Tim Cook says diversity is key to Apple’s ‘magical’ products

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Cook received a warm welcome from students at Auburn University.
Cook received a warm welcome from students at Auburn University.
Photo: Tim Cook/Twitter

Apple CEO Tim Cook made a visit to his old stomping grounds at Auburn University today to talk to students about life after after graduation.

During his morning speech at the Telfair Peet Theatre, the Auburn alum told students of all backgrounds to get ready to embrace diversity once they enter the workforce.

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What Tim Cook really said about Apple’s commitment to people with disabilities

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Tim Cook onstage at the 2014 WWDC. Photo: Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web
Tim Cook onstage at the 2014 WWDC. Photo: Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web

The devil is in the details: Tim Cook said that Apple’s commitment to accessibility is so complete that the Cupertino company never looks at the return on investment but considers it “just and right.”

That’s a pretty different picture than the one venerable news org Reuters painted by giving a quick chop to his comments in a piece about blind app users seeking more accessibility from Apple.

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Tim Cook: How The Klan, MLK and Bobby Kennedy Shaped Me

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Tim_Cook_Auburn_speech

While accepting a lifetime achievement award from Auburn University, his alma mater, Apple CEO Tim Cook told of how The Ku Klux Klan, Martin Luther King and Senator Robert Kennedy shaped his passion for human rights and equality. “Growing up in Alabama in the 1960s, I saw the devastating impacts of discrimination,” Cook said in New York on December 10th. “Remarkable people were denied opportunities and treated without basic human dignity solely because of the color of their skin.”

He recalled childhood memories of watching crosses burn on neighbors’ lawns in Alabama. “This image was permanently imprinted in my brain and it would change my life forever,” Cook said. “For me the cross burning was a symbol of ignorance, of hatred, and a fear of anyone different than the majority. I could never understand it, and I knew then that America’s and Alabama’s history would always be scarred by the hatred that it represented.”

You can watch the full speech below the fold:

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