Angry fan’s Super Bowl ring design needles Patriots over Deflategate

Think the New England Patriots deserve this for a Super Bowl ring? A Kickstarter campaign aims to make this a symbol of Deflategate.
Think the New England Patriots deserve this for a Super Bowl ring? A Kickstarter campaign aims to make this a symbol of Deflategate.
Photo: Jacob Ayers/Kickstarter

A Super Bowl ring is the most coveted of football’s rewards, a talisman with the sparkle to match the magic of a championship season.

An Indianapolis Colts fan wants to give the New England Patriots the ring he thinks they deserve. Sitting on top of his 3-D-printed blue ring is a ball-inflation needle, the kind the NFL now believes was used in the infamous Deflategate game where the Patriots “cheated” their way to the Super Bowl.

Armored whale action figure is no fluke

Mechawhales are the creation of 3D artist Hauke Scheer. Photo: Hauke Scheer
Mechawhales are the creation of 3-D artist Hauke Scheer. Photo: Hauke Scheer

If you want to skip out on posing for photos during the next family vacation, do what Hauke Scheer plans to do — use a 3-D-printed version of yourself as a stand-in.

The Scheer family might let him get away with it, since the fully articulated action figure of himself that he created is a pretty good likeness. The quality of his miniature plastic doppelganger — and the geeky scheme to get out of family portraits — tell you something about Scheer, 39, who earns a living making 3-D-printed figures of mechanized whales and other crazy characters from his home in Frankfurt, Germany.

“I am a total geek with a huge collection of comics, science fiction and fantasy movies and, of course, action figures,” Scheer, who runs Deep Fried Figures, told Cult of Mac. “I started sculpting my own figures during my early teenage years at a time when lots of characters I loved were not available in figure form. After a while, I realized it was even more fun to make characters of my own.”

Enterprise-ing 3D artist honors Leonard Nimoy with Mr. Spock bust

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Phi Vu, a 3D artist in the film, television and video game industry, recently made a 3D-printed bust of Star Trek's Mr. Spock. Photo: Phi Vu
Phi Vu, a 3D artist in the film, television and video game industry, recently made a 3D-printed bust of Star Trek's Mr. Spock. Photo: Phi Vu

To best honor the man beloved for playing Mr. Spock, Phi Vu did what comes most logical to him. He used his talents as a 3D artist to create a bust of the late Leonard Nimoy.

The result is a bronze-colored likeness of the regal Starfleet first officer that rivals anything that could be created on the Enterprise’s holodeck.

The 1/3 scale bust has the high cheekbones, a brow lifted by severely angled eyebrows, and those signature Vulcan ears.

The 3-D printed TV with a tiny 2-inch screen that really works

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This miniature1950s-inspired television was made on a 3D printer and built around electronics that brings it to life. Photo: Formlabs/YouTube
This miniature1950s-inspired television was made on a 3D printer and built around electronics that brings it to life. Photo: Formlabs/YouTube

About the only thing you can’t print on a 3-D printer is a time machine. However, the creators at Formlabs have managed to bring forward a staple from many 1950s living rooms.

OK, so 3-D printing a miniaturized replica of a Philco Predicta television isn’t exactly time travel, but you can ignore that when you realize the TV actually works.