AirPod is crucial component of robot umpire

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airpod
Home plate umpire Brian deBrauwere, was the first ump to wear an AirPod during a game.
Photo: AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Robot umpires have finally arrived in baseball’s minor leagues and Apple’s technology is making it all possible.

The Atlantic League, an independent league mostly based on the East Coast, recently became the first professional baseball league to use a computer to call balls and strikes. A human umpire still stands behind home plate, but the gig just got a lot easier thanks to AirPods connected to an iPhone that tells him the right call.

Washington Nationals fans can use Apple Pay to purchase snacks

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MLB
They can also order more substantial food from their seats.
Photo: Andrei Niemimäki/Flickr CC

For whatever reason, the worlds of pro baseball and Apple Pay seem to go hand in hand. First it was just using the iPhone’s NFC scanning tech for ticketing.

Now, fans attending Washington Nationals baseball games in the 2019 season can enjoy another perk. By using Apple Pay contactless payments, they can pay for food using a roving payments terminal operated by concessions hawkers. Along with paying for snacks, they can also use an app to place orders for more substantial hot food from their seats.

How to watch the MLB playoffs on Apple devices

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Get ready to watch some baseball. It's easier than ever to stream MLB playoffs.
Get ready to watch some baseball.
Photo: Paul Lim/Flickr CC

By Chris Brantner

With the Major League Baseball playoffs starting Tuesday, fans will be anxiously watching to see if their team advances and, eventually, who will bring home the World Series title.

Whether you have cable or not, you can still watch the entire MLB playoffs season from the Apple device of your choice. Here’s how to catch all the action on iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Mac, etc.

iPhone lets Phillies fans order a ballpark beer by text

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It's the fullfillment of many a baseball fan's dreams: beer by text.
It's the fullfillment of many a baseball fan's dreams: beer by text.
Photo: Aramark

The Philadelphia Phillies and Aramark started a pilot program that lets fans order beer from their seats using an iPhone.

The service makes use of Apple Business Chat, a service that launched this spring designed to let customers send messages to companies without strings attached.

MLB 9 for iOS gives you your baseball gaming fix on the go

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MLB
The ultimate MLB game experience for iOS.
Photo: Com2us

Baseball season is here, and if you’re a fan, we’ve got the perfect game for you! Developers Com2us has returned with the latest installment in their yearly franchise, MLB 9 Innings Baseball 18.

The officially licensed game boasts 3D graphics, all 30 MLB ballparks, up-to-date teams with all 1,700 players, and a new one-handed Arcade Mode, which should make it easier to get your baseball fix on the go. Check out the game’s two trailers below.

Siri will no longer be stumped by your baseball queries

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MLB
Siri's new upgrade is a home run for MLB fans.
Photo: Andrei Niemimäki/Flickr CC

Just in time for Apple’s new multiyear deal with Major League Baseball, Siri can answer whatever baseball questions you have, thanks to newly implemented knowledge covering 29 baseball leagues. Apple’s AI helper also now boasts a deep understanding of hardball history, based on stats dating back to the start of baseball records.

Ex-baseball player makes pitch to turn iPhone into radar gun

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The Scoutee can attach to an iPhone and record pitch speeds and other data it sends to an app.
The Scoutee can attach to an iPhone and record pitch speeds and other data it sends to an app.
Photo: Scoutee

Miha Uhan’s dream of standing on a big league mound is dead. But he’s still got a big pitch that could impact the game of baseball.

The former Slovenia national team player now leads a team of developers who have created a small device that can turn an iPhone into a radar gun to clock the speed of a thrown baseball.

A baseball coach changed the game with a little police work to solve fastball mystery

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An early radar gun used by a Dodgers scout during the 1970s.
An early radar gun used by a Dodgers scout during the 1970s.
Photo: efastball.com

Michigan State University baseball coach Danny Litwhiler was reading the campus newspaper one day in 1974 when he decided to call the cops on some of his pitchers.

An article and photo of campus police showing off the department’s new radar gun to catch speeders caught Litwhiler’s eye and he wanted police to swing by the ballpark with the new toy to see if it could read the speed of a pitched baseball.

Litwhiler – a flawless defensive player in the bigs who evolved into a beloved college coach – changed the game of baseball that day. No longer would myth and mystery surround the fastball. Pitchers, for better or worse, would be scouted and evaluated based on a new number – miles per hour.

Indians’ bullpen ransoms 100th home run ball for a ton of Apple products

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Give us an Apple Watch, or the baseball get it.
Give us an Apple Watch, or the baseball get it.
Photo: Cleveland Indians/Twitter

Cleveland Indians outfielder Brandon Moss hit his 100th home run in the major leagues yesterday against the Kansas City Royals. The ball representing his career milestone landed in his own team’s bullpen, but unfortunately for Moss, his teammates are holding the it ransom. And all they want is a few grand worth of Apple products.

After catching Moss’ home run, the bullpen’s pitchers scribbled down a ransom note, telling Moss “you get the ball when we get these items.” Take a look at their list of ransom items and try to find something not made by Apple: