing with Apple electronic tech installed. That’s more than acceptable for me.

    • Ted

      High cost? Based on what? Relative to what? What?!

  • not really fair since the choices are literally yes, yes, yes, yes, no. 80% of the choices are yes. how about you add 4 more “no” choices and make this a fair distribution.