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Let Cooler Heads Prevail: Do You Need AppleCare+? [Opinion]

Let Cooler Heads Prevail: Do You Need AppleCare+? [Opinion]

A good friend of mine recently bought a new iPhone 4S from her local Apple Store. When presented with her new iPhone, the Apple Store salesperson tried to sell her on AppleCare+. It was a hard sell; in her opinion, the Apple Store salesperson went about it in all of the wrong ways. She’s a savvy consumer, reads Cult of Mac and other tech blogs, and has even read my new book. She did her own research before she bought the iPhone. She understood the differences between AppleCare and AppleCare+. She weighed risks of accidental damage against the price and limitations of AppleCare+, and decided the extra protection wasn’t for her.

She passed on AppleCare+, but believes that she might have been swayed if she hadn’t done her homework. She made a choice and, whether or not it turns out to be the right one, she was the one to make it. But not everyone is going to take the time to evaluate the pros and cons of AppleCare+ and will be confronted with this question at the time of purchase. Might you or someone you know fall victim to a hard sell on AppleCare+?

AppleCare+’s primary feature is that it offers limited protection against accidental damage. For obvious reasons, it must be purchased at the same time as the iPhone (though Apple had made a few exceptions to this requirement for some purchasers). There are limitations, such as the $49 service fee and the “up to” two incident limitation. For some, this may be a good deal. The fact AppleCare+ is being offered by Apple means that an established company with a great track record is backing the program. This doesn’t mean, however, that AppleCare+ is a good buy for everyone.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying AppleCare+ or other service contracts are a scam, but these plans are a waste of money if you never need to use them. For some people, AppleCare+ or other protection plans might make sense. For example, protection may be justified if you’re unusually accident-prone or plan on using your iPhone in a high-risk area. The peace of mind one gets from knowing their iPhone has extra protection does have some value to it. However, your iPhone’s One-Year Limited Warranty or AppleCare already provide adequate protection (i.e. protection from defects) from most things that will ever go wrong. If you do decide to purchase one of these plans, you should do so only after taking the time to understand what you’re actually purchasing.

I think it’s safe to say most people don’t spend hours upon hours pouring over product specifications or reviews when considering a purchase. Moreover, I doubt most people take more than a few moments to evaluate their specific needs while contemplating a new luxury acquisition like an iPhone. I think most people don’t understand AppleCare’s policies and procedures and probably couldn’t articulate precisely how AppleCare+ differs from AppleCare (of course many Cult of Mac readers may be exceptions to this, but what about their friends and family?). Look, we all love our iPhones and shudder to think about the cost of replacing them, but that doesn’t mean we should make our buying decisions higgledy-piggledy.

Let’s have a look at the exchange that allegedly took place. I admit, I was not there, and although I have spoken with my friend about it extensively, this is all hearsay. I’ve made reasonable efforts to ensure this conversation is being portrayed accurately. I think it may serve as an example of the types of things someone might say to you in order to convince you to buy AppleCare+ and, therefore, readers may benefit from the exchange in hopes it will help them understand how someone might try to effectuate a hard sell.

Representative: Do you know about AppleCare+?

iPhone 4S Buyer: Yes, I think I’ll pass on it.

Representative: Are you sure you understand it?

iPhone 4S Buyer: Yes, it’s for accidental damage. I don’t think I need it. If I break it, I’ll buy a new one. I’ve owned expensive phones in the past and I have always taken good care of them. Plus I bought a good case for it, so I think I’m protected.

Representative: But what happens if it breaks all by itself?

iPhone 4S Buyer: Like if it’s not my fault that it breaks or it’s defective?

Representative: Yes.

iPhone 4S Buyer: Then I’ll bring it in and have Apple fix it. I don’t see how I need AppleCare+ to fix a defect.

Representative: Well, that’s only in the first year. If it breaks in its second year then you’re out of luck.

iPhone 4S Buyer: No, that’s what AppleCare is for, which I can buy anytime during the first year. If I buy AppleCare and something breaks in the second year then I’ll bring it in and have Apple fix it.

