Apple confirms iPhone 6 NFC chip is only for Apple Pay at launch

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iPhone6NFC

Apple finally added NFC to the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, but if you were hoping that the company’s new NFC chip will allow you to pair speakers or integrate NFC tags into your favorite apps, you’ll have to keep waiting. Apple has put its NFC chip on lockdown, at least for now.

Sources at Apple have confirmed to Cult of Mac that the NFC chip on the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus will only be used for Apple Pay when it launches this week.

Like Touch ID on the iPhone 5s, Apple is keeping NFC closed off from developers at launch. The company declined to comment on future plans for the NFC chip, but unlike Touch ID on the iPhone 5s, you won’t find any Apple marketing materials promoting the addition of NFC as a major iPhone 6 feature, as it’s touted as just a component of Apple Pay.

NFC products can be put to all sorts of creative uses, from pairing devices, to sharing files, launching apps, or even automating your entire house. Bluetooth LE has been Apple’s go-to communication protocol for iBeacons and other location services, but opening the NFC chip up to developers could quickly expand the iPhone’s capabilities in the future.

All is not lost for developers hoping to see NFC API’s in the future, as the NXP-manufactured NFC chip Apple is using in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus appears to be capable of providing open access to the NFC controller, according to experts PC Advisor spoke with at RapidNFC.

Apple has already showed that its NFC chip has extended capabilities beyond Apple Pay. For example, the Apple Watch was demoed unlocking a hotel room with NFC at last week’s Apple event. That indicates some partners will get NFC access before it’s opened to all developers.

Considering that its touch-less payments system is brand spanking new, it’s not surprising Apple wants to keep access tight while testing the NFC waters.

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  • Bash

    “NFC opened to developers”_ In Next WWDC

    • ScottieDont

      “AND ALSO, FREE TO ALL iPHONE USERS, FREE CREED ALBUMS!!!! YEAHYEAHYEAHYEAHYEAAAAAAAAH!!!”

      • Sasha

        No, free nickelback.

  • Stetch

    Well thats stupid. There are many places where Apple Pay won’t be available at all.

    • Kr00

      Its a totally new and secure way of paying. How do you expect it to work on older and less secure systems?

      • Stetch

        They could just have it open to other solutions. At least I want the option. If my local store doesn’t want Apple Pay but chose another NFC solution i´m pretty much out of luck. It´s still NFC but configured to only work with Apple Pay.

      • Tallest Skil

        Or, no, they could keep it actually secure and not use old crap.

      • Stetch

        I don’t know how secure/insecure the other NFC systems are. But if Apple Pay is as secure they claim it to be then fine.

      • Ambert Xie

        Um Apple Pay is just an implementation of NFC, they are just not allowing developers access to the hardware. There’s nothing new or special about it.

      • Tallest Skil

        And? Why would they use an older system and compromise security?

      • Jack

        Not Apple =/= Older

      • Tallest Skil

        Given that all existing systems are not Apple systems and that Apple’s system is released in the future, they are, by definition, older.

        Do you know of any other systems use security of Apple’s implementation?

      • Ambert Xie

        This is the simplest way I can explain it. They are using the exact same technology. Apple is not doing anything new or special or amazing. The only difference is on Android developers can use the hardware for other purposes like sending files between phones, pairing speakers or connecting to your new wifi camera. Apple doesn’t allow this, why? Most likely because they can save it for the iPhone 6s and sell more devices.

        And there is nothing special about Apple’s security. Jennifer Lawrence’s private photos were not hacked from Google Drive or Microsoft Skydrive…

      • Tallest Skil

        >>They are using the exact same technology.

        Not really, but whatever you want to believe.

        >>Apple doesn’t allow this, why? Most likely because they can save it for the iPhone 6s and sell more devices.

        Yes, that’s a software API, so it wouldn’t be restricted to hardware. Also, I wasn’t discussing opening up the NFC to anything.

        >>Jennifer Lawrence’s private photos were not hacked from Google Drive or Microsoft Skydrive…

        So you and five other idiots don’t have a clue what actually happened here. Thanks for letting us know.

      • Ambert Xie

        “Not really, but whatever you want to believe.”

        Um, yes really did you even read up the specs. They both use NFC, Apple’s new super awesome security feature is just a Secure Element which Android has had for years except Android doesn’t feel the need to make up these new names to try and sell their outdated products. Read for yourself.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Pay
        https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/connectivity/nfc/hce.html

        “Yes, that’s a software API, so it wouldn’t be restricted to hardware. Also, I wasn’t discussing opening up the NFC to anything.”

