Dropbox is finally testing a native app for Apple M1 chips

By

Dropbox tests native Apple M1 app
You should be able to try it out yourself this month.
Image: Dropbox/Cult of Mac

Dropbox has finally begun testing a brand-new Mac app that runs natively on Apple silicon chipsets. It comes after the company originally said it had no plans to support M1 chips, which was met with backlash from irritated users.

The new app is available to only a small number of people for now, but Dropbox reportedly plans to offer a beta to all Mac users by the end of this month.

Dropbox will support Apple silicon chips

Those who rely on Dropbox to store their data in the cloud typically pay a monthly subscription fee for additional storage. So, they were understandably upset when the company initially shunned new Macs with custom Apple chips.

It seems, however, that there may have been some miscommunication between the company’s developers and those who told forum users that Apple silicon support was not part of Dropbox’s plans. A new app is coming … slowly.

A year after the first Apple M1 chip made its debut, Dropbox has confirmed to MacRumors that a new Mac app that runs natively on Apple silicon is finally in testing. And you should be able to try it out for yourself soon.

“Dropbox has … begun testing native Apple silicon support with a small batch of its Mac user base and that it plans to offer all users who run the beta of its Mac app native Apple silicon support by the end of January,” reads the report.

What to expect from Dropbox for Apple silicon

Although that’s all the information we have for now, it’s reasonable to expect a native Dropbox app to be significantly snappier on M1 chips than that which was originally built for Intel processors — and now requires translation on new Macs.

The app should also be more efficient, which means a less significant impact on battery life if you’re running it on a MacBook.