Representative: You’ve been really careful with your past iPhones?

iPhone 4S Buyer: This is my first iPhone.

Representative: (in apparent disbelief) So, this is your first iPhone and you’re not going to buy AppleCare+? Do you think that’s a good idea?

iPhone 4S Buyer: I’ve owned expensive phones in the past and I haven’t broken them. I think I’ll be just fine without it. Thank you though.

A simple “no thanks” wasn’t enough. When I hear stories like this, I immediately think of the not-so-hypothetical situation where an average consumer – like my parents or, perhaps, your parents – find themselves in a situation where they are being openly interrogated about their reasons for not wanting to buy something. How likely is it that some salesperson – one who is incentivized to improve his or her “attachment rate” by pushing extras such as AppleCare+ – will convince them to buy something they don’t need?

The above exchange illustrates what a hard sell on AppleCare+ might look like. The representative didn’t mention the limitations of the plan (i.e. $49 service fee, two-replacement limit). The representative was persistent and tried to harp on the customer’s fear of the unexpected and inexperience owning an iPhone. The representative even overtly suggested the customer buy AppleCare+ in order to protect against defects. This is simply not correct and is the type of statement that misleads average people. Your iPhone’s One-Year Limited Warranty already protects you against defects. If you want defect protection to last longer, you may purchase standard AppleCare anytime before your iPhone’s warranty expires. If your iPhone spontaneously breaks, it’s going to be due to a defect, which should be covered.

What’s the lesson here? Let cooler heads prevail. Research AppleCare+ and evaluate your needs before you purchase an iPhone, because there’s a good chance someone is going to try to sell you on AppleCare+.

Related
  • Notaspadesprov

    same thing happened to me with a recent ipad2 purchased. the sales rep seemed SHOCKED i would even consider not getting wxtra applecare protection. i think its clear apple emploees are being told to push the apple care “product”‘ and they may be getting incentives/bonuses for how many they sell. i hate the aggressive nature of these marked up insurance policies. if they must guilt consumers into buying something they jad no intentions on buying, then just hand them a brochure and back off. shame on apple for this predatory pactice

  • Notaspadesprov

    and its clear apple is pushing these apple care products more now than ever as older generations are catching on to iphones , ipods and ipads… older generations tend to be more conservative and buy into the “warranty” concept… and they are likely being overly influenced into buying extra protection when clearly its not needed

  • Tennouhai

    I call BS on the ‘hard sell’. Yea, they probably mentioned it to you, as most customers probably haven’t heard of it before and it’s a nice service. I’ve never been ‘hard sold’ anything in Apple Stores – that goes for One to One, AppleCare, or the new AppleCare+.

  • Yossi Joseph Keshet

    Sorry but according to Apple website they sell only AppleCare+ for iPhone and not just AppleCare. Look here: http://store.apple.com/us/brow

  • Jkeshet

    According to Apple website they are selling only AppleCare+ for iPhone and not just AppleCare. Look here: http://store.apple.com/us/brow

  • Andrew

    If you’re going to write about Apple products and services, please do your research. There is no more regular AppleCare. It’s gone. It’s just Applecar+, which you can only buy at time of purchase. So in this scenario, the salesperson was absolutely correct in saying that if there was a defect after the first year, it would not be covered. AppleCare+ is exactly what regular AppleCare used to be with the added accidental damage part

  • jr

    For $20 more than regular Apple Care its not a bad deal.  Most people I know who have damaged phones were from accidents ie dropping in water, on the ground, etc.  Also compared to the third party insurance company Square Trade, which charges the same amount ($100) but rather than cap 2 accidental damage replacements the cost of each repair or replacement gets deducted from the value of the phone.  So I’d say its a competitively priced insurance plan.

  • Tara

    It’s true that they must be pushing the AppleCare more.  When I bought my 27″iMac in May, the guy didn’t seem to care if I bought the 21.5″ or the 27″ with a price difference of almost 1K.  However, I got the hardest press ever to buy AppleCare and it kind of shocked me.  I do like that you have up to a year to buy it and I said I would consider it, but not then.  He hampered on for quite a bit more before letting me go. 

