Apple’s Television Set Will Be Powered By A Custom-Built Processor Like Its iOS Devices [Rumor]

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Like its iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch which utilize the company’s A4 and A5 processors, Apple’s upcoming television set will be powered by a custom-built chip made specifically for the Cupertino company. Sources claim that a number of manufacturers are currently bidding for Apple’s order, including Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), Advanced Semiconductor Engineering (ASE), and Siliconware Precision Industries (SPIL).

Infinity Blade II: 40 New Locations, 10 Million Hitpoint Baddies And More, More, More

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Some people count down the days until Christmas, but for me, Christmas is coming early this year with the December 1st debut of Chair Entertainment’s Infinity Blade 2, their widely-anticipated sequel to a game I still think is an elegiac action masterpiece.

I’ve only got another three weeks to wait, but in the meantime, Justin Davis over at IGN got a chance to take Infinity Blade 2 for a hands-on. What to expect? Don’t expect just a couple new areas, a few new helmets and a cool new sword or two. This isn’t just a phoned-in sequel, it’s a generational leap at least four times beefier than the first game… already one of the most sizable titles on the App Store.

How Would Apple Make A $50 iPhone? [iFixIt Q&A]

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Earlier this week, a report surfaced claiming that Apple is currently working on a more affordable model of its iPhone 4, which is set to launch alongside the iPhone 5 later this year. The device will reportedly be aimed at those looking to purchase an iPhone with a tight budget, and will have just 8GB of storage in order to keep costs down.

This got us thinking: how would Apple bring down the price of an iPhone 4 to appeal to low-cost subscribers? How exactly would they make an iPhone 4 that would cost $50 or so with a two year contract? We’ve been speaking to Miroslav Djuric of iFixita popular online repair shop that produces how-to repair guides and tear-downs — to try and find out, and we think we know how Apple would do it. Here’s how.

This Is How ARM Saved Apple From Going Bust in the 90s

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Apple has built the majority of its modern day fortunes upon the back of the low-voltage ARM chipset. Ever since the first iPhone, ARM chips have driven Apple’s biggest and best-selling products. Thanks to the success of iOS, which only runs on ARM, the futures of Apple and ARM are so intertwined that Cupertino now designs its own custom specced ARM chips.

Given how forward thinking Apple is, it probably wouldn’t surprise you to hear that the Mac maker once bought a 43% stake in ARM back in the early 1990s. What probably would surprise, you, though, is that Apple sold that stake at a loss… and that sale saved the company from total bankruptcy.

Apple’s A4 Chip Could Be The Minimum Requirement For Running iOS 5

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With iOS 4, Apple left the original iPhone and iPod Touch behind in the dust of iOS 3.1.3, and even the iPhone 3G could not avail itself of some of iOS 4’s most notable features, like multitasking. As long as you at least had an iPhone 3GS, though, you’d be fine.

Given how many problems the iPhone 3G hardware had running iOS 4.0, it should come as no surprise that Apple is hoping to consign that hardware to the dustbin when they debut iOS 5 at WWDC next month. What may be more surprising is that the iPhone 3GS will go into the dustbin too.