Take a peek inside Jony Ive’s $17 million ‘Billionaire’s Row’ mansion

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Want to improve your Monday by seeing how design guru Jony Ive lives? Over the weekend, Business Insider ran a gallery, showcasing Apple’s acclaimed design guru’s home on San Francisco’s “Gold Coast,” also known as “Billionaire’s Row.”

While Apple rarely discounts products, the same didn’t apply here, since Ive picked up the mansion for a (relative) snip in 2012: paying $17 million against an original asking price of $25 million.

The five-floor home was completed in 1927, and features a modest four bedrooms and 7.5 bathrooms (I wonder if the half bathroom was an incremental S release with only minor under-the-hood improvements!). It was designed by well-known local architect Willis Polk.

Of course, there’s no way of knowing how the property has been modified since Ive and his wife moved in. For all we know, he’s given the whole thing a flattened, iOS 7 makeover, and replaced every inch of wood and stone with aluminium and sapphire crystal glass.

Still, a man needs somewhere to store his impressive (growing) army of cars, doesn’t he?

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the-dining-room-provides-a-great-view-of-the-water

the-formal-sitting-room-has-a-lovely-pattern-on-the-ceiling

cozy-up-in-the-library

  • http://www.teomaragakis.com Teo Maragakis

    It seems a bit… skeuomorphic!

    • D R

      yeah, you kind of want that IRL. otherwise, you wind up burning your hand touching the bookshelf because you forgot it really is the stove.

      • http://www.teomaragakis.com Teo Maragakis

        Seriously though, I would have expected him out of all people to have a more minimalist and modern interior design style in his home.

        Doesn’t he truly believe in the principles he uses in his work?

      • Jim

        That’s seems like a bit of a moronic statement. Designers take inspiration from all kinds of places. We wouldn’t have minimalist design today if we hadn’t went through classical/romanesque/gothic/modernist/post-modernist periods in the first place. They all built up to the point design is at now and it would be silly to think that just because Jony favors simplicity in product design that he can’t enjoy ornamentation in architecture.

      • http://www.teomaragakis.com Teo Maragakis

        “That’s seems like a bit of a moronic statement.”

        That’s seems like a bit of irony.

      • Christopher Riess

        You misinterpret the meaning of irony.

  • Åsa Stenström

    This was not at all what I expected???

    • Matthew Chambers

      That’s what it looked like when he bought it, not at present. This just gives you a feel for the layout. As the article states, he very well could’ve overhauled & redesigned the interior – which I imagine he would’ve w/ furniture from the likes of Eames & Herman Miller.

      • CelestialTerrestrial

        I have an old original Eames chair. I can tell you from first hand experience, they look great from a timeless furniture design perspective, but in terms of comfort level and ergonomics, they suck. They score high for modern furniture design but rate low in terms of ergonomics. They are horrible for your back. No back support at all.

      • http://www.rwanderman.wordpress.com Richard

        Agreed. I have one too, it looks great, not for sitting in for any length of time.

      • RyanTV

        Yah, I’m betting that isn’t the furniture/decor that Jony has in there now.

  • Martin Fielder

    Yuck. Not very “apple-ish”

  • WardC

    Very classic looking English tudor-style house. I do like the outside look of the house. I live in a tudor-style house as well, ours was built in 1928. Very classic look!

  • CelestialTerrestrial

    Nice, but not my cup of tea. I’m surprised he doesn’t have or they aren’t showing a music listening room with a bitching stereo system. Nor is there a single computer shown.

  • CelestialTerrestrial

    Does Jony have a kick ass 3D printer in his home to do prototype designs when he gets the urge? he can definitely afford it.

  • Alex1776

    Incredible views out the windows, who cares what the interior looks like (that can always be fixed with enough money).

  • rogifan

    First of all this is very old news as Ive bought the house in 2012. Second, according to Vanity Fair the house is being remodeled by Norman Foster’s team (doing a building permit search shows Ive is spending close to $2M remodeling). Do a Google street view of this address and it’s quite obvious no one is living in it at the moment because of the construction.

  • Botvinnik

    nice digs.

  • Spyinthesky

    About as opposite as it gets, I guess its a little bit of home if 19th Century home.

  • bdkennedy11

    I never understood why one person would need that much space. Most people that own mansions don’t utilize 75% of it.

    • chas_m

      To be fair, the house has four bedrooms. Ive is not single; he has a wife and kids. It’s hardly a “mansion” by normal US standards (particularly these days), and its price is dictated by its location and views, not square footage. It’s a luxurious home, no doubt, but let’s not confuse it with Biltmore House or anything.

      As for the newsworthiness, I have to point out that many other sites covered this story (and used these pictures, which are all pre-Ive ownership) when he bought the house — two years ago. Way to scoop, Business Insider!

  • http://www.sk1wbw.wordpress.com/ Wayne Williams

    About the size of my master bedroom.

  • WALDO PEPPER

    Aren’t these interior shots of the home as it was listed and being shown before Ive bought it? If so, he would have it remodeled and we wouldn’t have any photos of the new interior unless Architectural Digest or a similar outlet did a spread on it, right?
    These look like zillow shots to me~

About the author

Luke DormehlLuke Dormehl is a UK-based journalist and author, with a background working in documentary film for Channel 4 and the BBC. He is the author of The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems, And Create More and The Apple Revolution, both published by Penguin/Random House. His tech writing has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, Techmeme, and other publications. He'd like you a lot if you followed him on Twitter.

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