Apple’s Next-Gen iTV Will Come With A6 Chip In Sizes Between 32- And 55-Inches [Report]

Apple’s Next-Gen iTV Will Come With A6 Chip In Sizes Between 32- And 55-Inches [Report]

Ever since Jobs enigmatically said in his bio that he had “cracked” the television problem, people have been going nuts speculating… and Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster has gone so far as to say that the iTV will cost twice as much as a regular television set, and come in three different sizes.

Well, looks like Munster’s forecast has some corroborating evidence. A new report not only says that Apple’s iTV will come in three different sizes, but that it will also pack Apple’s next-gen A6 CPU.

The story comes from the sometimes correct Smarthouse, who report:

Sources at a major Japanese company who are involved in manufacturing the TV believe that the 55’ model will compete with new Smart TVs from Samsung and LG that will have new processors built in while offering a combination of OLED display, as well as new Super HD TV technology from LG.

Okay, let’s say all of this is true. Even Apple can’t expect people to pay twice as much for an A6-powered, Siri-equipped iTV as any other smart TV on the market. So if this is all for real, what else does Apple have to offer, and why can’t they just slap it into a set-top box? Kinect-like motion detection? What is going to justify the price, and how will Apple keep people upgrading their sets? All important questions.

Related
  • djrobsd

    Huge Apple fail.  Move on Apple, your a computing company not a television company.  If you REALLY want to make money, why not just license your AppleTV technology to Samsung, Sony, and LG and have them build it into their TVS rather then trying to re-invent the wheel.

  • Paul Lloyd Johnson

    It’s the next gen AppleTV. THERE IS NO ITV PRODUCT LINE AND NEVER WILL BE!

  • djrobsd

    Oh and by the way Apple, you didn’t invent the AppleTV.  DivX and several other companies had set top boxes before you did.  

  • Paul Lloyd Johnson

    Actually they did. I think you meant to say, you didn’t invent the set top box?

  • FriarNurgle

    Your request for Apple credit has been denied.  

  • turbohand

    Because that is not their operating model. Why in the world would apple source out their technology into hardware they don’t control. It makes no sense.

  • Tron Caldwell

    They didn’t make phones, mp3 players, or sell movies at first either….Doesn’t mean there’s no room for them to expand into different markets, if Apple just sold computers they wouldn’t be as profitable and popular as they are today 

  • Shameer Mulji

    Didn’t you get the memo? Everything these days is potentially a computer.

  • Steve LeVine

    That’s what Apple does (and excels at)- Reinventing. They reinvented personal computing, the music industry, the entertainment industry and the mobile phone. They are  no longer a computing company, which is why they dropped Computers from their name. They stay away from licensing which is why you haven’t seen Blu-Ray in a Mac. They have become a company that puts out superior consumer products that drive consumer demand. IF they are building “Televisions” then they will not be reinventing the wheel. They’ll be throwing away the wheel in favor of a jet pack. It’s what they do.

  • Will99

    This comment is so dumb.  When has Apple EVER licensed it’s tech to another company to make an Apple product.  Apple wasn’t a phone company or an mp3 company either so they should’nt have made the iPhone or iPod too? 

  • BuckyThreadkiller

    Microsoft’s new Xbox announcement might be the killer app for TV if Apple keeps delaying this product. Voice and gesture recognition via Kinect — If that is where Apple was headed, they may be a day late and a dollar short. MS usually screws up this kind of thing — but they have a huge installed base in Xbox. 

  • Tim Meesseman

    You say that like Steve Jobs himself didn’t say there would be one.

  • Jordan Clay

    I’m a big Apple follower,  I buy almost all of their products.  But there is absolutely NO WAY I could justify spending $2000 on a TV vs. the average of $1,000 for an average top of the line 40″ TV.   Steve Jobs said he wanted an integrated experience.  If i Could use one remote to turn it on and then pick up my apple remote to adjust the channel or sound I would gladly do that.  It isn’t worth the extra $1000 hit to my wallet to buy an APPLE TV. 

    one of two things is wrong here.  Either the TV won’t be double the price, or it will be a set top box.   Apple has been gaining market share based on one simple thing. Apple has been the cost leader of the high end market.   I think a lot of people are forgetting that.

  • David Butt

    I believe these commentators are focussing far too narrowly on Jobs’ statement. The challenges with the current television market include many issues that will not be solved by ‘Siri for TV’ or gesture based interaction. To have “cracked it” will mean addressing not only the issue of multiple remotes, but also many proprietary delivery methods and a variety of types of input. As the multiple remote issue has been addressed by Logitech & others, thus removing one problem, I sincerely believe that Jobs’ ideas go far beyond what we have imagined. For the most part, our network suppliers are not ready for streaming delivery of content over the ‘net. What there is already is limited in coverage, and not yet ready for moving the huge amounts of data streaming would require.

    I, like others, anticipate the revealing of this new technology.

  • Vincent

    This is quite interesting to me.  One thing I despair of in all modern TV’s is the COMPLEXITY of them.  All the connections, and the remotes!  There’s the cable box, at least a TV, and maybe DVR.  And Logitech has not “solved” this problem as another user posits, they came up with a WORKAROUND line of products.  They are still clunky and you always have the problem of is my device fuily modelled, or am I still going to have to find the original remote for some less-used function.   I’m actually very pleased lately with my Panasonic DMP-BDT210 Blu-Ray player, for being fully network controllable.  Either wired or via 802.11n (5 GHz also!!!) so I can control it via my choice of apps on a smartphone or tablet.  Either way right now, if you have like I do parents that are healthy but over 70 years old, you may find as I did that, that getting them a new TV can really be a struggle to arrive at a simple and understandable solution.

  • David_Lazarus

    Same here. I actually think a more capable box for $100 would make sense. That is a price level that can mean that they can make a profit on each. I cannot see how they can make the same margins on a TV. 

  • Sarah976k

    @readers:disqus my roomate’s mother made $186249 so far just working on the computer for a few hours. Read about it and Learn her ways checking “Online income solutions” here
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    http://uang.in/Cash

  • Timothy Weaver

    Apple is now an innovative consumer electronics company that scores huge margins because of its innovation around the supply chain. Without charging a price premium, they still dominate the segments they enter – either through margins or both volumes and margins. Rest assured, if Apple enters the TV market they will only do it if their entrance meets those criteria. You won’t see an Apple television that has a significant price premium for comparable products.

  • Timothy Weaver

    Except MS doesn’t have usable voice recognition, at least when compared to Siri. http://www.techau.tv/blog/micr…. Sure, MS has a bigger presence right now in the living room but that can change easily. It’s not like Apple hasn’t done it to companies (including MS) in other categories.

  • CharliK

    The point is that Apple can’t use the term iTV because it is trademarked by another company. Something an analyst with half a clue would know.

  • CharliK

    The point is that Apple can’t use the term iTV because it is trademarked by another company. Something an analyst with half a clue would know.

  • howard smith

    Thats the same thing people said when they entered the music, phone and table markets. Who is laughing to the bank now. 

  • Mike Rathjen

    Where do I get an Apple table?

  • Commonman

    I guess the trick is to figure out what we don’t even know what we want yet and see what Steve meant. I love the ale-carte model on my current Apple TV device which allows me to watch only what I want and control the entire system from my iPad or iPhone with finger gestures. And with iTunes already screening some not yet released and currently in theater films, my only hope is to “lose all the wires” and expand the release of current motion pictures. It’s quite funny to see people on iTune complain about paying $9.00 or $15.00 to rent a film that hasn’t been released yet but will pay up to $30-$40 + popcorn, candy and drinks to take the family to a theater chain to see the same film. I’m sure whatever the model is, it will be very different, people will complain then all the other companies will copy.

  • Charlie_Magnus

    For the conspiracy-minded of the apple flavour, I would like to point out that the Apple web site has had a background image sort of hinting at television for quite a few months now, still to see at the iTunes page. If I remember things correctly it was introduced at the same time as the iTunes store started to sell Beatles, a year ago.

    Interestingly, it has rather recently disappeared from the main page, where the background is once again all-white.

    Of course this can mean only one thing, wouldn’t you say?

  • Charlie_Magnus

    IF Apple has got something up their sleeve, their timing might be as perfect as can be. Credit Suisse (the bank) has recently made an analysis where they question if TV (at least in its current form) will still be around in five years from now.

    For the article, see:
    http://adage.com/article/media

  • SerranoSlim

    To have ‘the simplest interface you can imagine’ will require doing several things:
    1. Eliminate different physical connections for sources, to eliminate cables and devices. To Jobs’ POV, having an additional box to eliminate other boxes might seem to go against the very notion of simplicity. Hence the TV rather than the separate box. Use Ethernet, wired or wireless, as the only connection and use a bi-directional command protocol. This would allow having only a power cable connected to the TV. Or you just connect your cable modem to the TV via Ethernet, which can also also serve as a wireless router for your home. Having the router built into the TV eliminates the need for a Mac or PC to set it up. Apple or third parties can provide compatible networked disc players, jukeboxes, projectors, etc.
    2. Eliminate differences in distribution (ppv, Netflix, on-demand, etc) to have simple choices. Have one list of viewing options for all in-progress and past shows, and allow viewing any show without having to pre-record it. This eliminates the need for ‘season pass’ and other kinds of user-scheduled recordings. If you can watch it, or could have, then you can go to it in the list and start watching it. Likewise any movie that’s available. This also eliminates the TV Guide as a map to find shows scattered across different distribution channels and times, usually as a spreadsheet with hundreds of rows and columns. Potentially your choices are in an easy-to-use menu with pages for Sports, Movies, TV Shows, Web Videos. The iTV may have a cable tuner that can create streams of in-progress shows. Future viewing options can be in Coming Soon pages, so you can find what will be added to the library and when to expect it. No need to record them, as they’ll be available by stream. Just find what’s coming soon of interest, and perhaps set a reminder.
    3. Eliminate the remotes for all other devices – the Apple remote would not have to be programmable because it only has to control the TV, which controls everything else that can interface to it. Provide apps for iOS, Mac OS, and Windows to control the TV as well. And if possible, have Siri control on the iTV as well.
    4. From there, Apple can add features like Facetime, VoIP, and Watch With Friends (two or more homes with iTVs can watch the same show and be in sync with each other as well as being able to talk to one another). The iTV can serve as the Home Sharing server for your iTunes library.
    5. You can be sure that there won’t be third-party apps for the iTV, since they would break the unified presentation, but there might be a possibility to create a stream from an app running on a connected device. And of course, there will be support for Airplay so you can display apps running on an iPhone or iPad.

  • Demonstr8r

    iPhone was trademarked by Cisco before Apple released a smartphone by the same name. However, I don’t think Apple will ever release an HDTV set.

  • John Marshall

    I guess you forgot about this disaster:

    http://www.engadget.com/2005/0

  • Paul Lloyd Johnson

    ITV is a major British TV network. As big as the BBC and they have been broadcasting for over 50 years. The reason AppleTV isn’t already called iTV is because of this. Nothing has changed.

  • CharliK

    Cisco had a trademark in the 23.5 hour of their last renewal grace period with no viable product. Which means they were about to lose the trademark. Then they heard that Apple intended to buy it and suddenly announced a new model. 

    It went to court and the Judge saw right through it and told them that they had to share the ‘mark with Apple. But the moment they stopped making their iPhone or failed to release the one they said would be out ‘in the Fall’ it was all Apple’s. 

    Vastly different than the iTV network issue where there was a fully licensed and 100% in use ‘mark. 

  • CharliK

    Apple tried the licensing thing once and it was a total fail that nearly killed the company. Which is why one of the first things Steve did was kill that whole program. 

    And remember this is just a rumor. A rather detailed flight of fancy pulled out of some analysts wet dream (or his butt). There could be a grain of truth to it or it could be just a big turd and the little black box is all we are getting. 

    So how about you wait until Apple actually announces something before you start yelling huge fail. 

  • Brandon Dillon

    I’ve thought of a lot of these points myself, but you’ve really incorporated other features that I would have never thought of. The point in #1 about essentially using the iTV as a router is brilliant.

    #2 sounds good, but I think it would require some form of cooperation from those companies. That’s going to be the main issue here. The iTV has to function as a compatible cable box for whatever service provider that is connected.

    #4 was something similar to something that I had thought of as far as Watch With Friends. It would be nice if you could watch in-sync not just on LAN, but with anyone. Perhaps logging into the iTV with your Apple TV and sending an invite, similar to Game Center? FaceTime with an iTV would be fantastic as well.

    Their competitors think it’s hard to compete with the iPad? Try competing with the iTV, if it’s what we’ve just described. The best part is that none of what we described is anything unreasonable. It’s all features that exist in individual Apple devices.

    Apple got its foot in the door with consumers by changing how we consume media. The process for buying/renting music/movies/books/apps could not be any more convenient, which by the way turned me from pirating. The iTV would not only complete the ecosystem for media consumption, it would be THE complete media hub of a household.

  • Brandon Dillon

    I’ve thought of a lot of these points myself, but you’ve really incorporated other features that I would have never thought of. The point in #1 about essentially using the iTV as a router is brilliant.

    #2 sounds good, but I think it would require some form of cooperation from those companies. That’s going to be the main issue here. The iTV has to function as a compatible cable box for whatever service provider that is connected.

    #4 was something similar to something that I had thought of as far as Watch With Friends. It would be nice if you could watch in-sync not just on LAN, but with anyone. Perhaps logging into the iTV with your Apple TV and sending an invite, similar to Game Center? FaceTime with an iTV would be fantastic as well.

    Their competitors think it’s hard to compete with the iPad? Try competing with the iTV, if it’s what we’ve just described. The best part is that none of what we described is anything unreasonable. It’s all features that exist in individual Apple devices.

    Apple got its foot in the door with consumers by changing how we consume media. The process for buying/renting music/movies/books/apps could not be any more convenient, which by the way turned me from pirating. The iTV would not only complete the ecosystem for media consumption, it would be THE complete media hub of a household.

  • Brandon Dillon

    This goes far beyond narrowing down the controls to one remote. This is how we consume/discover shows. Plus, when has Apple ever made a device that didn’t interact in a dramatic way with its other products? This isn’t just a TV. This is a complete hub for Apple products, which if you are a true Apple fan, you want to stay in their ecosystem of products. This isn’t just a simplified TV.

    Also, people may be forgetting that Apple owns several patents for wireless charging/power. How could they ever bring that into the home? They sure wouldn’t make a stand-alone product JUST for that. People wouldn’t buy it. BUT they could implement it into other devices such as an iMac, but people are drifting away from desktops, so that leaves MacBooks. There isn’t enough room in them for the technology, and even if there was, they aren’t always plugged in, and it would drain the power. What does that leave? The iTV. Something that doesn’t move, that is in (probably) the center of the household, that is always plugged in.

    This is how I envision the iTV; as the centerpiece of the Apple product ecosystem, the hub.

  • Luckiest_Girl_1990

    @David_Lazarus:disqus …..I ??n`t b?l?iv?…?y fri?nd`s sist?r m???s 78/hr ?n th? int?rn?t. Sh? h?s b??n un?m?l???d f?r 11 m?nths but l?st m?nth h?r inc?m? w?s 7985$ ?ust w?r?ing ?n th? ?? f?r ? f?w h?urs. Read on this w?bsit?…….http://alturl.com/7dv24

  • Luckiest_Girl_1990

    …..I ??n`t b?l?iv?…?y fri?nd`s sist?r m???s 78/hr ?n th? int?rn?t.  Sh? h?s b??n un?m?l???d f?r 11 m?nths but l?st m?nth h?r inc?m? w?s  7985$ ?ust w?r?ing ?n th? ?? f?r ? f?w h?urs.  Read on this w?bsit?…….    C a s h M a n y . c ? m  

  • Cincotta_e

    All that sounds cool, but I wouldn’t pay over $700 for one. 

  • Brandon Dillon

    The 27″ Cinema Display is $999…….. 

About the author

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his wife and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

(sorry, you need Javascript to see this e-mail address)| Read more posts by .

Posted in News, Top stories | Tagged: , , , |