Oscars Host Ellen DeGeneres Ditched Her Galaxy Note For An iPhone Backstage

ellendegeneres

Samsung may have flashed a bit of cash to get Oscars host Ellen DeGeneres to appear on-stage with a Galaxy Note, but it seems that DeGeneres ditched the device backstage, as she was spotted tweeting out selfies using an iPhone.

Several of DeGeneres’ other tweets featured the “via Twitter for iPhone” watermark.

DeGeneres’ decision to return to the iPhone after the show may have had something to do with the quality of her Galaxy Note images, which saw her add the hashtag “#blurry” to one Twitter update:

In conclusion, while Samsung may have succeeded in turning the Oscars into one long infomercial, it definitely failed at looking like a brand that people will use voluntarily.

Maybe they’ll have to be even more de-generous next year when it comes to writing out checks.

  • http://twitter.com/gettysburg11s gettysburg11s

    That’s awesome. Go iPhone!! (and Ellen, for being an iPhone user).

  • Al

    Honestly, this is a pretty silly article. It’s obvious that Ellen’s personal phone is an iPhone. If you could take selfies with a zillion famous people wouldn’t you use your personal phone? And believe it or not, it is possible to take a blurry picture with the almighty iPhone! Geez…

  • digitaldumdum

    “Oscars Host Ellen DeGeneres Ditched Her Galaxy Note For An iPhone Backstage”

    The obnoxious Samsung “phablet” DeGeneres was using was so big, what turned out to be the selfie that crashed Twitter might have actually been a good photo if the stars had actually looked into the camera lens. Instead, they were so taken with looking at themselves, there’s no eye contact with the rest of us. Given that selfies are by nature nothing but flashes of vanity, that one takes the top Oscar.

    • JohnDoey

      Everybody looks at the screen. How would they even know where the camera lens is if they aren’t familiar with that particular phone? The device maker is supposed to position the camera lens such that you can look at the screen and still get a decent shot.

      This is as old as photography. Many portraits feature a subject who is obviously looking at the photographer, not the lens. A good photographer works around this by placing the lens appropriately. In a selfie, that is not possible.

      These are movie stars at the Oscars. The idea that they should be wilting flowers when a camera comes out is absurd.

  • Megamancito

    I’m both an iPhone user and an Android user and I see a lot of bias in this post. Come one guys, don’t skew the news. She said blurry cause it was blurry lol she’s obviously moving and not even an iPhone would be perform that great under poor lighting conditions and motion. I also don’t think it’s unusual for a person to have a business and a personal phone.

    • Mark Mann

      What do you expect from “cult of mac”?

      • Megamancito

        touché

      • Antony

        so basically don’t expect any unbiased journalism from “cult of mac”.
        got it

        while I can’t speak for Samsung, I do enjoy images better on my Nexus 5 than on my iPhone 5 (not 5s.. I don’t own 5s/5c)

      • Megamancito

        Exactly! Lol

    • JohnDoey

      It is absolutely undisputed that an iPhone is a much, much better camera than any Samsung phone. You are showing bias by trying to pretend they are equivalent.

  • Ben Reid

    “de-generous?” Luke, I love you!

  • Charles

    Well, the deal is, it seems that a majority of people are using iPhone…if Ellen had liked the Note 3 well enough, I am sure Samsung would’ve been glad for her to keep it and use it…as the article states, she chose otherwise. Speaks for itself really.

  • JohnDoey

    That is just her personal iPhone. The Samsung phone was just a stage prop. There is no reason to expect her to use a stage prop as her personal phone or vice versa.

About the author

Luke DormehlLuke Dormehl is a UK-based journalist and author, with a background working in documentary film for Channel 4 and the BBC. He is the author of The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems, And Create More and The Apple Revolution, both published by Penguin/Random House. His tech writing has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, Techmeme, and other publications. He'd like you a lot if you followed him on Twitter.

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