Apple prepares maximum payouts for authorized repairers amid COVID-19 pandemic, report claims

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fixing of taptic engine on iPhone
Apple wants to help keep repair shops open.
Photo: iFixit

Apple is prepared to pay authorized repairers maximum payouts for qualifying products amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, according to a leaked internal memo distributed to Authorized Service Providers.

Cupertino has closed all of its own stores outside of Greater China, leaving third parties to tackle repair needs. It reportedly wants to ensure that those partners are supported financially while the outbreak spreads worldwide.

Some Apple Stores in the United States are using a handful of staff to handle pre-existing orders and scheduled repair pickups. Elsewhere, however, Apple’s retail locations are completely closed to visitors.

If you have an Apple device in urgent need of repair, then, you’ll need to turn to a third-party repairer. Those authorized by Apple are reportedly being offered support to ensure they remain open for business.

Apple hopes to support authorized repairers

An internal memo distributed among authorized repairers, and obtained by MacRumors, reveals Apple is offering maximum payouts for qualifying repairs throughout March and April — regardless of performance metrics.

“Apple is making this move to ensure that its authorized technicians are financially supported amid the challenging COVID-19 pandemic,” the report adds. “Apple also told its technicians that it supports their decisions and encourages them to be thoughtful regarding the safety of its employees and the operations of their businesses.”

Despite suffering the coronavirus impact itself, Apple has stepped up to support customers, staff, and partners during the pandemic. It has already committed $15 million in donations to help fight the global spread.

Apple has also agreed to match employee donations two-to-one, and will pay staff who are unable to work as a result of the disease. Apple has also committed $1 million to support businesses in San Jose that will lose revenue as a result of the Worldwide Developers Conference going online-only this year.