Safari dumps failed ‘Do Not Track’ privacy setting

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Do Not Track is gone, replaced with Prevent Cross-Site Tracking.
Do Not Track is gone, replaced with Prevent Cross-Site Tracking.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Safari’s “Do Not Track” setting was supposed to protect us from advertisers following us from website to website but it never worked like it was supposed to and Apple has given up on it.

Instead, the web browser has what Apple calls Intelligent Tracking Prevention.

Apple plans to limit accelerometer and gyroscope access in Safari for iOS

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close all tabs
iOS 12.2 might make Safari more complicated.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple plans to limit Safari’s access to the accelerometer and gyroscope inside your iOS device in an upcoming software update.

iOS 12.2 will prevent websites from having access to motion data by default, rendering certain content unusable — even on Apple’s own website. Users will be able to change this inside Safari’s settings, however.

Latest Mojave beta brings Touch ID support to Safari AutoFill

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2018 MacBook Air Touch ID
Touch ID will get even more useful on macOS.
Photo: Apple

Safari AutoFill in macOS Mojave is about to get even more convenient, thanks to Touch ID support.

The first macOS 10.14.4 beta reveals you’ll be able to log into websites simply by scanning your fingerprint. This feature has long been available on iOS, but it will be a first for Mac.

How to stop Google from tracking your clicks

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Stop the madness
Stop! The! Madness!
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Whenever you click a link in a Google search, it replaces the URL of the site with a tracking URL. If you hover over a link with your mouse before you click it, Safari will show you the full URL of that link. It’s a great way to check where you’re about to get sent. Google plays along with this, showing you the proper URL for the link in question.

Only when you actually click on it, it swaps out that link, replacing it with its own tracking link.

Fortunately, there’s a way to block this sneaky, underhanded and totally unsurprising behavior.

How to increase the font size in Mobile Safari

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Do you see what we did here?
Do you see what we did here?
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

The iPhone and iPad are usually great at making web pages easy to read, even when they have lots of small text. Double-tap on a column of text, and it automatically zooms to fill the screen. Double-tap it again and you’re back where you began.

But sometimes a page behaves badly. You see it often on Internet forums, or the mobile-friendly (!) version of Reddit, for example. The text is tiny, and runs from edge to edge. There’s no way to zoom in. Even if you turn your device on its side to make the screen wider, the text just reflows — the same tiny letters, but in even longer lines.

This weekend I got sick of this, and set out to find a way to increase the font size in Mobile Safari with a bookmarklet. It didn’t take long.

How to use Quick Website Search in Safari for iOS

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This gentleman staring into a light represents the illumination of search.
This gentleman staring into a light represents the illumination of search.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Safari for iOS has a great feature: Quick Website Search. This lets you search the contents of a single website, using that site’s own built-in search. The clever part is that you don’t have to visit the site and tap into its search bar. Once Safari learns how to search that site, you can search it right from Safari’s own search bar.

Screen Time flaw lets kids use Safari without limitations

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iOS 12's new Screen Time feature isn't a panacea for good parenting. Even small children can find workarounds.
Screen Time is a great concept. But it's got its weaknesses.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

iOS 12’s Screen Time feature is a great way of making sure that people, particularly children, don’t spend too long using their iOS devices. That’s an important goal, whether you’re worried about the potential mental health impact of overusing technology or just want to stop your kids wasting their time on social media.

It turns out that there’s a workaround on Safari, however — as discovered by the eldest son of computer security expert and iOS hacker David Schuetz.

How to watch Apple’s ‘More in the Making’ keynote

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Tim Cook and Ivanka Trump
Are you ready for Apple's big event?
Photo: Apple

Apple’s ‘More in the Making’ keynote is less than 24 hours away where the company is expected to unveil a slew of new iPads and Macs.

Unlike last month’s iPhone keynote at Apple Park, this week’s event will be hosted at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and it’s starting early at 10 a.m. ET. If you didn’t get an invite to the event, don’t worry, the entire thing will be live-streamed.

Here’s how to tune in on whatever device you’re using.

Today in Apple history: OS X Panther claws its way onto Macs

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Mac OS X Panther brings Exposé and other new features.
OS X Panther brought cool new features to Macs.
Screenshot: Gudebookgallery/Apple

October 25 Today in Apple history: OS X Panther arrives on Macs October 25, 2003: Mac OS X Panther arrives on Macs, bringing a number of useful new features.

Exposé lets users instantly view all open windows at once. The new iChat AV allows users to talk with audio and video as well as text. Plus, the Mac OS upgrade makes Safari Apple’s default web browser for the first time.

How to use Mojave’s fancy new screenshots tool

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No, not this kind of screenshot.
No, not this kind of screenshot.
Photo: Pete/Public Domain

You almost certainly know the shortcuts for snapping quick screenshots on your Mac. It’s ⇧⌘3 to capture the entire screen, and ⇧⌘4 to get a crosshairs cursor to select a section of the screen.

Now, there’s a new screenshot shortcut in town: ⇧⌘5. And boy is this fella fancy. If this were a western movie, ⇧⌘5 would be the young upstart blowing into town with a couple of Uzis and a pair of Kevlar chaps1. Let’s check out Mojave screenshots.