        Exactly, there are no hardware restrictions to hardware. And there are no reasons not to implement the API so developers can take advantage of your new feature.

        “So you and five other idiots don’t have a clue what actually happened here. Thanks for letting us know.”

        Judging from your comments and your lack of actual knowledge about the tech behind the products and the way you continue to fall victim to Apple’s marketing hype you’re the one who doesn’t know what’s happening here.

      • RichR67

        Her photos and anyone else’s that were illegally downloaded were gotten due to weak passwords not Apples fault just like it wouldn’t be Googles fault nor Microsofts unfortunately there is still no cure for the lame passwords we sometimes come up with

      • me

        did apple put iphone6 up your ass for your bullshit?

      • Tallest Skil

        What exactly is incorrect about what I’ve said?

      • Real

        Everything, actually. You obviously can’t read, either, or you would’ve seen the answers that everyone gave you.

      • Kr00

        Its been mentioned it will be opened up to developers in the next year. I think trailing this before opening it into the wild is a good thing, no?

      • mutie

        The near field spec is eight years old. That’s “new”?

      • Kr00

        Apple Pay secure encryption transfers between banking institutions is new. Didn’t you listen to the keynote? Does the NFC payments of 8 years ago have that?

      • Ambert Xie

        Short answer. Yes. If you ever tried to read your credit card’s NFC on your phone you will see that it is encrypted, I’m sorry you have an iPhone so you can’t try this.

      • Camarena

        That isn’t new either. Tokenization payments existed before apple.

      • Hoek

        I think thats the problem here, you did listen to the keynote, and believed every word that was said, come on, you know Apple, they always do this, make claims about something new when really its no different except the name.

      • Daz

        I have been using Secure NFC payments for a few years now. Google Wallet has been around for years now and allows you to store all of your credit cards in digital form and pick which one you would like to pay with. All Data is encrypted and I have never had any issues aside from some stores not having the correct equipment to support NFC. Apple has not launched anything new with the Iphone6….at all. The specs of the phone are 3+ years old in comparison to Android based hardware, the screen resolution is not higher and has less PPI than most newer Android devices and they decided to cripple the functionality of NFC. I suspect they only make minor upgrades with each release because the fan-base cant understand how to use more than one new feature at a time. They keep the technology old for the same reason.

      • mutie

        Apple’s software is new. It makes sense to keep the code closed. Implementing NFC chips in this kind of device is not new, and preventing developers from creating applications that exploit its capabilities (even if that prohibition is for a definite period), cannot be justified under the claim “because it’s new.”

        See the difference?

      • Real

        You, sir….you deserve a cookie.

      • mutie

        Excellent. I like cookies. I also like fruit, including apples.

      • guest guy

        Someone’s been drinking the Koolaid.

      • Kr00

        Ahh, you forgot to throw in the word fanboy, that would’ve given you the royal flush of troll poker. If you can’t keep up, I’ll write it down in crayon for you if you like? Its about the technology stupid! Keep up. Fandroid page is next door.

      • Real

        Keep up? LMAO….this coming from a fan of 2012 hardware & 2007 software? Riiiiight….

        Still can’t multitask, can you? Awwww….

    • Guest

      This is planned, to force NFC-holdout companies to adopt the tech to accommodate iPhone users ONLY.

      And it will work, with the penetration Apple has with the consumers.

      • puralien12

        True. The good news for everybody is that I bet Google will adopt their own standard in Android and be able to utilize the same hardware Apple is paving the way with. Win-win.

      • Josh

        What? Google Wallet works on every NFC capable credit card reader and the implementation of NFC in Android is compatible with every NFC-pairing system out there. What exactly do you mean? There is nothing unique to Apple’s use of NFC as a payment option except they’re not making it usable by your everyday iPhone user.

      • puralien12

        When I mean paving the way, I don’t particularly mean Apple’s hardware. I’m talking about the hardware Apple is pushing all these companies to get. So, take McDonalds for example. Apple pushed McDonalds to get the hardware. Google will probably also be able to take advantage of that hardware.

      • Josh

        Have you heard of paypass? It’s been at McDonald’s for years, as well as other retailers, and that is how I’ve been using my Android phones to pay for my nuggets. Certain companies have to invest in the hardware that haven’t already, but Apple hasn’t succeeded where Google failed in this initiative yet; see Best Buy.

