Inside The Vintage Mac Museum

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Think you got enough Apple stuff? Cult of Mac’s resident vintage expert Adam Rosen has collected so many Apple products over the last three decades, he converted part of his house into a museum to showcase them all. (Read on to see what he thinks you should keep or toss, too.)

Assembling your own collection of Mac gear isn’t easy, but the Vintage Mac Museum has managed to get its hands on some really neat – and odd – items, like a cutaway Mac Plus, a rare black Mac and more Apple memorabilia than any sane person should own.

Here’s a look at incredible assortment of Apple products at the Vintage Mac Museum:

PowerBooks and Picasso
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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

The rare items wall, including a clear-sided Mac Plus, old PowerBooks, and a Macintosh Picasso dealer sign. Mona Switcher Ellen Feiss gazes down from above.

Mac Plus Cutaway

Here’s a Mac Plus where the back and one side have been replaced with plexiglass to show off a hard drive upgrade. This is like a working “cutaway drawing” of the Macintosh.

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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.
Apple TV (Black Mac)
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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

A rare black Mac, combining a color Mac with a TV tuner and video input. This is a good example of a market dud that makes a desirable collectable. A LaserWriter IINT lurks below.

Macintosh Portable (Luggable)
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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

The first portable Macintosh was known as the “Mac Luggable,” weighing in at 15 pounds with included lead-acid battery. And you thought your laptop was heavy!

Apple Lisa
Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

The Lisa predated the Macintosh and introduced the world to the GUI. The Newton predated the iPhone and introduced the world to the PDA. And beige and green go well together, colorwise…

iMac Corner
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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

 The iMac corner. Three iMac DV models run early versions of Mac OS X – Cheetah 10.0, Puma 10.1, and Jaguar 10.2. An Airport Extreme base station hovers above.

Mac IIci
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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.

 The Mac IIci was one of the most popular 68k Macintosh models. The 13-inch Apple RGB display doubled as space heater for small rooms. Mini Steve Jobs is an added bonus.

PowerMac G4 Cube

The PowerMac G4 Cube was the father of the Mac Mini, and grandfather to the upcoming Mac Pro. Beneath that, boxed Macintosh software from System 7 to Snow Leopard.

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Courtesy @Adam Rosen, Vintage Mac Museum.