Facebook security chief begs Adobe to kill Flash

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html5-book
The battle continues to put Flash to death in favor of HTML5.
Photo: Jeremy Keith/Flickr CC

Though Adobe Flash has been dying a slow death over the past few years, it’s far from dead yet. However, it seems like some people are getting pretty impatient with it and Facebook’s new chief security officer Alex Stamos is one of those people. He publicly tweeted yesterday calling out Adobe to just set a date already to kill Flash and make an announcement to put an end to its misery.

Not only is Flash just a dying and increasingly unnecessary technology, it comes with a host of security issues and vulnerabilities, which is perhaps why Stamos is calling on Adobe to put it to rest. Adobe released yet another patch just a few weeks ago for a security hole that caught the attention of hackers and attackers.

Apple has led the way being aggressive with its stance on Flash. In 2010 Steve Jobs declared once and for all that Adobe Flash would never make it into iOS products because Apple instead wanted to focus its efforts on adopting the HTML5 open web standard instead. As a result, no one with an iPhone or iPad can run Flash. Additionally, Apple also no longer pre-installs Flash on any Macs, though it’s still available there for download.

Though it continually declines, many websites, particularly older ones, still rely on Flash for either specific blocks of content like video or entire web pages. Plus, all of the major web browsers like Chrome and Safari still fully support the plug-in. Even if it’s only necessary for two websites out of the hundreds people visit, most consumers see no reason to not install it and that ultimately slows progress moving away from proprietary browser plug-ins.

It’s important that desktop web browsers now begin to follow where mobile began by eliminating support for Adobe Flash and giving Adobe all the more reason to kill it off in favor of HTML5.