      • Guest

        Best Buy is still saying no, even to Apple, unless something changed since yesterday.

        Best Buy wants people to use CurrentC.

      • Josh

        Excatly

      • SearchBot2000

        Sadly, this is a problem with the majority of consumers, they are so uninformed they believe anything a company (not just apple) tells them. ALL of the vendors listed at the apple pay presentation already had NFC readers. Any place listed works with google wallet, like McDonald’s. More eye opening details here: http://mashable.com/2014/09/15/a-sober-look-at-apple-pay/

      • Ambert Xie

        I am literally using my Galaxy S4 to pay for purchases at any store which accepts paypass. Apple’s hardware will never achieve the market penetration that Mastercard or Visa can and Android devices can already work on the hardware that supports the 2 largest card companies.

      • Me Ted

        Congratulations. This is the dumbest thing I’ve ever read.

      • Josh

        Don’t be too mean, it was a statement made out of a misunderstanding of the service; it was discussed further :)

      • Me Ted

        You’re right. I shouldn’t have said that. I apologize.

        Look. Let’s be honest; we ALL need Apple to open this up because merchants won’t budge without them. I’m a staunch Android user but love my AppleTV and Macbook Pro so I have no bias either way. I just want NFC payments for the masses on all platforms and Apple will most certainly lead the way.

      • Ambert Xie

        Apple has 11% of the smartphone market, Android has 84%. If I were a business why would I lock myself in with the minority when i can adopt PayPass/PayWave from Mastercard and Visa which also works with Android.

      • Dandy

        Because that 11% is fucking powerful.

        Because that 11% will have the majority of usage, outweighing the last half decade combined.
        Because that 11% will normalize and standardize for the other 84% who haven’t, yet.
        Because that 11% will expand drastically as the technology makes their way through the Pipeline (consumers and businesses).

        That 11% is profitable enough to want, even if 84% is a bigger number. People will cater to the 11% because they can get more from them.

      • Hoek

        If you were Apples CEO they would have crashed a long time ago, that sort of thinking you have typed is just not business like, its not how it works plus the bullcrap in your comment makes it worse.

      • PMB01

        Seems you don’t know anything about the smartphone industry. Go educate yourself before looking dumb.

      • Hoek

        What/who are you responding to? because that sure as hell had nothing to do with my last comment.

      • PMB01

        You’ve proved my point.

      • Hoek

        yeah sure smh

  • Kr00

    I don’t understand your problem. Apple have developed a new unique, and totally secure way of NFC payments, yet you expect it to work the old way? Please explain?

    • Guest

      The problem is, it’s NOT new or unique. Other companies have been doing/trying to do this for years. Notice how Google Wallet is still limited to the United states? Retailers have to get on-board with payment methods for them to become available. Making it proprietary and closed to development makes the system less attractive. Hope they at least support PayPal transactions (those, at least seem to be popping up around places). What we really needed from Apple was for them finally get on board with NFC integration standards with this new iPhone to pave the NFC way to make secure transactions JUST LIKE RFID creditcards do. We need them to adopt standard tech that everyone uses, to make the technology available to everyone, and thus used by everyone, not just iPhone users. As usual, Apple’s more concerned about selling iPhones and charging licensing fees than forwarding technology. I don’t see anything innovative here at all.

      • Chipo

        RFID credit cards only work under a pre-paid model, you have to top up your balance. It doesn’t replace a standard credit card transaction, and has higher processing costs due to the reduced security. What Apple did is make NFC payments as secure (or more) than chip & pin, by securing and restricting access to the NFC chip and payment data, so it can get lower ‘card present’ processing rates. It’s a whole different game.

      • Damarkus13

        No they didn’t. Pay pass, the NFC standard for credit cards, is already exactly the same as an EMV transaction (chip & pin) and it is the standard that Apple pay is compatible with. The only possible “new” tech involved is on Apple’s side. The actually nfc transaction is exactly the same as Discover, Visa, MasterCard, and yes, even Google wallet have already been using. The credit card processing company had no way of knowing if your NFC chip is accessible to other apps, and if the standard is followed, it doesn’t add any security to the transaction.

      • cajhne

        Untrue, both of my VISA cards have RFID chips, neither is “pre-paid”, and both have been standard credit cards since before NFC first came to mobile phones 3 years ago. NFC/RFID came to creditcards first, then mobile later.