  • Lake Elkhorn Park User

    Yeah, this article is wrong, there is no regular AppleCare option for new purchases, just AppleCare+.  Also, this misrepresents the selling relationship.  A lot of people didn’t get asked about if they wanted AppleCare+ at all at time of sale, which is why they extended the ability to sign up later for 30 days.  I didn’t see anyone pressuring folks to purchase it, even when people probably should have signed up immediately.   This person who has not had an iphone previously just has no idea all the services and support provided by Apple and is needlessly exposing herself to an expensive replacement and/or repair headache at 3rd party cheapo repairplace.

  • Tennouhai

    That’s because it’s stupid to buy a Mac without it. You’re gonna buy it anyway, so just get it all out the way in one transaction.

  • Tara

    It’s no more “stupid” to buy a Mac without it, then it would be an iPhone.  I have 6 friends who have Mac computers, none of which bought AppleCare.  None of which have had to seek help from Apple so far.  Now, am I aware things can break?  Of course.  But it is my decision to buy or not buy it.  I have bought insurance on TV’s in the past and other high priced items over the years and I NEVER used any of those plans.  Money out the window.   

    Moreover, I had PC’s for 17 years and not ONCE did any of them ever break.  If things screwed up, I fixed them myself or got help from friends.  I have a friend who fixes Apple products too.  So don’t say it’s “stupid” because perhaps I have alternatives.  As I said to the seller at the store – in 17 years I never had to have anyone look at my PC’s – so I HAVE to have insurance to have someone to fix my Mac when it breaks down which means would make it worse than a PC?  It’s a personal choice.  I know the options and I will take that risk.  I can afford to – so it’s not stupid to forgo it.

  • Wayne_Luke

    In retail, there is a strong emphasis on upselling and pushing extra services. This comes from the top and exists in all retail channels. Often times, the employee may receive a bonus based on how often they upsell certain add-on products. Sometimes they may lose their jobs if they don’t upsell enough. I wouldn’t blame the retail clerk in this case, they are just working on orders from their management to improve sales. Even an industry leading retailer like Apple faces tremendous pressure to increase same store sales year after year.

  • FriarNurgle

    Meh on Apple care. 
    Apple has has an impressive track record of fixing/replacing things for free. I personally witnessed multiple people walk into the Apple Store with a broken/cracked iPhone out of wty and walk out with a new (refurb) iPhone. My buddy also recently took in his 3 year old MacBook that had intermittent issues with not booting up. They replaced the entire top case, keybord and all, since it had a little crack on the palm rests and that’s a known issue. They did this all for free without even blinking an eye. 
    I’m sure there are stories of people not receiving free replacements or repairs, but the cost of Apple care, the deductible, and the fact Apple is generally good about keeping you happy I’ll take my chances. 

  • androo79

    This is my third iPhone and I was grilled. Sales rep asked me to explain to him the difference and I told him you had to buy it with the phone and it covers accidental damage. In my case he accepted it at that point. My son was also bored and acting crazy to that helped.

  • androo79

    See my other comment. I wouldn’t call it a hard sale but definitely harder that I have ever experienced at apple retail, and I have been there a lot.

  • francine.

    As an employee, there is no incentive to sell it. there is no bonus. And it’s not shame on apple, but shame on the (few) employees who try to push it.

  • francine.

    exactly. its YOUR choice to get it or not. but hold yourself accountable for that decision. i just love when people don’t get it, and get pisssssssssssssssssssed off at us because we won’t fix it for free. 

  • BMWTwisty

    There’s always the Applecare alternative:

    squaretrade dot com/pages/iphone-landing24 for $99

    fwiw

  • Afs_nj

    “but these plans are a waste of money if you never need to use them”

    Did you really post that?

    Anyway, $49 avoids paying full price for a replacement phone–no more forgiveness program. Get it?

