Apple Confronts Samsung In Court About Internal Documents With Incriminating Titles

Apple Confronts Samsung In Court About Internal Documents With Incriminating Titles

Apple went after Samsung today in the most direct and perhaps damaging interchange, yet, using Samsung’s own internal documents to prove Apple’s claim that Samsung’s practices go beyond mere competition and are truly copyright infringement.

Apple called Justin Denison, Samsung’s chief strategy officer, to the stand today. Attorney for Apple Bill Lee, after some preliminary questioning, went right for the jugular, directly calling out Samsung, and asking Denison point blank if Samsung had copied Apple products. Denison denied the claim, and then Lee pulled out a set of internal documents from Samsung. Some of the titles of these reports were pretty incriminating.

“Beat Apple response”
“Lessons from Apple”
“Why you should care about Apple”
“Recent Apple analysis project”
“iPhone 5 counter strategy”

If that wasn’t enough, Lee then pulled out a document called “Relative evaluation report on S1, iPhone,” a document dated March 2, 2010, just before the first Galaxy S phone was released. The document apparently includes side-by-side photos of the iPhone’s interface next to the one for the device. The document even points out areas on the iPhone that Samsung was planning on improving, like changing the on-screen icons.

Denison apparently got to strike back a bit during cross examination, bringing up the fact that many smartphones have rounded corners and are rectangular in shape, a reference to the similarity of external design on most modern smartphones, and a point of contention in the Apple case. It’s as if he was trying to say that the similarities between the Galaxy S and the iPhone are only there as a matter of practicality. “If you drop it, it’s much more likely not to crack if it’s rounded,” he said.

The case continues on Monday with more testimony from Apple’s list of witnesses and experts.

  • lwdesign1

    I keep waiting for something tangible and significant to develop from the Apple/Samsung trial, but the titles from these emails just aren’t “incriminating” at all. It’s logical that Samsung would seek to compare the top selling smartphone of the day to what they’re developing. This kind of comparison and evaluation goes on all the time, and I’m assuming that Apple designers and technicians examined all kinds of different existing phones from other companies when they were developing the iPhone, so these email titles strike me as not even ho-hum.

    Don’t get me wrong, I think Samsung deserves to get its butt handed to it for all the intellectual property and R&D they’ve purloined in regards to their various smartphones and tablets. Same with Google. How incautious was Apple to have Eric Schmidt on its board of directors, where he conveniently listened to and saw all kinds of information on iOS and fed it to his programmers at Google in their revamp of Android.

    If you take a broad view of the computer industry, it’s a rather pathetic scene:

    1. Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs come up with the first practical and workable personal computer and start selling the Apple I and Apple II. Then IBM copies the Apple II idea and uses an operating system called DOS by Microsoft.

    2. Apple develops the Macintosh with its revolutionary Mac OS graphic user interface, mouse and on-screen clickable icons and folders. Then Microsoft copies it (badly) and comes out with Windows.

    3. Apple develops a series of new portable laptops and puts a trackball, then a trackpad in the lower part of the laptop, pushing the keyboard up toward the screen. Then all laptop manufacturers discover this is a brilliant idea and add trackballs, trackpads and button controllers (IBM/Lenovo) and push their keyboards up towards the screen.

    4. Apple develops the iPhone which revolutionizes the smartphone industry with its all-screen face with no physical keyboard. Then Samsung, HTC and just about every phone manufacturer copies the all-screen idea, most with OS’s that look nearly identical to iOS.

    5. Apple develops the iPad which revolutionizes the tablet industry, which had almost zero traction for over 10 years with products from other companies. Then Samsung, Acer and many others copy the entire look and feel of the iPad.

