The iPhone 5 Is Incredible, But iOS 6 Is Holding It Back [Opinion]

The iPhone 5 Is Incredible, But iOS 6 Is Holding It Back [Opinion]

The iPhone 5 could be so much better.

The iPhone 5 is an incredible smartphone. I’ve been using mine since it arrived on my doorstep at 7:48 p.m. the day after launch day (after a painfully long wait), and I love it. It’s spectacularly thin and light, it’s beautiful — like most Apple products — and that larger display is such a welcome improvement.

I chose the white and silver model — I’ve had white iPhones for as long as they’ve been available — and I think it’s the prettiest gadget I’ve ever owned. It’s also powerful, and noticeably faster than my already snappy iPhone 4S. Its battery life is excellent, and so is the camera.

Overall, I have a long list of positive things to say about the iPhone 5 — the hardware is just unbeatable. But I think there’s one thing letting it down, and that’s iOS 6.

Before I jump in and tell you why iOS 6 is letting down the iPhone 5, let me just make one thing clear: I love iOS. It’s by far the most polished mobile platform there is, and it’s been my OS of choice since its debut with the original iPhone.

iOS “just works” — in so many ways. Its ability to sync with iTunes and iPhoto, and all the benefits that iCloud brings, make it a perfect companion for Mac users like me. It’s super simple to use — even my granddad’s using it — and the catalog of third-party apps available on iOS is second to none.

But as a technology writer, I’m often required to step outside my comfort zone and test other devices… devices that don’t run iOS. Since selling my iPhone 4S a couple weeks ago, I’ve been using a Samsung Galaxy Nexus, and prior to that I tested a long list of Android and Windows Phone smartphones.

Apple’s platform is the best of the bunch, but the gap between iOS and its competitors is getting ever smaller.

What I’ve learned along the way is that Apple’s platform is the best of the bunch, and for me, it’s the little things that make the biggest difference. But the gap between iOS and its competitors is getting ever smaller.

When Apple announced the original iPhone back in 2007, iOS — then called “iPhone OS” — was like nothing we’d ever seen before. Sure, we’d had touchscreen devices, but they were designed to work with tiny styluses that quickly got broken or lost, and they were slow and unreliable.

Apple kept making iOS better, adding things like iTunes and support for third-party apps through the App Store. These things took iOS way ahead of anything else, and that’s been the case for quite some time.

For the past few years, iOS hasn’t been taking the leaps it did in the early days.

But for the past few years, iOS hasn’t quite been taking the leaps it did in the early days. Apple has added new features and new services, some of which are really terrific, such as iCloud — as I mentioned earlier — and Siri. But there are some big things iOS is missing— things that other platforms gained a long time ago.

Widgets

I want widgets on iOS.

These things become more apparent when you use those other platforms for a few weeks. For example, Android’s widgets may not seem like a big thing to you, but try living with them for an extended period of time and you’ll miss them a lot when you go back to iOS.

Widgets let you add all kinds of things to your home screen, such as sports scores, the weather, music controls, settings toggles, your Twitter timeline, a breaking news feed… the list is endless.

Having these things in front of you right after unlocking your smartphone, without having to open up an app, is just fantastic. I felt the same way about Windows Phone’s live tiles after using an HTC Titan for a month.

I want widgets, or maybe even dynamic icons, on iOS. And I know this is a feature a lot of iOS users have been calling out for for some time. But Apple is yet to introduce it. It has added its own alternative to Notification Center in the form of Weather and Stocks “widgets,” but those have remained unchanged since iOS 5, and Apple is yet to offer us anything new.

You can add widgets yourself if you jailbreak, and those that are available through Cydia are… okay. But they’d be so much better if Apple supported them and allowed developers to create them for their apps. The iPhone 5’s larger display creates room for widgets, so let’s have them, Apple.

Quick Settings Toggles

Another feature iOS is missing is quick settings toggles. These allow you to quickly change common settings without having to open up your settings app. Android has them in the notification drop-down, allowing you to quickly toggle Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, the screen rotation lock, and the brightness of your display.

I don’t want to have to stop what I’m doing and open up the Settings app to enable/disable a feature.

And iOS should have them, too. I don’t want to have to stop what I’m doing and open up the Settings app to enable/disable a feature that could easily be nothing more than a switch at the top of Notification Center.

Default Apps

How about customizing our default apps? Mobile Safari is great, but I think Google Chrome is better. I love Mail, but I know others prefer Gmail or Sparrow. Apple should allow us to set third-party apps as our default apps, so that when you click on links in iMessage, you go straight into your favorite browser.

This may not be for everyone; beginners may just want to use Apple’s own apps. But Apple could allow more advanced users to enable their own default apps if they choose to.

Quick SMS Reply

This is a small feature that would make a big difference, I don’t know why it isn’t baked into iOS.

For me, one of the biggest reasons to jailbreak is for BiteSMS. There are many great features in BiteSMS, but the best is the ability to quickly reply to messages from wherever you are with quick reply.

When you receive a text message, BiteSMS presents you with a popup alert — just like iOS does. But within that popup, you can quickly reply to the message. You don’t need to step out of the app you’re in to go to Messages — you can just reply there and then. Once you hit send, you go straight back to what you’re doing.

This is a small feature that would make such a big difference, I don’t know why it isn’t baked into iOS. It’s not like our iPhones don’t have the processing power to handle a feature like this. The iPhone 5 is one of the fastest smartphones money can buy.
Again, this may not be for everyone; some people will prefer more subtle notification banners that don’t distract you. But it would be nice to have the choice.

Hiding Built-In Apps

As I mentioned earlier, some of Apple’s built-in apps are terrific. But others aren’t. Weather never seems to be accurate here in the U.K., and the information it provides is so basic you might as well just look out the window. While I can’t remember the last time I used Stocks.

I can understand why Apple doesn’t want us to remove these, however; people may accidentally delete essential apps. But why not let us hide the nonessential ones? They’re just taking up space on our home screens.

Maps

Finally, we come to Maps. I liked Google Maps in iOS 5; I wasted many hours playing around with Street View. But I do feel Apple’s new Maps app is a worthy replacement, in fact, I think Flyover and turn-by-turn actually make it a big improvement.

There’s no two ways about this: Apple has provided us with a new Maps app that just isn’t finished.

At least, that would be the case if it worked. There’s no two ways about this: Apple has provided us with a new Maps app that just isn’t finished. And this isn’t a minor feature that nobody’s bothered about. Maps is something a lot of us have come to reply on, but we can’t in iOS 6, because it doesn’t work properly.

I accept that it’s still early days and that Maps will improve over time. But maybe it needed a little more improvement before it went public? We can cope with a half-baked Siri, because no one had gotten used to a perfect Siri. But we had gotten used to an almost perfect Maps app.

Competitors Are Catching Up

For me, the absence of simple features like this is holding iOS back.

It’s not like these features are against Apple’s policies, either. I’m not asking for the ability to install apps from third-party sources, or support for themes and skins. I know these things will never come.

But I think the features I’ve mentioned could easily be introduced to iOS without going against all the things that Apple is about. What’s more, they wouldn’t just be great for the average user, but they’d also please more advanced users who are crying out for a little bit more.

For me, iOS is still the most complete package, but I do feel it’s missing several key features.

If you’ve only ever used iOS, some of these features may not be a big deal to you. But once you’ve had a taste of them on another platform, their absence begins to be a big issue. What’s more, I feel it’s encouraging users to go and try other platforms — many of whom never come back.

I have a handful of friends who were iPhone users for years. But they now own Android devices because of all the benefits Android brings. No, it’s not as polished. But its customization options and its flexibility make it a more exciting platform.

For me, iOS is still the most complete package, and the best mobile platform there is. But I do feel it’s missing several key features, and not quite evolving as quickly as it could be. This is giving its competitors a chance to catch up and provide an increasingly compelling reason to switch.

With that said, I absolutely love my iPhone 5 — just like everyone else who’s bought one. And it’s likely to be my daily driver for at least the next 12 months. But I feel it could be an even greater experience if iOS 6 wasn’t holding it back.

For now, I’ll probably jailbreak and add some of the features I’ve mentioned above myself in hope that future iOS updates will deliver some of the things the vast majority of us have been waiting for.

How do you feel about iOS 6?

  • djfurst5

    Nice article. Well said.

  • suzyz40

    IOS 6 is like an interim gift for I Phone 4s users who are dead center in the middle of a contract and can’t get their hands on an I phone 5 (as much as they would like to) I love the additions and improvements and having Siri on my I pad! Perfect timing.

  • Tallest_Skil

    Article reads like a standard troll post on any forum. The arguments he uses are copied and pasted straight from the list of things trolls always say. What is this filth? Why would any self-respecting person take this thing seriously?