  • Bruce Miller

    I just bough iPhones for my kids. This is their first iPhone. I jumped at the chance to purchase Applecare+ because I foresee hearing these words at least once in the next two years: “OMG I just dropped my phone in the toilet.” This is a $640 computer. Why gamble that the kindly folks at the Apple store will forgive the inevitable clumsiness that befalls us all?    

  • Ryan Warner

    I don’t like this article. You’re basically telling the majority of people to buy AppleCare. After working at the equivalent of the Genius Bar at an Apple Specialist for 2 years, I wholeheartedly recommend AppleCare to EVERYONE. I buy it on every Apple device I get: iPod, iPhone, and computer (currently own an iPod touch, 2 iPhone 4s, and 2 13″ MacBook Pros, all with AppleCare). For the record, I don’t work there anymore and haven’t for 1 1/2 years.

    A single repair that you have to pay for out of warranty will more than 80% of the time cost more than AppleCare does for our device. And it increases resale value (as well as making it easier to resell).

    For those less tech savvy, it includes phone tech support.

    AppleCare+ sweetens the deal with accidental damage coverage. No need for a separate insurance.

    Apple’s repair work is always quick and easy. Even if you find another cheaper warranty/insurance service, they are never as easy to file a claim with and it takes weeks to get your device back. Seen it first hand. And AppleCare usually covers more and earlier.

    BUT…

    2 things I tell people to do about AppleCare. 1) Try not to wait. Yes, you have some time to buy it, but I have seen SOOO many people say they were going to get it but just forgot or didn’t keep track of their original purchase date.

    2) (and this is the kicker) Don’t buy it at full price. You can ALWAYS get it online through other retailers for cheap (make sure to get one in a sealed box, not just a code!). I paid $120 for one of my MBP and $170 for the other. Those keeping track, retail is $250 and student discount is $180+. iPhones? $55 and less (retail is $70).

    My only concern with AppleCare+ is it looks like thus far you HAVE TO buy from Apple and nowhere else. So no discount. Buying at full price is what you do for convenience and it’s like a, “Well, I know I want and need this and if I have to get it at this price then okay, but…” Not as good of a deal, but still worth it.

    I’m actually hoping they come out with this for computers and roll out an upgrade plan so those currently under AppleCare coverage can get up to AppleCare+.

  • Jdsonice

    I completely free with you. Not buying applecare+ is not an option.

  • Ryan Warner

    Oh, and I forgot. The people saying, “Apple will fix stuff out of warranty for free” are very very very very much the exception to the rule. This new AppleCare+ program is supposed to give everyone that kind of coverage at a reasonable price and crack down on the freebies. Only time will tell if that gets enforced, though.

    But PLEASE don’t take the risk. It’s way too expensive if you lose your gamble. Comes as part of the buying a premium (quality and price) product.

  • Jdsonice

    I always buy it. It is worth the price, and as someone mentioned below, buy it from a third party retailer and get it cheaper. But get it – totally worth it. 

  • Dak

    You CAN NOT buy applecare within the first year anymore.  There’s no more standard applecare. It’s Applecare+ or nothing. You have to buy it at time of phone purchase or within 30 days via a genius bar appointment.

  • prof_peabody

    If you bought $640 dollar computers for your kids then you probably want to buy AppleCare+ because this is an outrageously stupid thing to do and you need to cover your ass.  

    If on the other hand you are a normal adult, buying AppleCare+ is a waste of money unless you are a total klutz.  In almost all cases, “extended warranty’s” like this are a scam.  This one isn’t so much because it isn’t *pushed* on the customer and the customer isn’t lied to about needing it by the salesperson (despite what the author says above).  

    In most cases, buying an extended warranty just means you fell for a scam.  

  • crateish

    The power button died on my iPhone 4 out of warranty. I paid Apple $149 for a replacement (iPhone 4s had just come out, but I was not yet eligible for a cheap(er) one). If I would have had AppleCare+, the fix would have cost me $148 and I would have protection for one more.

    When I get my iPhone 5 next year, I will be getting AppleCare+.

  • psychobueller

    They’re “pushing it” (and I thin people might be a little too over sensitive to being sold something) because its a great deal. Drop your iPhone once and it can pay for itself. Remember, a replacement iPhone during the carrier’s 2-year period is a minimum of $649. So the extra $99 up front sound like smart protection so I never have to worry about my phone.

  • ShoyuWeenie

    It’s funny how the author talks about researching the pros and cons of getting an AppleCare, while clearly he hasn’t done his. As mentioned by a few people, there is NO more AppleCare, and only AppleCare+ is available for iPhones.

    Yes, it’s true not everyone needs/wants it. If you’re a person who fixes computers/electronics, there’s a good chance you don’t need it. However, for the layperson, this is a good investment. For instance, if my fridge breaks down, I’m definitely not fixing it since I don’t even know where to start. Yeah, I can research online and figure it out. Of course, I might end up buying all sorts of tools and parts. I might as well use the manufacturer’s warranty and have someone come over and fix it for me.

    A few years ago, I was working at my college’s computer store. Even though it’s not required, I almost always recommend fellow students in getting AppleCare. It’s simply incredible how many students don’t take good care of their computers! I must admit, I was one of them. When your late for class, there’s just not enough time getting your stuff together, so you just start throwing things in your bag, including that expensive notebook! Also, there’s all that bumping and grinding your bag takes while in a hurry in between classes (kids, please pick classes close to each other, not at the opposite end of campus).

    As a general rule, if it’s an expensive Apple portable device, I will get AppleCare within the one year warranty, except for AppleCare+, which needs to be purchased within thirty days.

  • Wsachs

    YOu have to buy it when you buy the phone.  Not available later.

  • Wsachs

    Apple Care + for the phone is ONLY available at the time of purchase, not thru a third party to add on later.

  • ShoyuWeenie

    Please check here:
    http://www.apple.com/support/p

    Scroll down and look under “Important notes”.

  • Wsachs

    So you’re willing to pay full price for you phone $649 if you drop it, get water damage, etc.  Good for you, I’m not!

  • Wsachs

    Not so any more with this program.  Free phones to people who damage them is gone.  Either pay up now or big time later.  Get it!  Let me know how taking your chances works out!

  • Wsachs

    Nobody makes a commission at Apple.  NOBODY!

  • Wsachs

    Read my lips, NO ONE at APPLE makes commission/incentives/bonuses.  They are paid hourly.  Can’t make an intelligent decision unless you have the facts and you don’t!

  • Wsachs

    Yes. you can buy it up till the end of the first year, but you’ve lost 9 months of being able to call AppleCare for FREE to help you with your computer, applications, etc.  Better than dragging the 27″ in to the store to get a simple question answered.

  • Wsachs

    Good for you.  My wife bought an Acer earlier this year with extended warranty.  She had to ship it to Texas ($15 for the computer box from Fed Ex) AND pay for overnight shipping $125 and then wait 7-10 days for return, just to have the hard drive and some other things replaced for free.  More than the cost of Apple Care and could have been done at my Apple store the same day.  Hard to believe not one virus, etc. on your Windows computers in 17 years.  You live a charmed life!  Or your just shitting us.

  • Joe Reece

    It’s only $199 if you have to out of warranty research before you comment

  • Kent_Dorfman

    If you buy any Apple or electronic product in the State of Maine, you automatically get a 4-year warranty by state law.  I always ask if their warranty is better.

  • Dingerz

    Exactly.  I know if something went wrong, it’s *my* fault for not getting the coverage, and I would deal with the consequences.  I too hate it when people get mad in retrospect because they refused insurance and later on they need help.  

  • Dingerz

    I never said I didn’t have trojans.  Oh I had many over the years and it is one of the reasons I switched to a Mac.  (yes, I know that Macs can get trojans, but I’ll take the 5 trojans a year compared to the 34986193461986319864198649 a year on a PC.) The thing is, I fixed each and every trojan I ever got and fixed my computer back to perfection myself.  Oh yes, I remember the many wasted hours of purging each one.  I had that capability.  So yes, thanks to me learning the ins and outs of my computer, I was able to deal with anything that came my way.    

  • tpony

    I’d rather fix the phone myself.

