macOS Mail bug exposes portions of encrypted emails

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MacMail
Your encrypted emails on Mac might not be as private as you think.
Photo: Apple

Apple failed to kill a bug in the Mail app for macOS for months despite its potential to expose private details in emails that the user thought was encrypted.

Security researcher Bob Gendler first discovered the flaw in July and notified Apple of it. Despite releasing four updates for macOS since that time, the privacy flaw still hasn’t been fixed. Apple says it’s working to resolve the issue soon though.

Beautiful drone shots in Apple’s new privacy ad will creep you out

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privacy
Apple's camera man killed it on this ad.
Photo: Apple

Apple just posted a new video advertisement on Youtube, as the company does from time to time.

The ad is about privacy on iPhone which has been one of the company’s biggest talking points over the last few years. Honestly, I don’t think a single word from the ad actually entered my ears. I was too blown away with the creepy beautiful FPV drone shots that transport you from being a distant observer to an intimate guest in someone’s life.

Check it out:

Firefox 70 draws less power, shows who’s tracking you

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Firefox 70 Enhanced Tracking Protection report
Firefox 70 offers a list of tracking cookies blocked by its Enhanced Tracking Protection.
Photo: Firefox/Cult of Mac

Firefox fans can expect this web browser to be less of a drain on their MacBook’s battery. Plus, the latest version gives users a report showing the dozens of cookies attempting to track them across the Web.

Apple denies it sends everyone’s browser data to Chinese company

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China’s population of 1.4 billion makes it a huge potential market for Apple.
Apple isn’t using the Fraudulent Website Warning to help a Chinese company spy on your web browser.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Apple refutes accusations that it sends information from every iPhone’s and Mac’s Safari browser to China’s Tencent. These are apparently based on a vaguely-worded explanation in Settings which Apple just clarified.

Safari does use a list of fraudulent websites compiled by this Chinese company to protect users, but only if these users are themselves located in China.

How to stop Siri from snooping on you

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Stop siri snooping: LOL look how small Apple made the
LOL look how small Apple made the "Not Now" button.
Photo: Cult of Mac

iOS 13.2 adds controls for Apple’s unpopular Siri data collection program. Now, users can opt in to “Siri and Dictation Analytics,” which translates to letting your iPhone or iPad upload all your Siri interactions so Cupertino can improve the virtual assistant’s accuracy.

Previously, Apple disabled this program because of its unpopularity. Now, it’s back — but under your control.

How to check (and block) apps that track you on iPhone and iPad

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Protect iOS your privacy and data with a firewall app.
Protect iOS your privacy and data with a firewall app.
Photo: Capturing the Human Heart/Unsplash

Safari’s content blockers effectively block trackers and other Bad Stuff on the web, but that only works in Apple’s browser. Any other app you install on your iPhone or iPad can send all kinds of personal information to anyone, without you ever knowing. Your location, the details of your menstrual cycle, how long you spend asleep — pretty much anything.

So how do you stop this? Well, iOS 13 itself can help limit some abuses. But what you really need is an iOS firewall app that can detect and shut down any unauthorized connections.

Google adds enhanced privacy tools to Maps and YouTube

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Google Maps and YouTube privacy tools
It's getting easier to not be tracked in Maps. And YouTube is getting a timed history auto-delete.
Photo: Google

Google just promised that Incognito mode will soon be added to Maps. And YouTube is getting timed auto-delete for the user’s video history. In addition, a new Password Checkup tool helps users avoid common passcodes.

This advertising company has been making similar changes to its other services in hopes of shaking a reputation for privacy invasion.

Boost privacy of Apple Watch Series 5’s always-on face

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apple watch series 5 sleep
When dimmed, the Series 5 can be set to hide sensitive information.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

The one huge new feature in the Apple Watch Series 5 is the always-on display. Day or night, the screen never shuts off. It dims as soon as you stop using it, and all animations stop, but the face stands ready for your curious glance at any time.

However, if you wear your Apple Watch in bed, or you don’t like the idea of the watch showing your info to anybody who cares to look at the device, then there are a few settings that can help. Let’s take a look.