    Author: So you’re whining every single time there’s an update to OS X because the Menu Bar and Dock are “stale”, huh?

    Or maybe that’s just the best setup and it doesn’t NEED changed.

  • dandy1117

    “an almost perfect Maps app”? bitmapped maps and no turn-by-turn? you may be correct that Maps needed more development before a public release (assuming that was a possibility given that the agreement between Apple and Google had terminated) to at least offer feature parity in addition to new features like yelp integration, turn-by-turn directions, and vector based mapping. But I think it is a bit of revisionist history to contend that the previous iOS maps app was near perfect.

  • FriarNurgle

    Apple is a master at holding the proverbial Trump cards in it’s hand.

  • mr_bee

    I agree with your basic point (that iOS is in need of some fixing), but I think your spec-driven, laundry list approach to the problem is all wrong.

    IMO it’s more that they need to really start over from scratch and “re-envision” the whole OS. They need to revisit *all* the decisions they made in the evolution of iOS, not necessarily because they are all wrong (in fact they are mostly right), but because they need to take a more holistic approach overall.

    What I find is that iOS has gotten “fuzzy” and indistinct. It’s getting confusing to use. It’s various parts don’t work well together and yet they just keep bolting features on to the outside without any real plan. Email is a perfect example in that the basic functionality is still not there and a lot of the details still don’t work, but this year we got two new features just laid on top of the crap that was already there. Features that can’t be removed even if we don’t use them.

    About the only thing I agree with is that they need to give users more options. As their customer base grows and grows, the old adage they have always lived by that “less is more,” is not actually relevant anymore. Different people have different needs and when everyone on the planet is using the same OS, you have to allow customisation to a larger degree than they are currently doing.

  • Matthew Gonzales Landry

    I think iOS 6 is magnificent. iOS 6 is probably the second biggest change to iOS behind iOS 5, which just brought iOS to a whole new level.

    Though iOS 6 isn’t as big as iOS 5, it’s still more than substantial. My favorite update to the iPhone were all the share options built into applications and into notification center.

    I love all of the Siri improvements as well. Being able to check the date of a released movie is really, really cool. More cool than that is being able to check for unreleased movies. Siri really does know a lot now. I hope Apple continues to teach her new things.

  • nvettese

    Sounds like you’d rather use Android instead. It was a good article, very well written, but I think you may have sold people on Android over iOS.

    Of course iOS is more polished than other mobile OSes, since Apple hasn’t really made many changes to the look and feel of it. I look at iOS today, and I see 2007 written all over it. I know that isn’t a bad thing to some, but back when I had a BlackBerry Storm, I was ridiculed about what a phone OS should look like. Now I see Android and I think, that’s what a mobile OS should look like. Even Microsoft’s offering is more modern and useful now.

    I am not sure what Apple has been doing lately. Remove Google Maps with a completely awful alternative, that even the software company has backed away from. Letterboxing for apps that do not conform to the iPhone 5s size? Steve Jobs would have never allowed these issues make it to the consumer. Yes, there may have been issues, but nothing like we are seeing now.

    In fact, the mistakes are so bad, and it has become so transparent, that even Apple’s stock went into the negative on launch day. When is the last time you saw that happen? Now Phil Schiller is telling buyers of the iPhone 5 that they should expect the paint to come off on their new phones… What???

    I said a year before Jobs passed away, that no one would be able to fill the role. I believe I may be correct in this statement. Tim Cook is ruining Apple and it is starting to show at the seams.

  • minimalist1969

    I agree with every single item on your wish list. Overall IOS is solid and I don;t think a radical rethinking is good for anybody but tech [pundits who demand to be dazzled each year and uberfans). But in my opinion the hallmark of a well designed piece of software is that it is simple and intuitive for casual users while offering depth under the hood for power users. Right now Apple is being way too timid about offering that depth under the hood. If anyone can give us that depth without ruining the core experience for your mom or granddad its Apple.

    The one thing I don’t want is my homescreen or lockscreen to start looking like a cacophony of clocks, buzzers and doodads like a really bad Android skin. Apple need to provide more flexibility for customizing the phone but they need to take the lead ion telling developers how everything needs to be formatted. Windows Phone live tiles seem to show that these things can be done in an ordered and beautiful way.

  • Whodakat

    Widgets let you add all kinds of things to your home screen, such as sports scores, the weather, music controls, settings toggles, your Twitter timeline, a breaking news feed… the list is endless.

    Keep going… I’m yet to hear a useful one. I think a Weather app with an updating temperature would be cool, but I don’t want my screen all cluttered, and that goes for Notification Center as well. I don’t want it filled with toggles. Now I would like to see Siri able to handle those requests, and with so many people whining I am kind of surprised they haven’t made that happen yet. But again, I’m a minimalist, which is one of the things that attracted me to Apple products, I hate the idea of my home screen looking like the NY stock exchange.

    Default Apps
    Would you like to make Chrome your default browser? Would you like to make Safari your default browser? Would you like to make me want to kill yourself? No thanks, I’ll pass. I do like Chrome, but only for a few specific things.

    Quick SMS Reply
    I’m a banners guy, but I suppose this could be useful. Click the banner and it gives me a pop up window to respond in. Not a bad idea. I’ll bet we see that eventually.

    Hiding Built-In Apps
    I could get down with that. Good bye stocks!

    Maps
    I feel bad your everyone outside of the US. I know its not perfect in the US either, but the real issues seem to be outside the US. I’ve been using it since the beta and its never failed me, so I can’t really complain. Now my time with Apple Maps has not been as long as I’ve used Google Maps, but Google has failed me several times and left me lost in a new city. Just my experiences.

    Competitors Are Catching Up
    The stuff you mention and the things I see fandroids claiming innovation about all seem fairly minor to me. I don’t even know what flashing a bootloader is or does, but I’m sure I don’t care. Change the intro when I turn on the phone? Honestly, I’m not watching it. The only thing I care about is how fast can I turn it on and get to my home screen. I don’t want anything slowing that down. Themes and skins? How would that differ from backgrounds? I hear themes, and I think of Windows. A changed background and icons to match it. Yawn. I understand people like this stuff, I did too, when I was 13. Now my attention span is a tad longer, and I’m more about getting things done than I am about making sure someone sees how cool I am for changing my power on intro.

    My concern, and I’m sure Apples as well is, what more can an mobile OS do? I think the complaints about little things like in this article and the customizations the fandroids want says it all. There really isn’t anything substantial to invent. Thats a tough position for an industry leader to be in, because people really do have short attention spans, and some people need change for the sake of change. Apple hates change for the sake of change. It will be interesting to see iOS 7.

  • ilesal

    Using Jellybean and IOS I understand what you are saying. Next Android “Key lime pie” or what ever it’ s going to be called will be both highly customizable and polished, but Apple IOS does now seem limited and it’s “walled garden” approach is stating to feel dated IMO. Perhaps after iTunes revamped UI maybe Apple will move to tweaking IOS?

  • SupaMac

    I agree with jailbreaking to add features, I have always done it. But you can’t deny that the phone works a hell of a lot faster, smoother, and better when it is not jailbroken. I always forget this until I use someone else’s iPhone that isn’t jailbroken or after I’ve restored my own. Kinda sucks that it makes it ‘laggy’… That being said, I am excited to have my i5 jailbroken as the hardware is much better and the lagginess may be negligible.

  • Skywaytraffic

    Very well written article. Nice work!

  • James Barnette

    I agree with everything except the Widget thing. That is the one of the things I hate most about Android is that the interface is littered with crap. that said I think being able to install more things to the notification center might be nice.

    I hear a lot of bitching about the new maps but I haven’t had a single issue with it thus far. I like it a lot better than the old one. and I love it compared the what is on my testing Nexus7

    Oh and I totally agree about needing to be able to hide some of the default stuff on the Phone especially I hate that I cant hide newsstand. WTF!!! I love news stand on my iPad but I’m never and have never used it on my effing phone! Why am I forced to have this and I cant even bury in a folder called useless crap!

    All this being said though I don’t think that iOS is holding the iPhone back in any way.

  • Sean Liu

    AGREED

  • cprblak

    Great points. Agreement here.

  • kavok

    And if Apple DOES implement most or all of these suggestions, they will be accused of stealing IP from Android and yadda yadda yadda. The fandroid trolls will be out in full force yet again saying how evil Apple is. Amazing how things have changed.

  • Mahler12x

    I still don’t get all the “controversy” regarding the Maps thing. I’m coming from an iPhone 4 and I can tell you, Siri + Turn by Turn + Yelp integration is as near to technology nirvana I’ve ever been!

    “Take me to Berkeley Bowl” beep beep, and I’m on my way! Almost there, I’m kinda hungry… “take me to a good Thai restaurant” beep beep, touch one, and I’m on my way!

    I had TomTom on my phone before and it was a pain in the ass to use if you needed to change directions, make a stop over, find a gas station, restaurant, etc. Pull over and type. Cross reference with Yelp, copy the address, hop back to TomTom, paste etc etc… fuck that! No MORE thanks to iPhone 5 and I’m LOVING it!

  • zenoran

    I always find it interesting when diehard apple fans slowly start seeing the light. Your article was complete with the majority of the key features of what has clearly pushed Android past the competition yet you kept repeating the fact that you still think iOS is superior. You would come up with an intelligent observation on a feature android has and iOS doesn’t but then follow it up with you still think iOS is better. No offense, but one might observe a tad bit of denial in your article based on the constant declaration of iOS loyalty and assurance to your readers that Android still isn’t your preference.

    Apple had a great operating system a few years ago but they stopped innovating their software by any measurable amount to keep up with the competition in recent versions. This is clearly evident in OSX as well. Their hardware engineering is beautiful and no one is denying that but that’s just simply not enough to keep their loyal fans coming back as they watch competing products continually improve the total experience of hardware and software.

    That said; I’m not an android fanboy or an apple fanboy. I own multiple expensive apple products including a rMBP and the iPad 3 I’m typing this on. However, I’ve owned every Nexus since the first one and have never been able to justify buying another iPhone for pretty much all the reasons you’ve clearly identified in this article. :)

  • muttleyuk

    Agreed about the weight. I think they’ve shaved off just enough so that it’s unnoticeable in my pocket. 112g is amazing. Makes the Nokia Lumia 920 at 185g look ridiculous!

    Oh, also, sorry for being a spelling Nazi but “Maps is something a lot of us have come to REPLY on….” ? Rely, surely?

  • proIvanPetrov

    Apple or Android phone? The mobile OS war has long been a two-player contest, with Apple iOS and Google Android , but I think IPHONE THE BEST http://nas.myftp.org/ios-6-versus-android-jelly-bean/

  • Bob Smogango

    Widgets? Where would you put these widgets? The problem with widgets is that it bloats the OS, hogs resources (CPU/GPU/RAM/Battery). They have the notification window with the weather. You really need to know the weather? 2 seconds sooner? come on. Seriously.

    Sports scores on the screen at all times? Why? That’s not useful information unless your a bookie.

    The other things I don’t see a big deal.

    I think that Apple should come out with a bigger 5 inch screen size for those that want a phablet size smartphone. That way people have a choice in screen size for those that don’t mind a two handed phone.

  • Bob Smogango

    I always find it interesting when diehard apple fans slowly start seeing the light. Your article was complete with the majority of the key features of what has clearly pushed Android past the competition yet you kept repeating the fact that you still think iOS is superior. You would come up with an intelligent observation on a feature android has and iOS doesn’t but then follow it up with you still think iOS is better. No offense, but one might observe a tad bit of denial in your article based on the constant declaration of iOS loyalty and assurance to your readers that Android still isn’t your preference.

    Apple had a great operating system a few years ago but they stopped innovating their software by any measurable amount to keep up with the competition in recent versions. This is clearly evident in OSX as well. Their hardware engineering is beautiful and no one is denying that but that’s just simply not enough to keep their loyal fans coming back as they watch competing products continually improve the total experience of hardware and software.

    That said; I’m not an android fanboy or an apple fanboy. I own multiple expensive apple products including a rMBP and the iPad 3 I’m typing this on. However, I’ve owned every Nexus since the first one and have never been able to justify buying another iPhone for pretty much all the reasons you’ve clearly identified in this article. :)

    The Android platform is like “Here is every conceivable feature just to have it because it makes a great demo”, but reality is no one uses most of those features. Much like Office apps. I’ve been using spreadsheet software since Visicalc and I still don’t use 90% of the features in Excel. Same goes with Word. I did a lot of writing in college, but rarely do I need to write more than maybe a simple business letter or text that doesn’t require much more than choosing a font and typing paragraphs worth of information.

