Pro Tip: One-tap scroll back to the bottom of the camera roll


scroll photos
Ever scroll to the top of your photos by mistake? Don't worry.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Pro Tip Cult of Mac bug Ever tap the top of the screen in your Photos library and find yourself looking at pictures from way back in 2005? Did you swipe something the wrong way and end up stranded, viewing photos from years ago?

You probably sighed to yourself, then set to scrolling back to the bottom of the list to get to your latest photos. Big, angry swipes, just to show your iPhone how mad you were.

Well, after today, you’ll never need to to that again, because there’s a shortcut to scroll back to the very bottom of your Photos camera roll.

How to use Portrait Mode on iPhone X and 8


iPhone 8 Plus portrait lighting camera
Portrait Lighting can make a movie star out of almost anyone. Almost.
Photo: Ste Smith/ Cult of Mac

Portrait mode is an iPhone 7 feature that has been supercharged in the iPhones X and 8, with the addition of Portrait Lighting. Both features use depth data from these iPhones’ dual cameras, either to separate the subject of the photo from its background, or to completely re-light the photo to add drama. Here’s how to make the most of them.

How to create long-exposure effects with iPhone


long exposure sea
Long exposures turn moving water into creepy mist.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

One of the neatest tricks you can do with a standalone camera is the long exposure trick. You may have seen it used to turn the tail-lights of a car into long streaks of red curving through the dark behind a ghostly car, or to blur turbulent waters into a peaceful, misty-looking lake. In a regular camera, you have to finagle the shutter speed to get the level of blur just right, and there’s no second chance. On the iPhone, it’s way easier.

Best iPhone X and iPhone 8 camera accessories


The new iPhone 8 and X cameras are incredible. These accessories make them even better.
Photo: Moment

The iPhone’s camera is good enough that it can be most people’s only camera — including professional photographers. The iPhone is a multi-purpose computer, though, not just a camera, so it can sometimes do with a little help when it comes to ergonomics, or to adding a little extra reach with a telephoto lens. These are the iPhone 8 camera gizmos you should buy:

The iPhone X camera is like a photo studio in your pocket


iPhone x camera
iPhone still dominates Flickr uploads.
Photo: Apple

Just calling the cameras in the iPhone X and the iPhone 8 plus “cameras” is like mistaking the iPhone itself for a phone. The combination of hardware and software in these new machines could better be likened to a movie FX or photography studio in the extent of their capabilities. The standout feature on these new iPhone X camera is Portrait Lighting, and today I want to take a look at why it’s so amazing.

Roland’s pocket-sized GO MIXER adds great audio to iPhone movies


go mixer hero
The GO MIXER adds good-quality sound to your iPhone videos.
Photo: Roland

The Roland GO MIXER is a little box that improves the audio on your movies. Aimed mostly at musicians, but usable by anyone with a microphone and the need to shoot a video, the little Lightning-powered box hooks together all your musical instruments and mixes them, live, before sending the audio to your iPhone (or Android device).

How to view the solar eclipse on your iPhone


solar eclipse on your iPhone
With a little preparation, there's no reason you can't take a an eclipse photo like this on your iPhone.
Photo: Takeshi Kuboki/Flickr CC

In photography terms, snapping a photo of the moment the moon drifts in front of the sun is as easy as snapping any other fleeting event. In future-blindness terms, though, it is quite different.

Staring into the nuclear furnace that is our nearest star won’t only fry your own eyes, it could also finish off your camera’s sensor. With a few simple precautions, though, you can not only view the eclipse safely through your iPhone’s lens, but take some great photos.

How to use iOS 11’s new camera-leveling feature


Level up
Level up: I used the iPad’s camera level to shoot this picture of the iPhone compass level, and it’s still not level.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Did you ever try to take a photo of something flat on the ground, and spend ages trying to line it up right so that it is square in the frame? No, well, humor me here, because Apple just granted everyone’s biggest iOS camera wish: The camera app now has a level that kicks in when you hold the iPhone horizontally, and which will tell you when you’re holding the iPhone, uh, level.

How to shoot amazing black-and-white photos on your iPhone


IPhone tiger black and white

Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Often, our eye is drawn to something because of its color. But sometimes we’re attracted by a pattern, or perhaps color even detracts from an image (like a row of cars in front of a beatific white building). At those times, we should shoot black-and-white images, which emphasize pattern, texture and shape.

The iPhone — with its giant screen, its great camera and its huge library of photo apps — is fantastic for shooting B&W pictures. Let’s take a look at how to shoot amazing black-and-white photos with your iPhone.