    You’d think that some other company could do a little bit of innovating on its own and not have to depend on Apple to do the R&D for the world. I’d love to be wowed by some other company’s products and have a choice of technologies. I stick with Apple not because of blind loyalty or fanboyishness. If there were better phones, OS’s and computers that gave me a better user experience that allowed me to enhance my life, I’d buy and use them. I like quality products that are well built, durable and work well. Until I see other companies doing a better job than Apple, I’ll stick with my Macs, iPhone, iPod and iPad.

  • Alfred2612

    You’d think that some other company could do a little bit of innovating on its own and not have to depend on Apple to do the R&D for the world. I’d love to be wowed by some other company’s products and have a choice of technologies.

    I think you’ve just written what is perhaps the best comment on CoM so far this year. :)

  • TylerMiller

    I keep waiting for something tangible and significant to develop from the Apple/Samsung trial, but the titles from these emails just aren’t “incriminating” at all. It’s logical that Samsung would seek to compare the top selling smartphone of the day to what they’re developing. This kind of comparison and evaluation goes on all the time, and I’m assuming that Apple designers and technicians examined all kinds of different existing phones from other companies when they were developing the iPhone, so these email titles strike me as not even ho-hum.

    Don’t get me wrong, I think Samsung deserves to get its butt handed to it for all the intellectual property and R&D they’ve purloined in regards to their various smartphones and tablets. Same with Google. How incautious was Apple to have Eric Schmidt on its board of directors, where he conveniently listened to and saw all kinds of information on iOS and fed it to his programmers at Google in their revamp of Android.

    If you take a broad view of the computer industry, it’s a rather pathetic scene:

    1. Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs come up with the first practical and workable personal computer and start selling the Apple I and Apple II. Then IBM copies the Apple II idea and uses an operating system called DOS by Microsoft.

    2. Apple develops the Macintosh with its revolutionary Mac OS graphic user interface, mouse and on-screen clickable icons and folders. Then Microsoft copies it (badly) and comes out with Windows.

    3. Apple develops a series of new portable laptops and puts a trackball, then a trackpad in the lower part of the laptop, pushing the keyboard up toward the screen. Then all laptop manufacturers discover this is a brilliant idea and add trackballs, trackpads and button controllers (IBM/Lenovo) and push their keyboards up towards the screen.

    4. Apple develops the iPhone which revolutionizes the smartphone industry with its all-screen face with no physical keyboard. Then Samsung, HTC and just about every phone manufacturer copies the all-screen idea, most with OS’s that look nearly identical to iOS.

    5. Apple develops the iPad which revolutionizes the tablet industry, which had almost zero traction for over 10 years with products from other companies. Then Samsung, Acer and many others copy the entire look and feel of the iPad.

    You’d think that some other company could do a little bit of innovating on its own and not have to depend on Apple to do the R&D for the world. I’d love to be wowed by some other company’s products and have a choice of technologies. I stick with Apple not because of blind loyalty or fanboyishness. If there were better phones, OS’s and computers that gave me a better user experience that allowed me to enhance my life, I’d buy and use them. I like quality products that are well built, durable and work well. Until I see other companies doing a better job than Apple, I’ll stick with my Macs, iPhone, iPod and iPad.

    Excellent write up!

  • robert_walter

    It is not only interesting what Apple has introduced (as summarised by lwdesign1), but what they have championed first-mover-wise (diskette, USB, Firewire, Thunderbolt, bluetooth), as well as what baggage they have dumped first-dumper-wise (CD/DVD, etc.)

    Each of these innovations has not come without significant investment to develop the new, and risk in the discarding of the older known.

  • technochick

    The titles aren’t the bad part. It’s the bits basically saying this is what Apple did. Do it. That’s the potentially incriminating stuff

About the author

Rob LeFebvreAnchorage, Alaska-based freelance writer and editor Rob LeFebvre has contributed to various tech, gaming and iOS sites, including 148Apps, Creative Screenwriting, Shelf-Awareness, VentureBeat, and Paste Magazine. Feel free to find Rob on Twitter @roblef, and send him a cookie once in a while; he'll really appreciate it.

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