    I think there is a struggle between ease of use, bloating the software to the point where it exceeds the resources of a smartphone, and what people actually use these things for on a daily basis. I’ve seen cool little features on the Android I would like to have, but I’ve seen a lot of things that are just not needed and just makes the thing far too complicated. I don’t want to have to spend 8 hours a day just to go through everything it has to see if I actually need it or not. If I was a kid with nothing better to do than play around with a smartphone maybe, but I’m not. One thing about the younger generation, many will realize there is more to life that spending 8 hours a day playing around with smartphone.

    I’ll stick with Apple’s approach and submit my “MUST HAVE” requests in their feedback site and hopefully I’ll get the feature. Usually, they do it, because the feature is something others want as well.

  • Chase Anderson

    I used to believe widgets were pointless, until my first Android phone. Now, I can’t imagine not having widgets. It’s crazy seeing most of the comments by Apple fans dissing the widgets and referring to them as litter. OK, they’re not for everyone but that’s fine because i can toggle my wifi, bluetooth, gps, data, screen rotation, and screen brightness in less than a third of the amount of time an iPhone user can; plus, if I so choose, I can set certain widgets to display information that I might find important and prefer to not spend several minutes navigating within an app to be informed of such content; Example: for parents, an app that has product safety recalls. One might not be informed of a potentially life-threatening (worst-case scenario) product unless they just so happen to be browsing through that particular app… and, surely I’m not the only one who might go days or even weeks without ever opening certain applications.

    Widgets are awesome, and as much as I am a huge fan of many generations of iPods (yes I am a music lover), having owned several generations of iPods and mostly relying on iTunes for managing my music, movies, TV shows and books, and despite being so deeply grounded within the iTunes ecosystem, I will never, ever own an iPhone until I can customize my home screens and other features.

    All of us, as humans, are unique and vast, all with different personalities and preferences on how we manage our lives and the routines and tasks therein; it ONLY makes sense to have the ability to customize a device, which we never leave home without, to suit our individual needs. The capability for adding widgets, changing lock screens, customizing keyboards, hiding non-essential apps, and home screen toggling features that drastically improve battery life are an absolute must for people who value conveniences just as much as they do individuality.

  • Adam203

    I received my IPhone 4 from my employer about 2 weeks ago (Government…had to get the free one). Prior to that I was using the DroidPro, which is a touchscreen device with a chicklet keyboard. I have to say I am disappointed in the Apple product. It is cumbersome to say the least to make phone calls, send text messages, and switch between apps. If I happen to be searching the app store or cruising online and I receive a text or email and I choose to open it, I can’t simply hit a back button and be right back at what I was doing. I have to hit the home button and re-open my app. Not a huge deal, but with the Droid I could simply hit a button and bam, back at it. The Droid also had a pop-up for the text app I was using, allowing me to reply without leaving my current app or opening my text app, and it had a voice control interface so I could hit a button in my text app and start talking, then hit send. No typing for the most part. Calling…this is the worst. With my Droid, I could swipe over a screen and there was all of my most common contacts (set by me like a speed dial), in widget form. I simply touched my wife’s picture and I was calling her. I really miss those features with my IPhone. Maybe with the 4S that my wife has it is a bit easier with Siri, but it still lacks. And for those who say it bogs down the phone? My Droid was as responsive as my IPhone. I suppose you could bog it down with widgets, but that is a choice. A choice I don’t have anymore. So far, I am unhappy with the switch. And I was delighted when I heard we were gonna give the IPhone a whirl. How about allowing 3rd party texting apps, such as GoSMS. I loved that app…it wasn’t on of those “send free sms” apps, but a full replacement for the Droid based app that came with the phone. Well we replace our phones every year…if enough of us gripe maybe we will head back to the Android market…

  • mikek5399

    This is a very well written article. I completely agree with you when you say that ios 6 holds the iPhone 5 back. I currently own an iPhone 4, and let me tell you, it was one heck of an upgrade from my Galaxy S before that. I have an upgrade soon an I think I’m going to upgrade to a Galaxy S3, sadly. I’m doing this because I really don’t like the approach that iOs 6 took. The “new” features that it delivered where not really useful. If you have an iPhone below the 4S, you really don’t look forward to this update. Anyways, what I’m trying to say is, if the iPhone 5S or 6 or whatever doesn’t come out with a newer OS or doesn’t deliver at least some of these requests, I will from there on be an android user.

About the author

Killian BellKillian Bell is a staff writer based in the U.K. He has an interest in all things tech and also covers Android over at CultofAndroid.com. You can follow him on Twitter via @killianbell.

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