      • gordonbrown

        um… you are so wrong dude. Contactless credit card payments do not run on a “pre-paid model” and they are considered contactless with merchant side cvm limits or card present and more secure than a regular credit card pr chip and pin transaction. There is no balance to “top up” unless that is some specific requirement to your country. What apple has done here is to negotiate for a rate category other than card present or card not present but rather “card holder present”

        http://bankinnovation.net/2014/09/visa-mastercard-in-talks-with-mobile-wallets-for-cardholder-present-rate/

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contactless_payment
        http://www.mastercard.us/merchants/paypass-benefits.html
        http://www.mastercard.com/us/company/en/whatwedo/interchange/Intra-EEA.html
        https://usa.visa.com/download/merchants/Visa-Interchange-Reimbursement-Fees-April-2014.pdf

      • Kr00

        How so? Is touch ID apart of any other NFC system? No. Is secure encryption keys between user and bank used in any other system? No, not like this it isn’t. May I suggest you have a look at the keynote and see how completely different this payment method is to the current one. Then come back to me and tell me it isn’t new, or unique. I gather you don’t have an issue being informed do you?

      • yessuz

        ffs. touch ID is not necessary for NFC to be secure. Most credit card payments are limited to some kind of 20 Pounds or something.
        moreover, touch ID can be hacked probably easier than 4 digit pin.

      • PMB01

        Nope, Touch ID is VERY difficult to hack. That’s why it’s called the Secure Enclave!

      • Hoek

        Really? seems pretty easy on the youtube videos.

      • PMB01

        Don’t believe everything you see on YouTube. Touch ID is the most secure authenticator we have on a phone.

      • Hoek

        Well you know if it was someones opinion on youtube then yeah i wouldnt believe it without some evidence but the finger print scanner is shown in several videos how easy it is to hack, they actually show it being done and its very easy. There were several videos going around, i think it was 24 hours after the phone was released that someone hacked it, was in the media and everything.

      • PMB01

        Those videos showed it could be done, but the amount of effort it took was enough of a deterrent for most and it just wasn’t good for anything then. Even now, the iCloud security features make the combination of ApplePay and Touch ID one of the most secure transactions outside of using cash. And before you say it, yes iCloud is secure.

      • Real

        THIS is how celebrity nude pics are brought to everyone…’cause the folks that use iPhone aren’t intelligent enough to know better THAN TO TAKE NUDE PICS WITH THEIR PHONES!!!!

        That deserved to get hacked….and it’ll get hacked again.

      • PMB01

        Not all of them used iPhones, dumbass.

        You people that don’t know proper grammar deserve to get hacked.

      • cajhne

        Tacking excessive extra amounts of security onto an existing technology isn’t innovation, it’s selling crash helmets to people walking down the street “just in case”.

    • cajhne

      Just a little disappointing that NFC finally comes to iPhone, and it’s only usable for mobile payments in the States. Meanwhile, NFC has been integrated into numerous other tech devices worldwide, none of which will be usable on the iPhone until they allow development access to it.

      • Kr00

        If a new and secure way of payment is being employed here, with touch ID as the key, and encryption transfers between user and institution, how could it work with the current, insecure system? I’m not sure people understand how different this is to the current payment system.

      • yessuz

        it is not new and not something significantly more secure.
        it’s been here for years.

      • cajhne

        I’m talking about NFC tags, doorlocking systems, automatic bluetooth pairing, home automation, task automation, etc. Regardless of how much you think the extra security on the payment feature makes it “different”, it’s still NFC hardware, and should be able to perform other NFC tasks, besides just the novelty of paying for things with a phone (Android users have been doing that for years now, it it never seems like that big of a thing). It’s disappointing to high-tech iPhone, and Android users alike that it’s locked down. When a popular phone manufacturer continues to drag its heels on implementing the standards for NFC, it keeps a large portion of the tech-buying market from adopting the features and forwarding the innovative technology. I have no idea why you are so excited about being able to pay for things with your phone. It’s not at all anything new, and there has not been a single report since the technology came out of anyone having security issues. You think adding even more security to it is somehow helpful, but it’s like adding an extra seatbelt to your car over your current one. Look! Safer! How innovative! :P Most of us would trade the extra security for a fully functional NFC reader that conforms to NFC standards. The waiting continues.

    • the_real_patrick_bateman

      can’t tell if trolling or serious.

      • Kr00

        Not sure if hypocritical troll calling others a troll. Hows life under the bridge?

      • Real

        I wouldn’t know…I’m too busy rolling over your corpse.

    • Shane Bryson

      The problem is the dozens of other ways I would want to use this to pay for things. For instance, with Square, with Paypal, with Google Wallet and the may other services I use. This is restricting and discouraging and honestly it’s a deal breaker for me. Off to Android I go.

      • Kyle Baity

        Have fun. Your NFC chips won’t work at McDees or Target or Subway, or any other place that has picked up ApplePay. You think Apple isn’t smart enough to have them sign a contracting agreeing to only their option for NFC payments? Better get a new wallet; looks like yours will be floating around with you for a good while longer.

      • Josh

        You’re kidding, right? I’ve been using my Android phones to pay for my food at McDonald’s since Google Wallet was released; in fact, I use my phone everywhere a paypass NFC reader is located, for instance, at CVS. I’m not sure you understand exactly how NFC payments work.

      • Kyle Baity

        Most definitely do understand. But if a merchant contracts to use ApplePay, I would bet my bottom dollar that they have locked that thing up so that PayPal can’t access it, and definitely not Google Wallet.

      • Josh

        Merchants don’t “contract” with ApplePay, Apple just gets a cut of the transaction on top of the issuing financial institutions, credit card companies, payment processors, etc.

      • Kyle Baity

        Fair enough. My assumption was that Apple would require theirs be the only NFC chip to process payment at these places. Regardless, I don’t see the “crippling” that is suggested here. PayPal, Google Wallet, and other NFC payment apps offer nothing else that ApplePay won’t cover. I’m all for going to Android: I didn’t buy an iPhone 5 and went with an S4 instead, and it integrated terribly into my life.

      • Josh

        I work for vzw, and I can tell you that it doesn’t matter what phone you get, there is going to be a huge disruption to your current “ecosystem”. What is more important is to get new technology based on how you want to use it in the future, not how it will necessarily fit into your current lifestyle.

        I think ApplePay is good, ultimately, for consumers, but it is going to take a couple of years for Apple to give that realization to their customers.

      • Kyle Baity

        I think my point coincides with yours: I buy for what I need for the future, not what I necessarily need now. Ergo, I buy my phones with a software that doesn’t require rooting 3 months from now to run smooth or a routine wiping. I buy what works, what is supported, and what fits my life in the future. Google had my time for 2 years to prove that it was better for me than my iOS devices. Instead, after 4 routine wipes and rooting just to get a barebones Android experience, I want something that works from the day I take it out of the box through the day I sell it on Craigslist or Ebay.

      • Josh

        There isn’t an Android phone out there today that requires rooting or routine wipes to function properly; The issues fixed by wiping a phone is an issue shared by every electronic device out there. Our points may coincide in certain areas, but you are drastically overstating the difference between both types of devices since they both function for approximately the same length of time before positive user intervention.

      • Kyle Baity

        The wife has an S4. It lags terribly, even just to open her Google Calendar app, or her phonebook. Not sure where the “isn’t an Android phone out there” statement is founded. On the contrary, I switched back to my iPhone 4S and my S4 was successfully sold off, and have never, ever had to reinstall iOS. It’s running like a champ, while my wife’s > 6 months-old S4 struggles to day trivial functions.

      • Josh

        As I said earlier, I work for vzw and I deal with thousands of phone issues, and none are unique to a platform. I’ve got HTC One’s that slow down (overloaded with apps and data, have virtually no storage left, and have uptimes of months without a restart). I’ve also got iPhone 5s’s that lag after updates, have increasing terrible battery life as time wears on, and also have low storage availability with obscene uptimes. The S4 is not slow due to its own merits, and your 4s’s performance is not due to its own merits, either. It all comes down to the user; the best phones run like crap when treated as such.

      • Kyle Baity

        Well, the insinuation that my wife’s phone is treated as (crap) is unfounded and untrue. On the contrary, I’m not sure that I have ever seen her misuse, mistreat, or even mishap with her phone. Case from day one, minimal storage used, and apps that free up RAM and storage space as necessary.

        I haven’t run into battery life issues with my iPhones, as I’m not a constant social media searcher, nor do I use the GPS to take my normal route to work. I agree, technology will always have a lemon factor involved. It has been my experience that either our phones (both S4’s) are lemons, or this is how they are destined to operate.