  • zagatosz

    Extended warranties are primarily a profit machine for retailers, that is why the push them so hard. For most people it a waste of money, but I can see that if you had a teenager it might be worthwhile for the replacement aspect.

  • Apple Fan

    I think applecare plus is an amazing deal! if you look at the cost of other accidental damage protection plans for the iPhone you will end up paying $10 a month to your carrier and a $150 deductible if it has to be replaced! and FYI you cant buy stander applecare for the iPhone anymore its applecare plus or nothing

  • CharliK

    but such things don’t cover if you break it. So you have to weigh the issue of whether you  might and can you afford $199 an incident. Because there are no more “one time exceptions”. You break it, you pay. 

  • CharliK

    not true. they started off that way but as of the beginning of this week you now have 30 days to change your mind. 

    BUT you have to make a Genius Bar appointment because they are the only ones that can sell you the service. There’s no retail box to just walk in and get and sign up online

  • CharliK

    too many folks were nagging their way into a 2nd, 3rd, 4th ‘one time exception’ and thus this program was born and that whole allowance is gone. 

    As for the computer, as you said, it was a known issue. Had it not been they wouldn’t have likely been so generous because that is a huge amount of money for that work. 

  • Todd

    What’s the lesson here? Maybe instead of an incoherent hypothetical rant, an actual detailed explaination of the pros and cons of AppleCare+ would have been more helpful.

  • Kent_Dorfman

    Actually, it does.

  • Jeffrey Gee

    Some credit cards (like American Express’s Blue Card) offer you an additional year of warranty when the manufacturer’s warranty expires and in the case of an iPhone with a 2 year contract with the amount of warranty protection you need weighed out, this can work out beautifully.  I buy all my Apple products on AMEX; instead of, my other cards for this reason.

  • joewaylo

    It is a wastes in one context: you don’t ever drop your 4S. Or iPhone 4 for that matter. I’ve used a battery case on my iPhone 4 for 7 months since mophie made their improved battery case. The case has a few dinks sure and a few dinks above the 4′s glass line. And scratches you might see on the display as a result of keys and phone in one pocket. But I have yet to shatter my glass, dunk my phones in water, and aside from a blue indoor camera glow have a tint issue.

    Do I need the $50 a year package? Maybe not since in 12-18 months based on good financial standing and hardly dropping it.

  • Versaceboy54

    Can you please tell me where you bought your apple care for your MacBook pro for that price? I am still covered for the year untill June and qualify for the student discount but am still looking for a cheaper price on it if possible. It’s for the 17 inch. I have looked and haven’t found prices anything close to that just 239 from apple?

  • Darrius_18

    Saying that applecare+ is a waste of money is like saying car insurance is a waste of money. Everyone thinks they don’t need it until something bad happens. So stop being so cheap the iphone cost a lot of money so why not get it covered.

  • Gregintosh

    For $100 I can walk into any Apple store in the country (perhaps world?) and get my iPhone swapped out on the spot for just $49 more if I were to physically destroy it.

    That is much better than locating a repair shop, trying to order parts on eBay and doing it myself (and if it doesn’t work right afterwards, I’m screwed), etc. And the protection lasts 2 years which will be the whole lifespan of the phone for me.

    I think it’s a pretty good deal, considering that the plan + phone already will cost me about $2,500.

  • Gregintosh

    I’m pretty sure the government doesn’t mandate companies to cover accidental damage including physical damage by state law for 4 years. If so, prove it (show us some links/references).

    I’ll save you the hassle: http://www.allamericanpatriots

    “In general, the implied warranty law applies to new or used consumer items that:

    1. Are seriously defective;
    2. Have not been abused; and
    3. Were purchased less than four years ago and still within their normally expected “useful life” (i.e., not simply worn out).”

    The “not been abused” part would instantly disqualify you if you had dropped your phone or had water damage, etc. Sure you may say that it was an accident, but the company could say you did it on purpose to get a new one.

    Unless you can prove it, I’m pretty sure they would not be required to honor it. And getting them to honor it through legal means (i.e. making some calls, filing complaints, following up on your complaints, etc.) would be more hassle than simply paying another $200 for a new one (unless your time has no value that is).

