How to use two powerful tools to collaborate on writing projects

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Literature... and latte. Photo illustration Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

 

These days you can easily share data and collaborate on almost anything, from Rdio playlists to photo streams. But when it comes to plain old written text, your options are terrible. You’re pretty much caught between working on a shared file in Google Docs or shuttling versions of your work back and forth via email. Add more than one collaborator and this becomes a total nightmare.

Thankfully, tools exist to smooth the process of collaborating on writing projects. I’m currently editing the second draft of a novella, and I’m looking for a way to work with “beta” readers. I’m testing several pieces of software, and so far one called Draft is in the lead. Not only does it let you share a document with other people, it lets the team comment on any part of the source document and also allows them to edit a copy. Then, when they submit their versions, you can preview any changes before accepting or rejecting them.

Better still, because Draft can sync with a document in Dropbox (as well as several other cloud services), you can sync the edits from your beta team with a local app, like Scrivener. Here’s what you need to make the collaborative magic happen.

Handy Photo 2 Editing App Really Is Handy

After Facebook snapped up the Oculus Rift, a VR headset maker, we wondered what companies Apple should buy before Mark Zuckerberg or Google got their hands on them. Which of these companies should Apple buy with its mighty cash horde?  Fitbit, Sonos, Telegram.org, Square, Leap Motion, Zstat, Here
After Facebook snapped up the Oculus Rift, a VR headset maker, we wondered what companies Apple should buy before Mark Zuckerberg or Google got their hands on them. Which of these companies should Apple buy with its mighty cash horde? Fitbit, Sonos, Telegram.org, Square, Leap Motion, Zstat, Here

Handy Photo has gone from v1 to v2, and has changed from an app I apparently installed and then discarded to something that looks very useful indeed for the mobile photographer.

The update brings iOS 7 support, a complete redesign of the interface, and some sweet new features.

How To Use The iOS 7 Photos App To Edit Right On Your iPhone [iOS Tips]

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Sure, you can use something like iPhoto to really dig in and edit your iPhone photos, but if you just want a simple, no frills simple edit or two–plus some nifty filters if you have an iPhone 5 and up–the built-in Photos app in iOS 7 is a pretty great choice. It’s easy to use, and you already own it.

We showed you how to apply the new iOS 7 filters in yesterday’s tip post, so let’s look at the other four options available to you: rotate, auto-enhance, red eye, and cropping.

Promise Technology First To Announce Thunderbolt 2 Peripherals

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We know that the new Mac Pro — and as we learned earlier this week, the new MacBook Pros — sport new Thunderbolt 2 ports, which double the speed of the initial version to a maximum throughput of 20GB/second.

All that speed is academic without peripherals designed specifically for Thunderbolt 2. So today, Promise Technology is the first company to announce Thunderbolt 2 stuff — namely, their Pegasus2 RAID storage boxes and SANLink2 Fibre Channel-to-Thunderbolt 2 SAN device bridge.

iMovie Gets Huge, Awesome Upgrades, But Leaves One Or Two Big Holes

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This is it — we’re entering a golden age of video. Thanks to processor and camera upgrades that allow phones and tablets to shoot high-quality video, edit them then turn around and very quickly share them with pretty much any audience.

Apple has obviously realized this, and beefed up the populist iMovie, on both the Mac and iOS.