Apple AR tech will bring Alabama civil rights history to life

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Apple CEO Tim Cook at the launch of Ed Farm in Birmingham.
Apple CEO Tim Cook attended the debut of Ed Farm, an educational initiative in Alabama.
Photo: Tim Cook/Apple

In Birmingham today, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced Ed Farm, which will help teach students to program with Apple’s “Everyone Can Code” curriculum.

In addition, Cook  reportedly spoke about employing his company’s augmented reality tools in Birmingham’s civil rights historical sites.

Apple plants an Ed Farm in Alabama

Details on this newly-announced education initiative are still sketchy, but Apple’s CEO took to Twitter to say “Honored to join Birmingham’s students, teachers and visionary leaders in opening Ed Farm — a new education hub where students can connect, learn and create!”

Ed Farm says it “equips educators in schools and communities with innovative tools and strategies that support active learning for all students.” That specifically includes Apple’s Everyone Can Code and Everyone Can Create curricula.

Apple often emphasizes the importance of learning to write software. And the company created “Everyone Can Code” to teach children and adults the fundamentals.

Bringing AR to Birmingham’s civil rights history

An attendee of Cook’s speach revealed that he promised to use augmented reality “to bring Civil Rights history to life.”

Birmingham played an important role in the drive for civil rights. Among the more famous sites is the 16th Street Baptist Church, a meeting place for black activists that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan in 1963, killing four young black girls.

Alabama is Tim Cook’s home state — he was born in Mobile. Apple’s CEO will be interviewed tomorrow by Fox Business, and the Birmingham Ed Farm educational initiative is on the agenda.