Expert: Apple’s HDTV Will Have A Retina Display

Expert: Apple’s HDTV Will Have A Retina Display

But it won’t have any more pixels than your existing set.

Having been spoiled by Retina displays since the iPhone 4 was launched back in 2010, it’s slightly disappointing when Apple releases a new product that doesn’t have one these days. But there won’t be any disappointment with the upcoming Apple HDTV, according to one expert.

DisplayMate CEO Dr. Ray Soneira firmly believes that the Cupertino company’s much-anticipated set will feature a Retina display, just like all “premium” Apple products in the future. Not just because it’s incredible technology, but also because Apple wants to be consistent.

Apple won’t boast about its pixel density, Soneira says, but instead it will choose to focus on its color consistency and accuracy to match its existing lineup of iOS devices, all of which now have high-resolution Retina displays (apart from the iPad 2).

Why does Apple need to introduce its own Apple Television with an actual TV screen as opposed to just relying on an Apple TV streaming box connected to some other brand of TV? Because all existing TVs produce inaccurate and inconsistent colors and images that will be poor matches to Apple’s own iPhones and iPads. Photo sharing is especially important and convenient on WiFi and internet connected TVs.

Consumers will love the fact that everything including their personal photos, TV shows, movies, and videos will all look exactly the same on all Apple devices.

Soneira makes a very good point. After using an iPhone 4 for as little as a minute, you can never look at an iPhone 3GS display in the same way again. The same goes when you compare the new iPad to the iPad 2. Now that Apple has treated us to Retina displays, it’s difficult to enjoy regular displays.

And Apple will know as well as anybody that when we spend thousands on its new TV set, we don’t want to get it home and be disappointed because it looks no different to our old HD set, and disappointing when compared to our iPad.

That doesn’t mean, however, that the set will have significantly more pixels than an existing 1080p set. In fact, it will only boast the same resolution, as Soneira told CNET:

There is tremendous confusion (from consumers to Wall Street analysts) as to exactly what a “Retina Display” is in terms of resolution and Pixels Per Inch. Some analysts are saying that an Apple Retina Display Television is years away because the display technology won’t be ready for years. That is simply not true… Existing 1920×1080 HDTVs are already “Retina Displays” in terms of visual sharpness at typical viewing distances.

So, when Apple launches its own Apple Television it will almost certainly have a resolution of 1920×1080 and it will be a True Retina Display Television. The timing of an Apple Television will be up to Apple, but the display technology is already here.

So Apple’s new set may have the same resolution as your existing HDTV, but you can bet it will look a whole lot better.

Related
  • Carneylad

    I don’t really understand this. I though the definition of a “retina” display is one that you can’t discern an individual pixel at a ‘normal’ distance. I tend to sit quite far away from my 1080P TV and as a result, I can’t discern any individual pixels therefore, by definition, it’s already “retina” no? I don’t see the point in doubling the pixel density on the TV just to live up to hype as it won’t make any real difference to the experience – I think anyway. Surely it’ll be much cheaper if they leave it at 1080P.

  • stephenminton

    “So Apple’s new set may have the same resolution as your existing HDTV, but you can bet it will look a whole lot better.” In what way, though? that’s the big question….

    I agree with “Carneylad”, in that I definitely won’t be paying thousands for a TV set which only looks better if I sit up close to the screen. My TV is at the other end of the room, and I definitely can’t discern individual pixels (unless we’re talking about the so-called 1080p content on my Apple TV, which does look pixelated sometimes – but Blu Ray movies look as clear as crystal, no pixels in sight).

    It seems like Apple’s big opportunity around a TV is with the interface. If they do come out with an actual TV set, the selling point will be that it a) has the interface built-in, no hockey puck required; b) it will look beautiful in the living room; c) it will probably have some features not available on the hockey puck Apple TV, e.g. voice control or some such thing; d) the screen will have some kind of feature which nobody has even talked about yet, nothing to do with resolution but something else entirely which all TV manufacturers will promptly copy (especially Samsung); e) the audio quality will probably be better than other LED TVs (not hard, as most TVs are terrible with audio quality until you add your own home cinema set-up; and f) it will be another Apple thing for Apple fans to own. They might even put a built-in blu-ray drive in there too, as an outlier (adding to the selling point that ‘all you need is the screen’ – I think that ‘simplicity’ angle will be something they play on; but, of course they want us to buy our movies on iTunes, not Blu Ray).

    Anyway, it will be out of my price range, I’m sure. I hope they continue to support the good old hockey puck!

  • Michael Edward Vargas

    its a nice idea tho but look at the new retina macbook pro it almost is a grand just for the so called retina image applying that to a 50+ inch tv ur talking alot of money here i dont think any one but rich hard core apple fans will buy it. it will end up like there lil high end boom box looks good sounds good but is too much for somthing we already have the only way apple can enter this market is if they undercut everyone with prices and give them somthing that is unlike anything out there

  • joewaylo

    I wonder if they will be able to remove the pixelation in 1080p. Watching heavily pixeled clouds pass across the 16:9 1080p screen on a Vizio 35 inch is annoying.

  • mr_bee

    I don’t really understand this. I though the definition of a “retina” display is …

    You say you don’t understand it, then you come out with the exact same conclusion that the article does. WTF?
    You make no sense.

  • Matthew Gonzales Landry

    .

    I don’t really understand this. I though the definition of a “retina” display is one that you can’t discern an individual pixel at a ‘normal’ distance. I tend to sit quite far away from my 1080P TV and as a result, I can’t discern any individual pixels therefore, by definition, it’s already “retina” no? I don’t see the point in doubling the pixel density on the TV just to live up to hype as it won’t make any real difference to the experience – I think anyway. Surely it’ll be much cheaper if they leave it at 1080P.

    Did you not read what the article was saying? It was saying that current 1080p TVs already live to the retina name in terms of resolution, so the only differ coating factor would be that the color reproduction would be superior on the Apple TV set.

  • Matthew Gonzales Landry

    I think this is good. Tacking on the Retina brand will generate interest in the product. The fact that it will look better than most displays for color reproduction is cool. I can’t wait.

  • SpamStream

    Possibly the most useless and content-free article I’ve ever encountered

  • Pmania

    I have to point out that currently Apple’s devices don’t share the same screens, unfortunately. When I take a photo with my iPhone 4S it looks amazing, but when I transfer it to my iPad 3 the colours are very different, it doesn’t look bad, just different and I really don’t like that. And why would anyone want a retina display on a TV that you watch from at least 2 meters away?

About the author

Killian BellKillian Bell is a staff writer based in the U.K. He has an interest in all things tech and also covers Android over at CultofAndroid.com. You can follow him on Twitter via @killianbell.

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