How to understand the amazing new battery info in iOS 12

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Slice and dice the battery info however you like.
Slice and dice the battery info however you like.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

The new iOS 12 Battery information page section is a massive improvement on the previous version. Whereas before you could see which apps had used how much battery, and for how long, now you can see the charts which look like the Tim Cook section of an Apple Keynote. You can see your battery use in incredible detail, broken down by such categories as Screen On Usage, and Screen Off Usage.

But that’s not all. You can see how fast the battery ran down, how the levels where at any time during the last 24 hours, and also a longer-term overview which shows your usage over time.

It’s so detailed that it can be a bit intimidating, so today we’ll take a look to see how to read those charts, and how to get the best out of them.

How to schedule your meetings automatically

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WhenWorks Never negotiate meeting times again.
Never negotiate meeting times again.
Photo: WhenWorks

You know when somebody wants to meet up with you, and you end up spending so much time going back and forth trying to agree a time and date that you end up hating that person, and cancel the meeting? Maybe you just lost a multi-million dollar contract for your company, and it’s all the fault of scheduling annoyances1.

WhenWorks fixes that by letting folks book time with you online, using a form that is connected to the calendar on your iPhone.

How to share passwords with AirDrop in iOS 12

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Is this gentleman about to share a password using AirDrop?
Is this gentleman about to share a password using AirDrop?
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

iOS 12 adds the ability to share passwords via AirDrop, which is super-duper useful. Maybe you want to send your Netflix password to your spouse so you can watch that movie on his iPad, or maybe the password you just created for the local grocery delivery service. In short, any time you have previously used 1Password (or Cult of Mac sponsor Dashlane) to show your password in large type so somebody else could copy it, then you can now use AirDrop. And here’s how:

How to use Pages as an iPad teleprompter

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The Cult of Mac team always seems very happy with my motivational speeches.
The Cult of Mac team always seems very happy with my motivational speeches.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

A recent update to Apple’s Pages word processor added something called Presenter Mode, a neat, simplified full-screen view of your document that sits somewhere between Safari’s Reader View, and a full-on Keynote presentation. The text is enlarged, and can be set to scroll automatically.

In other words, Presenter Mode is a kind of teleprompter. The idea is not that you present the document to other people, like with a Keynote presentation, but that you yourself are the presenter. Let’s see how it works.

How to clean your gross, waxy AirPods

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Cleaning your AirPods is easy, and you probably have the tools to do it already.
Cleaning your AirPods is easy, and you probably have the tools to do it already.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

The other day on the metro, I pulled out my AirPods and dropped one on the floor. It bounced over dried and dirty beer stains, and who knows what other filth and bacteria traipsed in on a million passengers’ shoes (and the odd hippie’s bare feet). I gave up on listening to anything on the trip home, and slipped the rescued AirPod back into its case.

Today we’re going to see how to clean AirPods (or any other earbuds). It’s not only hippie toe jam that we have to worry about, either. Because we’re always pushing these things deep into moist holes in our heads, they crust up with earwax and whatever bacteria we have living in our earholes. Happily, cleaning and disinfecting AirPods is not only easy. It’s just about as satisfying as digging a deep-seated booger out of your nose, or picking an almost-healed scab.

How to add your own Siri Shortcuts right now

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Siri
Siri Shortcuts could become super powerful.
Photo: Apple

Siri Shortcuts are the iOS way to automate actions you do over and over. The WWDC 2018 keynote gave an examples of chaining together a bunch of these actions into one shortcut — order your favorite “coffee,” and give you directions to work, or switch on the lights at home one whole hour before you get there in order to, I don’t know, waste electricity? To trigger these little automations, you just tell Siri, using a pre-chosen keyword/name.

However, you don’t alway want to put together lots of steps. Sometimes you just want Siri to carry out a single action with a Shortcut. For instance, opening up your favorite news site in Safari, or sending a message to your spouse, or viewing your most recent photos. The good news is, you can do all of these today, in the first iOS 12 beta, even without the fancy new Siri Shortcuts app.

OMFG the Mac’s Calculator has always had a paper tape

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You are the operator of a pocket calculator. The Mac calculator paper tape function is a hidden hoot.
You are the operator of a pocket calculator.
Photo: Jim Champion/Flickr CC

If you don’t already know it, then this tip is about to blow your mind. It’s the paper roll for the Mac’s Calculator app, which has been a feature since, like, forever. You may have been using the Calculator since the very beginnings of Mac OS X, and yet you may still have never seen it.

There’s an old proverb: “The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is today.” That totally applies to the Mac Calculator’s paper toll. Let’s check it out.

6 reasons you should switch to Safari in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

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A desert, not unlike the Mojave, where you could go on safari.
A desert, not unlike the Mojave, where you could go on safari.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

In iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, Safari gets solid improvements that will win you back from Chrome — especially if you value your privacy. But while safeguarding your privacy and security on the web fuels many of Safari’s great new features, there’s much more Safari goodness to anticipate.

Let’s take a look at the upcoming Mac and iOS versions of the Apple web browser.

iOS 12 photo imports are way, way better

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Somehow this happened…
Somehow this happened…
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

In iOS 11 and earlier, importing photos from a camera to your iPad photo library has always been a bit clunky. You plug the SD card in using the Lightning SD card reader, or the hook the camera up to the USB adapter, and then the Photos import takes over your entire screen.

Also, all the images that you import got dumped right into the main photo library, leaving you to manually select them later if you want to add them to albums. In iOS 12, though, this has all been improved. Let’s take a look: