Full Monty Finder Windows – Go Big Or Go Home [OS X Tips]

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Finder Full Screen

Sure, we all know that we can embiggen our applications on the Mac, clicking on the little arrows in the upper right corner of any app. That way, we can get fullscreen versions of our apps to utilize all the screen real estate we have.

I like to make my browser and image editing software full screen, placing each one in a separate Desktop Space, switching between them with a keyboard shortcut for easy access.

Did you know, however, that you can do the same with any Finder window? I know I didn’t.

How To Get All Of Your Photos Into Flickr And Forget Everpix Forever [How To]

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Flickr can become the central home for all your photos.
Flickr can become the central home for all your photos.

Intro

After the recent Everpix shutdown, I moved all my photos to Flickr. If you read my roundup of Everpix alternatives, you’ll know that Flickr wasn’t my first choice, but it turns out that neither is it my only choice. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

Everpix was great because it just sucked in all your photos, whether you kept them in iPhoto, on your iPhone, in a weird beardo folder structure on your Mac, or even if you took all of your photos using Instagram. It was far from perfect, but it was the best. And then it went away.

How To Turn App Nap Off For Specific Apps On Your Mac [OS X Tips]

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Turn App Nap Off

OS X Mavericks has been designed to optimize your Mac. Whether it’s an older Mac or a new one, a desktop or a laptop: Mavericks just makes everything work better.

One feature that helps in the effort to keep your battery from running out as fast as it could is App Nap, a way for your Macbook to put the apps that aren’t being actively used on a low-energy mode, which consumes less power, and helps your battery stay fuller, longer.

However, you can also turn this feature off for a specific app that you want to run at full power all the time.

Change The Name, Tags, And Location From Any Document Title Bar In Mavericks [OS X Tips]

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New Titlebar Options

We’ve been able to change the name of our Mac documents from the title bar since OS X Mountain Lion, and it’s made for an interesting new workflow.

In fact, there was a nice little drop down menu that would let you duplicate, move, and rename the document resulting from clicking on the triangle to the right of the document name in the title bar.

Now, though, in Mavericks, that’s changed.

Mavericks Makes It Way Easier To Access Your Library Folder [OS X Tips]

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Access Library Folder in Mavericks

Back in OS X Lion and then again in OS X Mountain Lion, Apple hid access to the user Library folder to prevent neophyte OS X users from messing around in the areas of the file system that could cause some damage to their Macs.

That’s fine, of course, but it took a lot of messing around in the Terminal to get that access back, and who remembers Terminal commands from last year? Not us, that’s for sure.

Luckily, Mavericks has a much easier way to turn Library access on.

Tag Files In Mavericks Finder Using The Keyboard

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Easy tagging right there in the Finder.
Easy tagging right there in the Finder.

Mavericks’ new in-Finder tagging is great, letting you treat your files like you treat your Gmails and effectively keeping the same file in multiple “folders” at once. But actually tagging the files is still kind of a pain. Happily, Brett Terpstra is here to help with a rather simple tip.

Force Quit The Current Active App From The Apple Menu [OS X Tips]

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forcequitmenu

When an app gets stuck on my Mac, I typically force quit it by hitting Command-Option-Escape, and then clicking on the app that’s frozen, then hitting the OK button. Then, I hit the “are you sure” dialog button that invariably pops up. It’s a several step process, but I figured that was the price for having multi-tasking that no longer takes down my whole machine.

Turns out, there’s a quicker way to do that right from the Apple Menu. Here’s how.

Compress A Bunch Of Files Into One Zip Archive For Easier Sharing [OS X Tips]

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Compress in Finder

I remember back in the olden, pre-OS X days, when you’d need to use a utility like Stuffit to compress a bunch of files together into one archive, shedding excess data and making it easier to get those files to your recipient due to much smaller bandwidth back then.

That’s not to say it’s not a valuable strategy, even with today’s cloud infrastructure. Getting a bunch of files into one archive makes the logistics of sending someone a ton of files a lot easier, even if there’s less of a need to compress them for bandwidth reasons.

Here’s how to do just that, using the tools already built into your OS X Mac.

Quit Seeing ‘All My Files’ In The Finder – Change The Default New Window View [OS X Tips]

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Finder All My Files

When you open up a new Finder window, at least in OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, you’ll see a snapshot of all the files on your Mac. Apple calls this view, “All My Files,” and it’s a good way to just see what you have on your Mac.

It’s also an annoying view if you’re looking for stuff on your Desktop or Documents. If you want to change the default view for any new Finder windows, here’s how.

Use These Shell Scripts To Organize Your Photos Right There In The Finder

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Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 11.55.47 AM

There’s a lot to be said for organizing your photos into folders in the Finder. In fact, if you’re using an app like Lightroom to organize your photos, then you’re already doing this, albeit with a super-helpful cataloging and editing application laid on top.

But you need some sort of organization, right? And that’s where the amazing Dr. Drang comes in, with a couple of shell scripts do the work for you.