Mac Evo concept imagines small, liquid-cooled Apple desktop

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The Mac Evo would fit between the Mac mini and Mac Pro in Apple’s lineup.
The Mac Evo would fit between the Mac mini and Mac Pro in size, capabilities, and assumably price.
Photo: Pierre Cerveau

A new concept called the Mac Evo seeks to bring faster performance through liquid cooling. The computer would be just three times the size of Mac mini but offer greater speed by lowering the temperature of the processor.

The Intel chips Apple uses in its OS X computers often have to be throttled down to keep them from overheating. Liquid cooling is one solution.

Liquid For Mac Wrangles Text Selections From The Keyboard

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Liquid looks set to be a fixture on my Mac. It’s an app which lets you carry out transformations and operations on any selected text, which doesn’t sound like much unless you write for a living, or just have to wrangle lots of letters. It’s actually been around for quite a while (the current version is 4.3), but I figured that if I hadn’t heard of it yet, then maybe you hadn’t either.

Liquid Helps Information Flow Smoothly [Review]

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Copy text and act on it
Copy text and act on it

Liquid is a productivity helper for OS X. It comes in two flavors – free and paid. The idea is to speed up your information seeking workflow. You find something you need to research, and a few key presses later you’ve got some data. Or a unit conversion. Or, in the paid version, a language translation. It’s got a lot of features.

It Takes A Lot Of Water To Kill An iPhone 5 [Video]

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What a waste of good coffee.
What a waste of good coffee.

If you’ve ever managed to spill liquid on an electronic device, then you’ll know that it doesn’t take too much to kill them completely; liquid and electronics simply do not mix. But you might be surprised by how well your iPhone 5 fares when it comes into contact with its biggest enemy.

Apple Abandons Liquid Contact Indicators in iPad 2

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LiquidContacts

Apple has been using Liquid Contact Indicators(LCI) in practically all of their devices for as long as I can remember, but it looks like with the iPad 2 they’ve stopped using them.

This makes sense because these sensors have not been all that reliable and subject to a lot of false positives from something as mundane as sweat. In 2009 this was a big news topic that I covered for CNET and I spoke to local Channel 2 news in Houston, Texas about complaints they had received from iPhone users. Even CNN had something to say about it.

It was so easy to trip these sensors that there was even a lawsuit over it.