        One last thing: respect for working for vzw. My vzw affiliate store does great work, removing those crap charges (like activation fees). No doubt you’ve helped inform many people on their cellular needs.

      • Josh

        I didn’t mean to comment on your wife’s use, just the use of phones in general. They’re just tools and only respond as well as our expectations/use of them.

      • Christian

        From what I can remember, apps that “free up RAM” or quit apps are more likely to cause long term problems on your device.

      • cajhne

        And like any OS, you could speed the S4 back up by going on a forum and finding out how to do so. Look, it even works for an iPhone 4s’s 5-smegging second lag problems: http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/102232/keyboard-extremely-sluggish-on-ios7-with-iphone-4s

      • Ambert Xie

        This will never happen as my Android’s NFC payment will work wherever Mastercard or Visa’s NFC is accepted and Apple will never overtake these two giants. Especially since iOS only counts for 11.7% of global smartphones compared to Android’s 84.7% and iOS is only shrinking year on year.

      • cajhne

        Even if that were true, this is a good thing in your mind? Evil underhanded artificial restrictions bought by Apple to keep the competition (and therefore consumer choice) down by any means necessary. You really hate having a choice? Why would you buy from a company that does that? Sounds like paying for your own prison.

      • Kr00

        Then enjoy. If this one thing is going to force you over to android (I’m pretty sure you’re already there) then good luck. Theres plenty of fragmentation there too. Live and let live.

        Apple will be throwing this open to developers into next year as they are doing with touch ID now.

      • Josh

        Fragmentation? What do you call the ipads, ipad minis, iphone 4/4s/5/5s/5c/6/6+? Just because they run the same name operating system doesn’t mean they aren’t fragmented; Apple has dropped the fragmentation argument and built into their new OS a dynamic app scaler to fit different apps on different hardware. Regardless, only the 6/6+ can use the payment system, which isolates the rest of iphone users, and thus, creates “fragmentation”; Willful ignorance is worse than simple ignorance.

      • Real

        Your, Sir…you also deserve a cookie.

      • Josh

        No oatmeal raisin, that was invented by the devil himself.

      • cajhne

        So, when is Siri coming to the iPhone 4? How about Apple Watch integration on the 4s? Plenty of fragmentation there, and OS updates that dramatically slow down the phone. Co-worker of mine, long time Apple fan switched to a waterproof Sony Xperia Z because iOS7 made her iPhone 4 so slow it was unusable. Still think she would have been better off with Samsung’s gNote 3, though 35hour talk-time, a day and a half worth of regular battery and a stylus for drawing (she’s a designer) would have been pretty sweet too.

  • melly dee

    Apple are only locking down NFC while they concoct more ways to skim off micro-fees for each transaction. Funnily enough, I’ve used NFC for nearly three years now, without any security issues. If Apple take another year to expand the use of NFC on their devices it’s purely a ruse. Why anyone would pay for a nanny-State-device is beyond me.

  • mr

    Could the NFC chip be somehow used to receive payments from other iPhone 6 users? Sort of like square but without the dongle?

    • ptaav

      Sure, if Apple wanted it to. But this is an ALL NEW FORM OF PAYMENT controlled by Apple. So, the answer is: no.

      Also, buy an iPhone 6 or else.

      • ScottieDont

        And get a damn Apple Watch, or your mother will give someone else her meatloaf, loser.

  • su2lly

    If progress was a boat, Apple would be the anchor.

    • lawlwut123

      Apple? The guys who ditched the floppy drives first, ditched the optical drives first, moved to flash-based storage first, adopted USB and FireWire and ThunderBolt first, and co-founded ARM? THEY’RE the anchor? Ok.

      • Josh

        Fine, how about a more appropriate comparison: If progress was a spaceship, Apple would be the space shuttle.

      • Tallest Skil

        Yeah, it’s still wrong.

      • Josh

        Nope. The space shuttle was great when it was first invented, but it has long since outlived its usefulness and there have been multiple competing shuttle services that work better than the shuttle; hence, the decomissioning of the fleet.

      • NewWorldPress

        what’s so good about ditching optial drives, I prefer to own my movies ty very much

        what’s so good about Thunderbolt, the fact 99% of the my appliances use USB 3.0 instead?

      • Iramohs

        But Thunderbolt has a better name so it’s cooler.

      • Josh

        It’s electric!

