Kindle Fire And Android Tablet Sales Have Collapsed In Wake Of New iPad

Kindle Fire And Android Tablet Sales Have Collapsed In Wake Of New iPad

Despite holiday gains, Apple retakes tablet market share from Amazon and Android.

While Apple saw strong sales for all its iOS devices during its post-holiday quarter, Android tablet sales slumped, giving up any gains that Android had seen as a tablet platform during the holiday shopping season.

According to IDC, overall tablet shipments were down more than the analyst firm had expected. The decline to 17.4 million units represented a 38.4% drop off from the holiday quarter shipments of 28.2 million units – a notably steeper decline than IDC’s predicted 34% decline.

While overall tablet shipments were down, Android tablets slumped significantly more than Apple’s iPad, which gained an additional 13.3% of the tablet market.

iPad shipments dropped to 11.8 million compared to Apple’s record holiday quarter, during which Apple shipped 15.4 million iPads. However, the iPad share of the overall tablet market grew significantly, to 68% of the global market from a low of 54.7% the previous quarter.

After a strong launch, Amazon’s Kindle Fire lost significant marketshare, going from 16.8% of the market on shipment of 4.8 million units during the holiday quarter to just over 4%. Samsung tablets stole second place from Amazon, which dropped to third place and was trailed by Lenovo and the Barnes & Noble Nook at fourth and fifth in overall market shipments.

“Apple reasserted its dominance in the market this quarter, driving huge shipment totals at a time when all but a few Android vendors saw their numbers drop precipitously after posting big gains during the holiday buying season,” said Tom Mainelli, research director, Mobile Connected Devices at IDC. “Apple’s move to position the iPad as an all-purpose tablet, instead of just a content consumption device, is resonating with consumers as well as educational and commercial buyers. And its decision to keep a lower-priced iPad 2 in the market after it launched the new iPad in March seems to be paying off as well.”

Still, the research firm sees Android as down but not out of the tablet game.

“It seems some of the mainstream Android vendors are finally beginning to grasp a fact that Amazon, B&N, and Pandigital figured out early on: Namely, to compete in the media tablet market with Apple, they must offer their products at notably lower price points,” Mainelli added. “We expect a new, larger-screened device from Amazon at a typically aggressive price point, and Google will enter the market with an inexpensive, co-branded ASUS tablet designed to compete directly on price with Amazon’s Kindle Fire. The search giant’s new tablet will run a pure version of Android, whereas the Fire runs Amazon’s own forked version of the OS that cuts Google out of the picture.”

Related
  • ApplePr0n

    Go figure. Apple has a straglehold on the tablet market. I mean they had the 2 best tablets on the market, and then they added fhe new iPad. So now they have the 3 best

  • hmlc

    “Namely, to compete in the media tablet market with Apple, they must offer their products at notably lower price points.”


    If you say so. One should note that the Fire’s agressive $199 price point and hardware subsidies didn’t allow it to maintain momentum after the holiday season ended. 

    “IDC also expects the segment to rebound quickly as other vendors introduce new products in the second quarter and beyond.”

    Samsung and other Android-based manufacturers continue to be hobbled by the lack of the rich book, app, and media ecosystem that surounds Apple’s iPad and Amazon’s Kindle Fire. Google newly rebranded “Google Play” may help, but would still require device makers to compete according to Google’s rulebook. 

    See http://www.iSights.org/2012/05/android-tablets-drop-the-ball-during-2012s-first-quarter.html

About the author

Ryan FaasRyan Faas is a technology journalist and consultant living in upstate New York who has written extensively about Apple, business and enterprise IT, and the mobile industry. In addition to writing for Cult of Mac, he is a contributor to Computerworld, InformIT, and Peachpit Press. In a previous existence he was a healthcare IT director as well as a systems and network administrator. Follow Ryan on Twitter and Google +

(sorry, you need Javascript to see this e-mail address)| Read more posts by .

Posted in News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |