NASA launches its sense of humor in parody music video

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A dance line of NASA interns from a scene in their parody music video called
A dance line of NASA interns from a scene in their parody music video called "All About That Space." From NASA video

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to make a music video, and maybe you shouldn’t be. Turns out, rocket scientists can’t dance.
NASA released a parody video on YouTube Thursday called “All About That Space,” designed to raise excitement about Orion’s recent first test flight.

The lyrics of Meghan Trainor’s monster hit “All About That Bass” were re-engineered by the Pathways Interns of NASA’s Johnson Space Center to lead the viewer on a behind-the-scenes look at the men and woman hard at work on space travel.

Orion’s computer is basically a radiation-proof G3 iBook

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Screen shot of Orion user interface controls: NASA
Screen shot of Orion user interface controls: NASA

NASA’s Orion spacecraft is the most futuristic spacecraft to ever be built, but the tech inside it is shockingly old school, like the onboard computer powering the entire mission, that’s basically only powerful as an 11 year old G3 iBook.

On Earth scientists are all about pursuing the bleeding edge of tech, but in space the number one concern is reliability. Thanks to the higher amounts of radiation astronauts will travel through on the way to Mars, NASA’s engineers have to use a system that’s been tried and test. So to power their computer they’re are using an IBM PowerPC 750FX, that debuted in 2002 and isn’t even as powerful as an iPhone 6.

Orion test flight launches humans one step closer to Mars

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Orion on the launch pad set for an unmanned test flight.  Photo by Kim Shiflett/NASA
Orion on the launch pad set for an unmanned test flight. Photo by Kim Shiflett/NASA

When the final Space Shuttle flight landed in July 2011, there was a sadness that America’s future involvement in space exploration would be nothing more than one of our astronauts occasionally hitching a lift on a rickety Russian rocket.

But NASA, partnered with various aerospace companies, has been quietly designing and building a new program that could eventually take humans into deep space.