Three ways to save web pages as read-later PDFs on iOS

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A metaphorical view of my badly-organized PDFs
A metaphorical view of my badly-organized PDFs
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

With the demise of Instapaper — in Europe at least — you may be looking for a good way to save web pages for offline reading. The obvious built-in tool for this is Safari’s Reading list, but it’s very limited. Instead, consider turning the web page into a PDF. This lets you read the page anywhere, as well as mark it up with highlights, and search its entire content using Spotlight.

The thing is, there are three different way to save a webpage as a PDF, all of them built-in to iOS. Let’s take a look at how to use them, what the differences are, and which one is best for you.

How to import passwords into Dashlane

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Dashlane screenshot
Importing your passwords into Dashlane couldn't be easier. Check out our video to see how.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

6 reasons you should switch to Safari in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

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A desert, not unlike the Mojave, where you could go on safari.
A desert, not unlike the Mojave, where you could go on safari.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

In iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, Safari gets solid improvements that will win you back from Chrome — especially if you value your privacy. But while safeguarding your privacy and security on the web fuels many of Safari’s great new features, there’s much more Safari goodness to anticipate.

Let’s take a look at the upcoming Mac and iOS versions of the Apple web browser.

Today in Apple history: Safari lands on Windows with a ‘meh’

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Safari on Windows
Safari on Windows wasn't quite the smash hit Apple hoped for.
Photo: Apple

June 11: Today in Apple history: Safari lands on Windows with a mehJune 11, 2007: At WWDC, Steve Jobs unveils Safari 3 for Windows, bringing its web browser to non-Apple computers for the first time.

Apple advertises Safari as the world’s fastest and easiest-to-use web browser, capable of rendering web pages up to twice as far as Internet Explorer and 1.6 times faster than Firefox. It lasts until 2012, but never becomes a major player on Windows.

How to switch on Safari favicons in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

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google chrome favicons
Chrome has managed to display favicons since, like, forever.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

It’s 2018, and yet Safari still won’t show you website icons aka. favicons in its tabs. But that is — finally — about to change. In both iOS 12, and in macOS Mojave, Safari will finally display these favicons, and all you have to do is toggle one setting. Who cares? Well, being able to identify the site you want from a whole mess of tabs is a lot easier if you can spot that site’s colorful logo as an icon, instead of having to read few letters of truncated text when trying to identify it.

Why a dedicated password manager beats your browser every time

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Dashlane password manager vs web browser: Don't rely on your web browser to keep track of your passwords.
Pro tip: Don't rely on your web browser to keep track of your passwords.
Photo: FirmBee/Pixabay CC

iPhone dependence is killing Apple Watch. Here’s how Cupertino could fix it.

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It’s time to cut the cable and set Apple Watch free
It’s time to cut the cable and set Apple Watch free
Photo: Graham Bower/Cult of Mac

For activity tracking, fitness and notifications, Apple Watch is pretty awesome, and these days, that’s all most people use it for. Which is a shame.

When it launched back in 2015, Apple had a much bigger vision: a wearable computing platform supporting a rich and varied ecosystem of apps. Like an iPhone strapped to your wrist. But the reality has turned out to be rather different. Instagram is just the latest of a series of high profile apps to desert the platform. So what’s up?

I believe Apple Watch’s dependence on iPhone is holding it back, and the time has come for Cupertino to set its smartwatch free. In this, the third and final part of my wish list of watchOS 5 features, I’ll focus on how I hope Apple will improve setup, apps and iCloud to create a badass stand-alone device.