      • Tallest Skil

        >>what’s so good about ditching optial drives, I prefer to own my movies ty very much

        The halves of this sentence have absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with one another. Enjoy your optical drive and SCSI ports. The rest of humanity doesn’t care.

      • Real

        Actually, the rest of humanity does. Tell your iClod to stop letting nudes be exposed to the world. Smart people keep their personal info PERSONAL…meaning: not able to be hacked!

      • Ambert Xie

        How about the company that stuck with PowerPC instead of Intel until 2005. And USB was developed originally by DEC, IBM, NEC, Intel, Nortel, Microsoft and Compaq. Apple is also the company who decided to only include 1GB of RAM on their latest phone and a 1,800mAh battery when the current Android flagships have 3GB and over 3,000mAh. The iPhone 6+ has a 1080p “Retina” display. My Android from 2 years ago already has this, along with 2GB of RAM and a 2,800mAh battery, I can even use the phone underwater.

        So yea comparatively Apple is the anchor.

      • Guest

        Yes, they are. Especially when it comes to smartphones. When you get full NFC support, a user-accessible (proper) file system, a replicable battery, expandable storage, a waterproof chassis, 3GB of RAM (it will still take more RAM than that to make use of that 64bit processor iFolks love to brag about but haven’t a clue what its main benefit is), 4K video, Quad HD screen, AMOLED (more of the visible light spectrum, true-black pixels, and ultra power saving control over individual pixels), a wacom stylus with 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity, front-facing speakers, a curved screen to display notifications on the rim, etc. etc. etc. you might understand. Or you just gonna go with “I don’t need all that stuff” argument?

      • cajhne

        And here I was just getting used to the floppy drive on my smartphone. Thanks a lot Apple! I also like how FireWire and ThubnderBolt really caught on as a thing. *looks over at a box filled to the brim with spare USB cables*

    • Tallest Skil

      Could you maybe take your FUD to somewhere people are stupid enough to believe it?

      • su2lly

        Is that the Scottish slang or something else? Just joking, no need to answer.
        When something is called Near Field Communication it generally should communicate with things. And when I say things I mean more things than my phone manufacturer decides to let me communicate with. But if you’re OK with that, good for you, enjoy your phone. I use the word “your” loosely of course.

  • PleaseDon’tSueme

    I’m scared to say anything about android on a website called cult of mac…

    • Josh

      Don’t be afraid, it may be cult of mac, but you can get some good information if you parse out the bias.

  • http://twitter.com/jdrch jdrch

    So Apple introduced something everyone else has had since 2012 as a crippled feature?

    • Kyle Baity

      Crippled? Maybe you haven’t heard about the NFC heists out in Vegas. People roam the streets with stolen merchant codes, cashing out $100+ every time they walk by an Android user with NFC turned on. No verification = no security. Apple has already shown that Touch ID is better than any other fingerprint system, and ApplePay will be nothing less than the high caliber they set for services. If anything is crippled, I would say it was the state of NFC before Touch ID was integrated.

      • ikt123

        How is that possible? My card struggles to paywave when i’ve got the card directly on top of the scanner, let alone when it’s in my wallet which is in my pocket half a meter away.

      • Josh

        Don’t worry, anecdotal evidence isn’t actual evidence. Just because NFC is turned on on a phone doesn’t mean the phone can get data pulled; there is a user interaction required that allows for the transfer, a la bluetooth. Credit cards with built-in NFC, however, is a different story because there isn’t software behind the usage, just another delivery system for the info; like the magnetic strip.

      • su2lly

        It’s not possible. Urban legend.

      • http://twitter.com/jdrch jdrch

        Yeah and you can disable NFC when you’re not using it, so what’s your point? My S5’s NFC is off except when I’m paying for something using it or scanning a tag.

      • Josh

        It is more-so a comparison of different technologies out there; and different modes are more susceptible to hijacking. Credit cards with built-in NFC are the most susceptible, but phones typically aren’t going to be. Sure, we may hear that someone got their information stolen from their phone through NFC, but we also hear stories about people getting viruses on their computers; security goes only as far as you take it.

      • su2lly

        Yeah…that never happened.

    • Kyle Baity

      Maybe you haven’t read up about 2012’s Defcon Hacker Conference.

      My suggestions are these two articles:

      http://www.informationweek.com/wireless/nfc-phone-hacking-and-other-mobile-attacks/d/d-id/1105508?

      http://www.marketwatch.com/story/little-known-ways-hackers-take-over-your-phone-data-and-money-2014-08-22

      On the second, pay particular attention to the PayWave section.

    • Tallest Skil

      So you think you can troll here and get away with it?

      • http://twitter.com/jdrch jdrch

        @Tallest_Skil:disqus I’m not trolling, I’m being factual.

      • Josh

        Don’t worry, Skil has been trolling so hard that they must think that every response is considered trolling.

      • Joshua Werstler

        I don’t think you’re holding your pom poms tight enough cupcake.

      • Real

        Please. Facts are being presented. Stop being a turd.

    • TheVoiceOfReason

      Basically, yes.

    • su2lly

      I thought when Steve passed that that would be an end to believing everything said on stage. I guess I was grossly mistaken.

  • Kingsley

    You may want to re-write that first “paragraph”. For someone who is a “professional” writer, that looks like a 4th grader strung it together. No wonder you work for a MAC fansite.

    • schlabotnik

      No kidding – that’s horrible

      • Josh

        It is horrible, but I’m sure it is an education thing, not a computer enthusiast thing.

        Ha, the original post is now under moderation; at this point, there are 6 “paragraphs” and only 1 contains two sentences.

        *edit: now we’re up to 7 “paragraphs” and 3 contain more than one sentence. Progress!

      • Kingsley

        Yep I’m seeing that now, too. They also edited the first paragraph – guess it was too much to proof-read the first time around.

  • lord eels

    I’d like to use NPC to pair my camera to my phone more easily. the current wifi arrangement is a real chore.

    somehow I knew apple would do this to NFC on iphone6.

    but my first reaction is WTF?!?! but odds are there is some unknown reason why this makes sense to apple, and I just haven’t figured it out yet.

  • M C
  • Harold Zoid

    This is less about enabling non-payment related NFC interactions and more about blocking other apps like Google Wallet.

  • Guest

    Question… If they’re limiting the NFC functionality to Apple Pay, how do you suppose they’re performing physical access to hotel rooms on the Apple Watch?

  • http://www.feastofbeast.com DJBabyBuster

    When the iOS8 jailbreak hits, I guarantee someone will develop a tweak to allow third party use of the NFC capabilities. I’m excited for my new iPhone, but its always a bummer having to return to limiting stock iOS while I wait out the next jb.

    • Bernard Wood

      Couldn’t agree more mate someone will open pandoras box, I hate going back to stock IOS also but hopefully with the Chinese in the works it won’t take too long for a JB

  • jonwerner

    The hotel door unlocking was based on BLE, at least that is what the Westin website says about their new mobile unlocking wireless tech.

  • Frank Stjerne

    This is funny. Try to take a ride at the Metro, a bus or pay in shop in Seoul i South Korea. You use your Samsung, LG or HTC as a credit card to pay. You just put the back of the phone on the plate at the counter or at the entrance of the metro, and you get a beep and get onboard. If you have an iPhone you have to buy a card at 7 eleven with the NFC chip inside, buy a special shielded iPhone cover and put the credit card sized chip card inside the cover. In South Korea it is the hight tech phone with the low tech solution. And the iPhone 6 seems to be still as low tech. Thank you Apple. I will look at all my fellow travelers and their Samsungs, LGs and HTC’s that has entered the future. Interesting to see, that in some areas Apple acts worser than the control freaks in the movie industry.

  • TheVoiceOfReason

    The funniest part about all these comments are the people who think Apple Pay is new technology. It’s just a different form of Tap-To-Pay with NFC that’s been around for many years prior to iPhone 6.

  • Miked

    What??? this is funny.

  • jack

    of course they won’t open.. so ppl won’t create competing payment methods

  • RMA

    wow as an employee of a large payment company I realize that we still have a long way to go in terms of ‘consumer education’. An NFC transaction is similar to a contactless card transaction based on EMV specification. It is secure and it is definitely not new. Apple and Google both work on the same principle. That is of using a technology that has been in place for many years. Card companies have the network, smartphone manufacturers have the devices, now we need more acceptance and therefore retailers to vastly adopt the technology. In that, Apple will definitely help paving the way given their huge market share in the US where by the way the EMV migration (chip&PIN) is FINALLY happening.

  • Bernard

    I’ll give it a week maximum after an IOS 8 JB and it’ll be opened up like the touch ID was so don’t worry about waiting for apple I’m sure someone like Ryan Petrich will beat them to the table