  • odemata

    All consumer electronic products are designed to fail within a certain time and use. Apple products are no different. Just google a search and see how from power cords to batteries have constant issues and requires a replacement. Apple smartly, only supports a device with the warranty up to two years with no extension option…hmmm two years is a magic number there. Buying their warranty you do get good service when eventually the problem comes, but it can also add tremendously to the initial cost so it can be a issue for some. Recommended? Yes and no, that product will fail depending on frequency of use but it may just cost you less to get the next model

  • KoreyAusTex

    Actually, you have no idea what you are talking about. You could not be more wrong. You still can buy regular AppleCare.

  • Manish Bhatia

    AT&T offers mobile insurance for $7/month which actually covers loss and theft. I believe the cost of a replacement is $150 for iPhones for up to two per 12 months. I believe the plan is non contractual and can be cancelled anytime (but not renewable once cancelled). 
    Since in my opinion most issues with a phone is either a loss, stolen or breakage, I would lean towards this type of plan rather than the Apple Care type plan.

  • Vimnvigor

    Thanks for caring enough about your Apple-user colleagues for writing this. Most worthy of you!

  • Robert Mungo

    What I don’t appreciate with the Apple Store is the fact that I was told by not one, but TWO, people who worked there that I had to buy AppleCare+ when I bought my iPhone AND this article AND user comments all say I have to purchase it with my iPhone… but…

    “AppleCare+ must be purchased within 30 days of the date you bought your
    new iPhone. If you did not purchase AppleCare+ with your iPhone, you may
    purchase it at an Apple Retail Store or, for a limited time, by calling
    Apple at 1-800-275-2273. If you’re buying AppleCare+ at an Apple Retail
    Store, a Genius will first need to verify your iPhone purchase date and
    confirm that your iPhone has no pre-existing damage.” – http://www.apple.com/support/p

    I didn’t purchase AppleCare+. I have had a iPhone (A 3G that lasted until the 4S came out, apparently I only buy them when they get snazzy letters.) previously and I had absolutely no problem with it. In the last couple of months, the back of the phone developed a small crack, but that’s because my case broke and it was hard to find a cheap case in stores.

    Also, you’re not covered if you use software that is created by Apple, but considered “Beta” “Prerelease” or “Preview” software. So, using Apple created services that are not an official release yet will void your service contract.

    Siri is still in Beta.

  • CM_Litton

    Jonathan,

    I think you maybe wishing you had put a little more thought into this post. Obviously your friend may have experienced a ‘hard sell’, probably because of ‘metrics’ or the experience of the salesmen with past customers. I realize this is an ‘opinion’ piece, however the factual inaccuracies do not help strengthen your position.

    Applecare+ has replaced Applecare for iPhone. AC+ is now only available at point of purchase OR within 30 days of purchase providing it is inspected at a Genius Bar. One cannot (to my understanding) just get AC within the first year on the iPhone anymore. A fact your very well informed friend should have realized.

    Also you are correct that,

    “Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying AppleCare+ or other service contracts
    are a scam, but these plans are a waste of money if you never need to
    use them.”

    however as an Attorney, I am sure you have used similar services to protect your home,life, and auto. A blanket statement like that is not in your best interest.

    Overall none should be subjected to a ‘hard sell’. It deteriorates the relationship between the customer and the company. A little more research and delving into the subject matter a little more, might have been a bit much to ask on an opinion piece.

  • No

    no you cant. 

  • KoreyAusTex

    Call them, I just bought regular 69.00 AppleCare for my phone 4S, you are FOS.

About the author

Jonathan ZschauJonathan was introduced to Apple at the age of five when his family bought its first computer, an Apple IIGS, in 1986. He has owned and used Macs almost exclusively ever since. He is an attorney from Boston, Massachusetts where he focuses on litigation technology. As a contributor he writes about consumer protection issues related to Apple products. He is also the author of Buying and Owning a Mac: Secrets Apple Doesn't Want You to Know.

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