Switch Quickly To Big Finder Icons With AppleScript [OS X Tips]


Big icon view

One cool thing you can do in the Finder is set any window to view as large, 512X512 icons. You can do this by clicking on the icon button in the top left of any Finder window, then dragging the resizing slider in the lower right corner.

It’s fairly easy, but not super precise, and if you often use the Finder to quickly scroll through large photo icons to preview images you’ve taken or downloaded, it can be somewhat of a tedious chore.

Creating an AppleScript to do it for you is easy, and it will save you some serious time.

Productivity Boost – Copy Files From One Tab To Another [OS X Tips]


Tabbed Finder

Copy and Paste has been around for a good long while, obviously, and drag and drop even longer. Moving files from one spot to another in the Finder is a fairly easy, well-rehearsed process that one wonders if we really need another way.

OS X Mavericks has introduced, however, yet another way to move files with the new tabbed Finder feature. It seems like a pretty cool way to move stuff from one folder to another without having to clutter up your Mac screen with a bunch of windows.

Double Your Mac Productivity With The OS X Mavericks Productivity Course [Deals]


After the holiday season, there are usually a lot of new Mac owners. Many of those new Mac users aren’t familiar with the platform, having switched from a Windows machine. Instead of relying on more seasoned Mac owners, wouldn’t it be great if there was an easy way to point new users in the right direction? Thanks to Cult of Mac Deals and Mac Dojo, now there is.

The Mac Dojo Productivity Course couldn’t come at a better time in the twilight of the holiday season. There’s a lot of you with new Macs out there, and if you want to get the most out of it – this is the course for you. And you can get it for a limited time for only $25 – a savings of 74%!

Tired Of Clicking? Use The Keyboard To Navigate The Menu Bar [OS X Tips]


Look, ma, no mouse!
Look, ma, no mouse!

Back in the day, Apple popularized the point and click interface so well that Microsoft decided it would use the same system, thereby paving the way for decades of mouse pointers and menu systems.

Still, one of the great things about Mac OS X is the way it caters to the power user with keyboard shortcuts, both built in and customizable. Heck, in Mavericks, you can even sync these custom tricks with iCloud.

It comes as an obvious surprise, then, when you realize that you can even navigate that most mouse-centric of innovations, the menu bar.